319 articles from MONDAY 10.5.2021

Molecular tweezers that attack antibiotic resistant bacteria developed by Ben-Gurion U.

Prof. Jelinek, who is also BGUs vice president of Research & Development and a member of the Ilse Katz Institute for Nanoscale Science and Technology explained, "The tweezers are just like your home tweezers but a million times smaller, and instead of plucking hairs they attack fibers of the bacteria's biofilm." By doing that they break the biofilm, making it more vulnerable to human immune...

Monash study may help boost peptide design

Peptides play a vital role with a huge range of medical uses including in antibiotics and anti-cancer drugs. Altering the structure of natural peptides to improve compounds is of great interest to scientists and industry. But how these peptides are produced still isn't clearly understood. Monash University researchers have revealed a key aspect of peptide machineries in a paper published in...

New mapping technique reveals epigenetic drivers of cancers

Scientists have made major advances in understanding and developing treatments for many cancers by identifying genetic mutations that drive the disease. Now a team led by researchers at Weill Cornell Medicine, NewYork-Presbyterian and the New York Genome Center (NYGC) has developed a machine learning technique for detecting other modifications to DNA that have a similar effect.

New theory may revolutionize treatment of endometriosis

Endometriosis, a disease found in up to 10 per cent of women, has been enigmatic since it was first described. A new theory developed by researchers at Simon Fraser University suggests a previously overlooked hormone -- testosterone -- has a critical role in its development. The research could have direct impacts on diagnosis and treatment of the disease, signaling hope for women with...

New tools enable rapid analysis of coronavirus sequences and tracking of variants

Widespread sequencing of SARS-CoV-2 genomes presents new opportunities for tracing global and local transmission dynamics, but analyzing so much genomic data is challenging. The sheer number of coronavirus genome sequences and their rapid accumulation makes it hard to place new sequences on a "family tree" showing how they are all related. But researchers at the UC Santa Cruz Genomics Institute...

New vaccine blocks COVID-19 and variants, plus other coronaviruses

A potential new vaccine developed by members of the Duke Human Vaccine Institute has proven effective in protecting monkeys and mice from a variety of coronavirus infections -- including SARS-CoV-2 as well as the original SARS-CoV-1 and related bat coronaviruses that could potentially cause the next pandemic.

Of mice and spacemen: Understanding muscle wasting at the molecular level

Skeletal muscles undergo atrophy, or wasting, under conditions of reduced gravity, such as during spaceflight. Researchers from the University of Tsukuba explored the effects of microgravity and artificial gravity (1 g) on mice housed at the International Space Station for 35 days. Artificial gravity successfully prevented the gross and molecular changes observed in the muscles of mice subjected...

Once we're past the fear stage, where do we place the blame for the COVID-19 pandemic?

In a recent study, conducted in Poland in 2020 and published in the peer-reviewed journal Social Psychological Bulletin, scientists concluded it was the government and the system that most of the participants attributed responsibility to for the COVID-19 incidence rates. Furthermore, political views and party preferences are reported to play an incomparably more significant role in their responses...

One-year results from the FUTURE-II trial

A decade already passed from the first use of bioresorbable vascular scaffold in percutaneous coronary interventions. The first studies - by using surrogate endpoints - showed some superiority of BRS vs. metallic drug-eluting stent in terms of the so-called vascular restoration therapy with recovery of vasomotion and vascular pulsatility when the scaffold was absorbed....

Parallel universes cross in Flatland

Physics researchers at the University of Bath discover that assembling 2D materials into a 3D arrangement does not just result in 'thicker' 2D materials but instead produces entirely new materials. The nanomesh technologically pioneered at Bath is simple to produce and offers tunable material properties to meet the demands of future applications. The team's next goal is to use the nanomesh on...

Point-of-care ultrasonography offers enormous advantages in acute diagnostics

Point-of-Care UltraSonography deployed during the emergency treatment of patients with acute dyspnea has enormous advantages over standard diagnostic pathways. This is the finding of a joint review conducted by Danube University Krems and MedUni Vienna and recently published in the prestigious Annals of Internal Medicine. It allows serious conditions to be identified more quickly so that...

Rapid lifestyle changes during early COVID-19 pandemic had no impact on climate change

Despite the rapid and significant changes in consumption patterns witnessed during the initial months of the COVID-19 pandemic, Japanese households maintained their normal levels of greenhouse gases emissions. The "anthropause" -- reduction of human activity due to the pandemic -- made headlines last summer, but factory shutdowns and broken global supply chains did not translate into the adoption...

Reaching your life goals as a single-celled organism

How is it possible to move in the desired direction without a brain or nervous system? Single-celled organisms apparently manage this feat without any problems: for example, they can swim towards food with the help of small flagellar tails. A research team at TU Wien (Vienna) has now been able to simulate this process on the computer.

Research results challenge a decades-old mechanism of how we hear sounds

Researchers at Linköping University, Sweden, have made several discoveries on the functioning mechanisms of the inner hair cells of the ear, which convert sounds into nerve signals that are processed in the brain. The results, presented in the scientific journal Nature Communications, challenge the current picture of the anatomical organisation and workings of the hearing organ, which has...

Researchers in Sweden develop light emitters for quantum circuits

The promise of a quantum internet depends on the complexities of harnessing light to transmit quantum information over fiber optic networks. A potential step forward was reported today by researchers in Sweden who developed integrated chips that can generate light particles on demand and without the need for extreme refrigeration.