244 articles from FRIDAY 14.2.2020

NASA catches the re-birth of zombie tropical cyclone Francisco

The low-pressure area that had once been Tropical Cyclone Francisco has been lingering in the Southern Indian Ocean since Feb. 6 when it weakened below tropical cyclone status. Since then, Francisco's remnants moved into an area of warm waters and low wind shear allowing the low-pressure area to re-organize, consolidate and re-form. NASA's Aqua satellite provided forecasters with a visible image...

Set your alarm: Moon, Mars and Earth to align before dawn on Tuesday

An eclipse-like event will cause Mars to vanish from the sky over North America early Tuesday morning in a rare event known to astronomers as a lunar occultation.Similar to an eclipse when the Earth, moon and sun fall in line, during an occultation, the Earth, moon and a planet align. As a result, the Red Planet will be hidden from sight as it appears to pass directly behind the moon during...

Experts weigh in on how coronavirus may, or may not, run rampant in US in coming months

The coronavirus, officially known as COVID-19, has infected more than 60,000, killed over 1,300 and terrified millions. In the United States, residents wait with bated breath as new cases of infected Americans arise. Also worth noting is that more than 7,000 patients diagnosed with the virus have recovered, according to data from Johns Hopkins University.On Thursday, the 15th U.S. case of...

Rare bats in decline

A study led by Susan Tsang, a former Fulbright Research Fellow from The City College of New York, reveals dwindling populations and widespread hunting throughout Indonesia and the Philippines of the world's largest bats, known as flying foxes.

ICYMI: Blizzard, cold and flooding rains roil parts of U.S., and heavy rains nearly ends Australia's bushfire catastrophe

It was a frigid week for several spots across the United States as blizzards hindered travel on slick and slushy roadways for many drivers. Meanwhile, the flooding in the Deep South led to a rather unfortunate side effect in Alabama, and some much-needed good news has risen from the ashes of the devastating Australia bushfires. Here's a look back at the week in weather.Brutal blizzard, frigid...

Delta hopes to be the first carbon neutral airline

BP isn't the only company hoping to go carbon neutral despite its dependence on fossil fuels. Delta has unveiled a goal to become the first carbon neutral airline in the world, with the company promising $1 billion over 10 years to help "mitigate" all its CO2 emissions. This will include more efficient aircraft (including sustainable fuel) and less overall jet fuel use. It'll...

As Sea Levels Rise, Scientists Offer a Bold Idea: Dam the North Sea

LONDON -- One dam would stretch some 300 miles from the coast of Scotland to Norway. The other, roughly 100 miles, would rise in the waters between northern France and Southeastern England.Together, the mammoth structures proposed by scientists would completely enclose the North Sea and offer protection for tens of millions of Europeans threatened by rising sea levels caused by climate change.The...

Repeating weather pattern to breed more snow across Great Lakes, New England early this week

Just as many storms have done this winter, a new system will track from the Plains into the Great Lakes and northern New England early this week and produce another swath of snow.The storm will first take aim at the Rockies, whitening the ground in Denver on Monday night and producing upwards of a foot of snow in the highest elevations of central Colorado.The weather pattern feels like the movie...

Researchers were not right about left brains

The left and right side of the brain are involved in different tasks. This functional lateralization and associated brain asymmetry are well documented in humans. Scientists now challenge the long-held notion that the human pattern of brain asymmetry is unique. They found the same asymmetry pattern in chimpanzees, gorillas, and orangutans. However, humans were the most variable in this pattern....

Low-cost 'smart' diaper can notify caregiver when it's wet

Researchers have developed a ''smart'' diaper embedded with a moisture sensor that can alert a caregiver when a diaper is wet. When the sensor detects dampness in the diaper, it sends a signal to a nearby receiver, which in turn can send a notification to a smartphone or computer.

Device mimics brain cells used for human vision

In a study featured as the cover article appearing today in the journal Science Advances, a UCF research team showed that by combining two promising nanomaterials into a new superstructure, they could create a nanoscale device that mimics the neural pathways of brain cells used for human vision.

How did dinosaur parents know when their kids had a fever?

From the time that dinosaur fossils were first discovered, these creatures have fascinated scientists and laypeople alike. In the academic world, their remains provide important clues into the prehistoric world; in popular culture, dinosaurs have inspired blockbuster hits, such as Jurassic Park and King Kong.