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160,468 articles from EurekAlert

Measuring tape is a critical tool for following Zika virus-exposed children

A simple measuring tape could be the key to identifying which children could developneurological and developmental abnormalities from Zika virus exposure during gestation.This is according to an invited commentary published July 7 in JAMA Network Open andwritten by Sarah Mulkey, M.D., Ph.D., prenatal-neonatal neurologist in the Division ofPrenatal Pediatrics at Children's National Hospital.

Microplastic pollution harms lobster larvae, study finds

Microplastic fiber pollution in the ocean impacts larval lobsters at each stage of their development, according to new research. A study published in the Marine Pollution Bulletin reports that the fibers affect the animals' feeding and respiration, and they could even prevent some larvae from reaching adulthood.

New study sparks fresh call for seagrass preservation

An increase in carbon dioxide emissions equivalent to 5 million cars a year has been caused by the loss of seagrass meadows around the Australian coastline since the 1950s.PhD student Cristian Salinas from Edith Cowan University (ECU) in Western Australia calculated that around 161,150 hectares of seagrass have been lost from Australian coasts since the 1950s. This has resulte in a 2 per cent...

Nutrients in microalgae: An environmentally friendly alternative to fish

Microalgae could provide an alternative source of healthy omega-3 fatty acids for humans while also being more environmentally friendly to produce than popular fish species. This is the result of a new study by scientists from Martin Luther University Halle-Wittenberg (MLU). The study was recently published in the Journal of Applied Phycology and offers an initial indication of the environmental...

Repurposing public health systems to decode COVID-19

Research published in the journal Microbial Genomics describes how national surveillance systems can be linked with the UK Biobank. This pooled data could then be used to understand how genetics and other epidemiological factors impact risk of developing severe infection.


MONDAY 6. JULY 2020


2D semiconductors found to be close-to-ideal fractional quantum hall platform

Columbia University researchers report that they have observed a quantum fluid known as the fractional quantum Hall states (FQHS), one of the most delicate phases of matter, for the first time in a monolayer 2D semiconductor. Their findings demonstrate the excellent intrinsic quality of 2D semiconductors and establish them as a unique test platform for future applications in quantum computing.

A 'breath of nothing' provides a new perspective on superconductivity

Zero electrical resistance at room temperature? A material with this property, i.e. a room temperature superconductor, could revolutionize power distribution. But so far, the origin of superconductivity at high temperature is only incompletely understood. Scientists from Universität Hamburg and the Cluster of Excellence 'CUI: Advanced Imaging of Matter' have succeeded in observing strong...

A different Chia-PET provides insight into prostate cancer

UT Southwestern researchers have identified vast webs of small snippets of the genome that interact with each other and with genes to promote prostate cancer. Their findings, published June 22 in the Journal of Clinical Investigation, could lead to new ways to treat the most common type of malignancy in American men other than skin cancer.

A new biotinylation enzyme for analyzing protein-protein interactions

Proteins play roles by interacting with various other proteins. Therefore, interaction analysis is an indispensable technique for studying the function of proteins. In this research, we have developed a biotinylation enzyme, AirID, using an ancestral enzyme reconstruction algorithm. AirID is a highly active biotinylation enzyme with low toxicity. By using AirID, comprehensive biotinylation of...

A tiny ancient relative of dinosaurs and pterosaurs discovered

Dinosaurs and pterosaurs may be known for their remarkable size, but a newly described species that lived around 237 million years ago suggests that they originated from extremely small ancestors. The fossil reptile, named Kongonaphon kely, or "tiny bug slayer," would have stood just 10 centimeters tall. The study may help explain the origins of flight in pterosaurs, the presence of "fuzz" on both...

Age-related impairments reversed in animal model

Frailty and immune decline are two main features of old age. Researchers from the University of Bern and the University Hospital Bern now demonstrate in an animal model that these two age-related impairments can be halted and even partially reversed using a novel cell-based therapeutic approach.

Asthma and allergies more common in 'night owl' teens: study

Teenagers who prefer to stay up late at night and sleep in late the next day are more likely to develop asthma and allergies than their 'early bird' counterparts, according to new research published today.'Compared to the morning type, those who go to bed late have approximately three times higher risk of developing asthma,' said principal investigator Subhabrata Moitra, a post-doctoral fellow in...

Behind the dead-water phenomenon

What makes ships mysteriously slow down or even stop as they travel, even though their engines are working properly? This was first observed in 1893 and was described experimentally in 1904 without all the secrets of this "dead water" being understood. A French team has explained this phenomenon for the first time.

Black patients have higher rates of death after PCI

Black patients who undergo percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) are at an increased risk for major adverse outcomes, including death, compared to white patients, according to a study published today in JACC: Cardiovascular Interventions. The study underscores the high rates of cardiovascular disease and risk factors in minorities and continued need for further research on race-based outcomes...

Cancer treatment in young women need not mean the end of their fertility

The first long-term record of how cancer patients made use of their stored eggs and embryos after cancer treatment is presented today at the 36th Annual Meeting of ESHRE. The results demonstrate from the 20-year data how successful fertility preservation can be in these patients, especially those with breast cancer. Details of the analysis, covering the longest reported period of use, are...

Colony-level genetics predict gentle behavior in Puerto Rican honey bees

Puerto Rico's population of African-European hybrid honey bees (AHB) are famously known for being much gentler than their continental counterparts. Now Agricultural Research Service (ARS) scientists and their colleagues have found that this reduced defending of the nest is determined by colony-level genetics as opposed to individual bee's DNA, according to a study just published in the Proceedings...

Common hypertension medications may reduce colorectal cancer risk

People who take angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors (ACE-i) or angiotensin II receptor blockers (ARBs) for conditions such as high blood pressure were less likely to be diagnosed with colorectal cancer after having a normal colonoscopy.This is the first study to show potential benefits on colorectal cancer development from these commonly prescribed hypertension medications, based on a study...

Compounds halt SARS-CoV-2 replication by targeting key viral enzyme

University of South Florida Health (USF Health) Morsani College of Medicine scientists recently worked with colleagues at the University of Arizona College of Pharmacy to identify several existing compounds that block replication of the COVID-19 virus (SARS-CoV-2) within human cells grown in the laboratory. The inhibitors all demonstrated potent chemical and structural interactions with a viral...

Consumers prefer round numbers even when the specific number is better news

Consider this scenario: A vaccine for the novel coronavirus has been developed that is 91.27% effective. If public health officials present this information using the specific number, people are likely to think the vaccine is actually less effective than if it is presented as being 90% effective. This concept is a real-life application of recent findings from Gaurav Jain, an assistant professor of...

Coronary calcium scoring: Personalized preventive care for those most at risk

An imaging test called coronary calcium scoring can help doctors to make the right recommendation about the use of statin therapy. The test is a 10-minute CT (computed tomography) scan looking for calcium deposits in the arteries supplying blood to the heart. Calcium deposits indicate the presence of coronary plaque, also known as atherosclerosis.