146 articles from FRIDAY 29.10.2021

River beds that can shift naturally are more efficient carbon sinks than straightened rivers

It takes about 8500 years for a grain of sand from the Andes to be washed across the Argentine lowlands into the Río Paraná. The 1200-kilometer journey in the river called Río Bermejo is interrupted by many stops in river floodplains, where the grain is deposited, sometimes over thousands of years, and then washed free again. The sand is accompanied by organic carbon, washed in from soil and...

Detector advance could lead to cheaper, easier medical scans

Researchers in the U.S. and Japan have demonstrated the first experimental cross-sectional medical image that doesn't require tomography, a mathematical process used to reconstruct images in CT and PET scans . The work, published Oct. 14 in Nature Photonics, could lead to cheaper, easier and more accurate medical imaging.

Is it worth trying to sway the most staunch climate deniers?

Thanks to algorithms that learn about social media users' content preferences, Facebook timelines, Twitter feeds, suggested YouTube videos, and other news streams can look startlingly different from one person's online account to the next. Media and communication experts often wrestle with how to rein in the forces that further polarize people with different views, especially people who sit on...

Morro Bay seagrass loss causes change in fish populations

The loss of seagrass habitat caused a dramatic shift in fish species in Morro Bay. Areas once covered with lush seagrass meadows and unique fish species are now home to muddy-seafloor-loving flatfish, according to a paper by Cal Poly researchers published in the October 2021 print edition of Estuaries and Coasts.

WA shipwreck reveals secrets of 17th -century Dutch seafaring domination

Many Dutch ships passed the West Australian coast while enroute to Southeast Asia in the 1600s—and the national heritage listed shipwreck, Batavia, has revealed through its timbers the history of the shipbuilding materials that enabled Dutch East India Company (VOC) to flourish against major European rivals for the first time.

The FDA Just Authorized Pfizer’s COVID-19 Vaccine For Kids Age 5 to 11

WASHINGTON (AP)—The Food and Drug Administration on Friday paved the way for children ages 5 to 11 to get Pfizer’s COVID-19 vaccine. The FDA cleared kid-size doses—just a third of the amount given to teens and adults—for emergency use, and up to 28 million more American children could be eligible for vaccinations as early as next week. One more regulatory hurdle remains:...

Cause of Alzheimer’s progression in the brain

For the first time, researchers have used human data to quantify the speed of different processes that lead to Alzheimer's disease and found that it develops in a very different way than previously thought. Their results could have important implications for the development of potential treatments.

Shipwreck reveals secrets of 17th -century Dutch seafaring domination

Many Dutch ships passed the West Australian coast while enroute to Southeast Asia in the 1600s -- and the national heritage listed shipwreck, Batavia, has revealed through its timbers the history of the shipbuilding materials that enabled Dutch East India Company (VOC) to flourish against major European rivals for the first time.

Honeybees use social distancing when mites threaten hives – study

Foraging bees keep away from centre of colony when infested with mites, find researchersIn the past 18 months humans have become all too familiar with the term “social distancing”. But it turns out we are not the only ones to give our peers a wide berth when our health may be at risk: research suggests honeybees do it too.Scientists have found that when a hive of honeybees is under threat from...

This squirrel watches its neighbor's back

Unlike meerkats that take individual turns watching for predators while the rest forage, Barbary ground squirrels found off the coast of Africa stand sentry together -- a behavior called synchronous vigilance, according to a new study.

Morro Bay seagrass loss causes change in fish populations

The loss of seagrass habitat caused a dramatic shift in fish species in Morro Bay. Areas once covered with lush seagrass meadows and unique fish species are now home to muddy-seafloor-loving flatfish. The research team saw decreasing numbers of seagrass-specialist fish species, and an increase in flatfishes like the speckled sanddab and staghorn sculpin. The loss of eelgrass habitat along the...