5,993 articles from JUNE 2020

Kirigami grips could help seniors keep their footing

Researchers at the Harvard John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences (SEAS) and MIT have developed pop-up shoe grips, inspired by snake skin, that can increase friction between the shoe and the ground. The assistive grips could be used, among other things, to reduce the risk of falling among older adults.

Latest climate models show more intense droughts to come

An analysis of new climate model projections by Australian researchers from the ARC Centre of Excellence for Climate Extremes shows southwestern Australia and parts of southern Australia will see longer and more intense droughts due to a lack of rainfall caused by climate change. But Australia is not alone. Across the globe, several important agricultural and forested regions in the Amazon,...

Lessening water quality problems caused by hurricane-related flooding

June 1 is the start of hurricane season in the Atlantic, and with 2020 predicted to be particularly active, residents in coastal regions are keeping watchful eyes on the weather. Flooding is often the most damaging effect of tropical storms, and it can disproportionately affect vulnerable people and ecosystems. Now, in ACS' Environmental Science & Technology, researchers study water quality...

Making matter out of light: High-power laser simulations point the way

Engineers at UC San Diego developed a set of simulations involving high-power lasers that could help us recreate the transformation of light into matter, and better understand what happened at the very beginning of the universe. The study offers a recipe for researchers at the Extreme Light Infrastructure (ELI) high-power laser facility to follow to produce pairs of matter and antimatter particles...

Measuring climate change

University of Delaware professor Wei-Jun Cai teamed with the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) scientists, as well as professors and professionals from numerous research institutes, to conduct an in-depth study that looks at carbon dioxide uptake and ocean acidification in the coastal oceans of North America.

New biosensor visualizes stress in living plant cells in real time

Plant biologists have developed a new nanosensor that monitors foundational mechanisms related to stress and drought. The new biosensor allows researchers to analyze changes in real time as they happen involving kinases, enzymes that catalyze key biological activities in proteins. Certain kinases are essential since they are known to be activated in response to drought conditions, triggering the...

New review helps translate probiotic science into practical primary care recommendations

Probiotic supplements are widely available and are promoted as a general way to support the gut microbiome and promote health. A new publication in the Journal of Family Practice summarizes the latest evidence on using probiotics for a variety of specific health conditions, providing practical recommendations to assist primary care physicians in advising their patients. The article, authored by...

New study provides maps, ice favorability index to companies looking to mine the moon

A University of Central Florida team has created an Ice Favorability Index. The geological model explains the process for ice formation at the poles of the moon, and mapped the terrain, which includes craters that may hold ice deposits. The model, which has been published in the peer-reviewed journal Icarus, accounts for what asteroid impacts on the surface of the moon may do to deposits of ice...

New test method can offer safer dosages of hydroxychloroquine

Researchers at Uppsala University and Uppsala University Hospital have developed a new method to measure levels of the medication hydroxychloroquine in patients with the rheumatic disease systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). The analysis method may also be useful in other areas, such as in the treatment of COVID-19. The study is being published in Arthritis Research and Therapy.

Orbital ordering triggers nucleation-growth behavior of electrons in an inorganic solid

A new study by researchers from Waseda University and the University of Tokyo found that orbital ordering in a vanadate compound exhibits a clear nucleation-growth behavior. Their observation is the first of its kind, where electrons in an inorganic solid created two soft phases, and where the nucleation-growth behavior was observed due to the surface tension created between the phases.

Reducing inflammation boosts cognitive recovery after stroke, may extend treatment window

Reperfusion therapy, the gold standard in stroke treatment, returns blood flow to the affected brain area and must be administered within four hours of stroke to minimize hemorrhage risk. Even with successful return of blood flow, full brain function recovery is rare. Medical University of South Carolina researchers have shown in a preclinical stroke model that adding a unique compound to reduce...