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160,712 articles from EurekAlert

Alzheimer-linked protein complex at super resolution

With the advent of super-resolution microscopy, scientists can study close protein associations better than ever before. In the latest edition of eLife, the team of Wim Annaert (VIB-KU Leuven) combines state-of-the-art imaging techniques to investigate the distribution of γ-secretase, a protein complex associated with both Alzheimer's disease and cancer.

Breakthrough with cancer vaccine

Scientists have developed a new cancer vaccine with the potential to activate the body's immune system to fight a range of cancers, including leukaemia, breast cancer, lung cancer and pancreatic cancers.

Care for cats? So did people along the Silk Road more than 1,000 years ago

Common domestic cats, as we know them today, might have accompanied Kazakh pastoralists as pets more than 1,000 years ago. This is indicated by new analyses done on an almost complete cat skeleton found during an excavation along the former Silk Road in southern Kazakhstan. An international research team has reconstructed the cat's life, revealing astonishing insights into the relationship between...

Chatbots can ease medical providers' burden, offer guidance to those with COVID-19 symptoms

COVID-19 has placed tremendous pressure on health care systems, not only for critical care but also from an anxious public looking for answers. Research from the Indiana University Kelley School of Business found that chatbots -- software applications that conduct online chats via text or text-to-speech -- working for reputable organizations can ease the burden on medical providers and offer...

Extreme rainfall events cause top-heavy aquatic food webs

In research recently outlined in Nature, scientists across seven different sites throughout Central and South America replicated the extreme rainfall events predicted by climate change science. Using the insect larvae that live in the water trapped by bromeliad plants as a model ecosystem, they found that food webs became top-heavy with predators when there were large day-to-day variations in...

Gall fly outmaneuvers host plant in game of "Spy vs. Spy"

Over time goldenrod plants and the gall flies that feed on them have been one-upping each other in an ongoing competition for survival. Now, a team of researchers has discovered that by detecting the plants' chemical defenses, the insects may have taken the lead.

Research shows child abuse and neglect results in increased hospitalizations over time

In a new study published in the leading international journal, Child Abuse and Neglect, University of South Australia researchers have found that by their mid-teens, children who were the subject of child protective services contact, are up to 52 per cent more likely to be hospitalised, for a range of problems, the most frequent being mental illness, toxic effects of drugs and physical injuries.

Temple scientists identify key factor regulating abnormal heart growth

In new work, researchers at the Lewis Katz School of Medicine at Temple University cast fresh light on a key molecular regulator in the heart known as FoxO1. In a paper published online July 9 in the journal Circulation, the Temple scientists are the first to show that FoxO1 attaches to and activates a wide array of genes in heart cells, leading to widespread increases in growth signaling,...

The spin state story: Observation of the quantum spin liquid state in novel material

The quantum spin liquid (QSL) state is an exotic state of matter where the spin of electrons, which generally exhibits order at low temperatures, remains disordered. Now, scientists from Tokyo University of Science, Japan, have developed a new material where a two-dimensional QSL state can be experimentally observed, advancing our knowledge of spin behavior, and getting us closer to...

Using electricity to break down pollutants left over after wastewater treatment

Pesticides, pharmaceutical products, and endocrine disruptors are some of the emerging contaminants often found in treated domestic wastewater, even after secondary treatment. Professor Patrick Drogui of the Institut national de la recherche scientifique (INRS) and his team have tested the effectiveness of a tertiary treatment process using electricity in partnership with the European Membrane...


WEDNESDAY 8. JULY 2020


A helping hand for cancer immunotherapy

Scientists at Sanford Burnham Prebys Medical Discovery Institute have demonstrated the therapeutic potential of PRMT5 inhibitors to sensitize unresponsive melanoma to immune checkpoint therapy. PRMT5 inhibitors are currently in clinical trials in oncology, and this research provides a strong rationale for evaluating the drugs in tumors that are not responsive to immune checkpoint therapy. The...

Animals who try to sound 'bigger' are good at learning sounds

Some animals fake their body size by sounding 'bigger' than they actually are. Maxime Garcia from the University of Zurich and Andrea Ravignani from the Max Planck Institute for Psycholinguistics studied 164 different mammals and found that animals who lower their voice to sound bigger are often skilled vocalists. Both strategies--sounding bigger and learning sounds--are likely driven by sexual...

Bespoke catalysts for power-to-X

Suitable catalysts are of great importance for efficient power-to-X applications -- but the molecular processes occurring during their use have not yet been fully understood. Using X-rays from a synchrotron particle accelerator, scientists of the Karlsruhe Institute of Technology have now been able to observe for the first time a catalyst during the Fischer-Tropsch reaction that facilitates the...

Certain factors during infancy may affect bone health in adulthood

In a recent study, breast feeding during infancy was associated with a lower risk of lower limb fractures when children reached young adulthood, while maternal smoking was associated with a higher risk of upper limb fractures. The findings are published in the Journal of Bone and Mineral Research.

COVID-19 brain complications found across the globe

Cases of brain complications linked to COVID-19 are occurring across the globe, a new review by University of Liverpool researchers has shown.Published in The Lancet Neurology, the study found that strokes, delirium and other neurological complications are reported from most countries where there have been large outbreaks of the disease.

Enhancing chemotherapy by RNA interference - BIO Integration

Enhancing Chemotherapy by RNA Interference - BIO Integrationhttps://doi.org/10.15212/bioi-2020-0003Announcing a new article publication for BIO Integration journal. In this review article the authors Shuwen Cao, Chunhao Lin, Shunung Liang, Chee Hwee Tan, Xiaoding Xu and Phei Er Saw from Sun Yatsen University, Guangzhou, China and Guangzhou University of Chinese Medicine, Guangzhou, China consider...