750,272 articles

Review: Calling All Spies, Geeks and Gadget Freaks

You know all those movie scenes where the hero must infiltrate a highly secure enemy facility? A normal person thinks something like this: "Oh, my goodness -- I sure hope he manages to get through all those lasers and motion detectors! He's the hero, and therefore I fear for his well-being!" Geeks and gadget freaks, however, are more intrigued by the hero's high-tech spy gear. "Cool," we think....

The Web of Wanton Cruelty: Trolling Turns Vicious

One afternoon in the spring of 2006, for reasons unknown to those who knew him, Mitchell Henderson, a seventh grader from Rochester, Minnesota, took a .22-caliber rifle down from a shelf in his parents' bedroom closet and shot himself in the head. The next morning, Mitchell's school assembled in the gym to begin mourning. His classmates created a virtual memorial on MySpace and garlanded it with...

With Automated Tagging, Web Links Can Surprise

It wasn't what anyone expected to see while perusing a news article. But there, in the final paragraph of an online story about the call girl involved in the Eliot Spitzer scandal, Yahoo's automated system was inviting readers to browse through photos of underage girls. Yahoo Shortcuts, which more frequently offers to help readers search for news and Web sites on topics like "California" or...

IOC Being Grilled on Internet Censorship in China

IOC president Jacques Rogge was accused of backtracking on promises of press freedoms Saturday and some Internet sites remained blocked less than a week before the Beijing Games begin. Under pressure from the International Olympic Committee, Chinese organizers unblocked some sites at the main press center and venues, but others remained censored for journalists covering the Summer Games....

Mixed Results for Growth Hormone in HIV Patients

A hormone better known for illicit use among athletes can help treat troublesome complications from the AIDS virus, but with potentially risky side effects, a small study found. Low-dose injections of human growth hormone, HGH, reduced fat deposits around internal abdominal organs by about 10 percent. In addition, hormone shots lowered blood pressure and levels of blood fats called...

Sealed Records Are Key to Anthrax Mystery

One of the nation's biggest unsolved mysteries could be resolved soon when the Justice Department discloses details of its investigation of a government scientist who committed suicide last week before he could be charged in the deadly anthrax attacks of 2001. The case against Bruce Ivins, who worked at an Army biodefense lab at Fort Detrick in Frederick, Md., is before a federal grand jury and...

Oil drops below $120 (AFP)

AFP - World oil prices fell below 120 dollars a barrel on Tuesday, a day after hitting the trough for the first time for three months, as slowing US demand for energy offsets tensions over crude-rich Iran, traders...

Big Yahoo shareholder demands review of board vote

(AP) -- A major Yahoo Inc. shareholder has asked for a review of how its votes were cast in last week's re-election of the Internet company's board, raising questions about whether the opposition to the directors may have been understated.

Evaluating ecosystem services

Environmental conservation efforts have traditionally focused on protecting individual species or natural resources. Scientists are discovering, however, that preserving the benefits that whole ecosystems provide to people is more economically and environmentally valuable. At the Annual Meeting of the Ecological Society of America (ESA), ecologists will explore the application of ecosystem...

Human brains pay a price for being big

Metabolic changes responsible for the evolution of our unique cognitive abilities indicate that the brain may have been pushed to the limit of its capabilities. Research published today in BioMed Central's open access journal Genome Biology adds weight to the theory that schizophrenia is a costly by-product of human brain evolution.

Lowering cholesterol early in life could save lives

With heart disease maintaining top billing as the leading cause of death in the United States, a team of University of California, San Diego School of Medicine physician-researchers is proposing that aggressive intervention to lower cholesterol levels as early as childhood is the best approach available today to reducing the incidence of coronary heart disease.