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514 articles from EurekAlert

A titanate nanowire mask that can eliminate pathogens

Researchers in Lásló Forró's lab at EPFL, Switzerland, are working on a membrane made of titanium oxide nanowires, similar in appearance to filter paper but with antibacterial and antiviral properties. Their material works by using the photocatalytic properties of titanium dioxide: when exposed to ultraviolet radiation, the fibers convert resident moisture into oxidizing agents such as...

Adding another dimension to a cell culture model for pulmonary arterial hypertension

Pulmonary arterial hypertension is a rare disease in which excessive proliferation of the cells of pulmonary arterial walls obstructs the blood flow in the lungs. A group of scientists based in Okayama, Japan, has now used 3D cell culture technology to recapitulate the pathogenetic process involved in pulmonary arterial hypertension in the laboratory, with potential applications in drug testing.

COVID recovery choices shape future climate

A new international study, led by the University of Leeds, warns that even with some lockdown measures staying in place to the end of 2021, without more structural interventions global temperatures will only be roughly 0.01°C lower than expected by 2030. However, the study estimates that including climate policy measures as part of an economic recovery plan with strong green stimulus could...

COVID-19 - The virus and the vasculature

In severe cases of COVID-19, the infection can lead to obstruction of the blood vessels in the lung, heart and kidneys. Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet (LMU) in Munich researchers have now shown that activated immune cells and blood platelets play a major role in these pathologies.

Experts urge evaluation of diet at routine check-ups

Unhealthy dietary patterns are a leading cause of heart disease and stroke as well as other chronic diseases.Clinician-delivered diet counseling can improve diet behaviors and heart disease risk factors.Quick, simple dietary assessment tools can be a part of routine office visits and integrated into electronic health records for follow-up.

Hubble makes the first observation of a total lunar eclipse by a space telescope

Taking advantage of a total lunar eclipse, astronomers using the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope have detected ozone in Earth's atmosphere. This method serves as a proxy for how they will observe Earth-like planets around other stars in the search for life. This is the first time a total lunar eclipse was captured from a space telescope and the first time such an eclipse has been studied in...

Huge ring-like structure on Ganymede's surface may have been caused by violent impact

Image data reanalysis by researchers from Kobe University and the National Institute of Technology, Oshima College have revealed that ancient tectonic troughs are concentrically distributed across almost the entire surface of Ganymede. Computer simulation results suggest that this giant crater could have resulted from the impact of an asteroid with a 150km radius. If so, this the largest impact...

New Zealand's Southern Alps glacier melt has doubled

Glaciers in the Southern Alps of New Zealand have lost more ice mass since pre-industrial times than remains today, according to a new study led by the University of Leeds. The study mapped Southern Alps ice loss from the end of the Little Ice Age -- roughly 400 years ago -- to 2019. It found that relative to recent decades, the Southern Alps lost up to 77% of their total Little Ice Age glacier...

NSD2 enzyme appears to prevent cellular senescence

Using comprehensive genetic analysis, Kumamoto University researchers have found, for the first time, that the NSD2 enzyme blocks cell aging. Inhibition of NSD2 function in normal cells leads to rapid senescence of cells and the amount of NSD2 in senescent cells is significantly reduced. It is hoped that these findings will help clarify the mechanisms of aging, the development of control methods...

Origins of life: Chemical evolution in a tiny Gulf Stream

Chemical reactions driven by the geological conditions on the early Earth might have led to the prebiotic evolution of self-replicating molecules. Scientists at Ludwig-Maximilians Universitaet (LMU) in Munich now report on a hydrothermal mechanism that could have promoted the process.

Renewables in Europe: Land requirements can be reduced at low cost

Transitioning our energy supply from coal, oil and gas to wind and solar power is feasible. However, renewables require more land than conventional forms of energy generation. A new study explores the options to reduce the land requirements of a fully renewable energy supply in Europe and their possible impact on the cost of electricity.

Researchers discover how plants distinguish beneficial from harmful microbes

Plants recognize beneficial microbes and keep harmful ones out, which is important for healthy plants production and global food security. Scientists have now discovered how legumes use small, well-defined motifs in receptor proteins to read molecular signals produced by both pathogenic and symbiotic microbes. These remarkable findings have enabled the researchers to reprogram immune receptors...

Smartwatch tracks medication levels to personalize treatments

Engineers at the UCLA Samueli School of Engineering and their colleagues at Stanford School of Medicine have demonstrated that drug levels inside the body can be tracked in real time using a custom smartwatch that analyzes the chemicals found in sweat. This wearable technology could be incorporated into a more personalized approach to medicine -- where an ideal drug and dosages can be tailored to...

Stellar egg hunt with ALMA

Astronomers using the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) took a census of stellar eggs in the constellation Taurus and revealed their evolution state. This census helps researchers understand how and when a stellar embryo transforms to a baby star deep inside a gaseous egg. In addition, the team found a bipolar outflow, a pair of gas streams, that could be telltale evidence of a...

Success in promoting plant growth for biodiesel

Scientists of Waseda University in Japan succeeded in promoting plant growth and increasing seed yield by heterologous expression of protein from Arabidopsis (artificially modified high-speed motor protein) in Camelina sativa, which is expected as a useful plant for biodiesel. The study is expected to apply to other plant resources for biodiesel, such as corn, rice, and sugar cane.