332 articles from THURSDAY 21.5.2020

UK coronavirus test with 20-minute wait being trialled

Trial for test, separate to antibody test, involves 4,000 people and will run for six weeksCoronavirus – latest updatesSee all our coronavirus coverageThe government has announced the start of trials for a new test to see if people have coronavirus, with results processed on site within 20 minutes.The news came as the health secretary, Matt Hancock, said the UK had made a deal to receive up to...

Biophysicists find a way to take a peek at how membrane receptors work

In a study published in Current Opinion in Structural Biology, MIPT biophysicists explained ways to visualize membrane receptors in their different states. Detailed information on the structure and dynamics of these proteins will enable developing effective and safe drugs to treat many sorts of conditions.

Tropical forests can handle the heat, up to a point

Tropical forests face an uncertain future under climate change, but new research published in Science suggests they can continue to store large amounts of carbon in a warmer world, if countries limit greenhouse gas emissions.

Australian researchers claim world first in global race to develop better solar panels

Experimental cell using the potentially game-changing material perovskite passes a series of heat and humidity testsA team of Australian researchers are claiming a world first in a global race to develop cheaper, more flexible and more efficient solar panels after their experimental cell passed a series of heat and humidity tests.Using a type of crystal material known as perovskite, the group...

Scientists boost microwave signal stability a hundredfold

Researchers at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) have used state-of-the-art atomic clocks, advanced light detectors, and a measurement tool called a frequency comb to boost the stability of microwave signals 100-fold. This marks a giant step toward better electronics to enable more accurate time dissemination, improved navigation, more reliable communications and...

Just 7.3% of Stockholm had Covid-19 antibodies by end of April, study shows

Official findings add to concerns about Sweden’s laissez-faire strategy towards the pandemicCoronavirus – latest updatesSee all our coronavirus coverageJust 7.3% of Stockholm’s inhabitants had developed Covid-19 antibodies by the end of April, according to a study, raising concerns that the country’s light-touch approach to the coronavirus may not be helping it build up broad immunity.The...

NASA Science Live: Episode 4 - Storms Across the Solar System

Did you know that there are storms churning all across our solar system and beyond? Watch as we tour some of the storms in our planetary neighborhood – from supersonic winds on Venus to dust storms on Mars. Then, we bring things closer to home to take a look at how NASA studies weather on Earth. Video...

Aligned, high-density semiconducting carbon nanotube arrays for high-performance electronics

Single-walled carbon nanotubes (CNTs) may enable the fabrication of integrated circuits smaller than 10 nanometers, but this would require scalable production of dense and electronically pure semiconducting nanotube arrays on wafers. We developed a multiple dispersion and sorting process that resulted in extremely high semiconducting purity and a dimension-limited self-alignment (DLSA) procedure...

Bumble bees damage plant leaves and accelerate flower production when pollen is scarce

Maintaining phenological synchrony with flowers is a key ecological challenge for pollinators that may be exacerbated by ongoing environmental change. Here, we show that bumble bee workers facing pollen scarcity damage leaves of flowerless plants and thereby accelerate flower production. Laboratory studies revealed that leaf-damaging behavior is strongly influenced by pollen availability and that...

Coherent optical clock down-conversion for microwave frequencies with 10-18 instability

Optical atomic clocks are poised to redefine the Système International (SI) second, thanks to stability and accuracy more than 100 times better than the current microwave atomic clock standard. However, the best optical clocks have not seen their performance transferred to the electronic domain, where radar, navigation, communications, and fundamental research rely on less stable microwave...