14 articles from SUNDAY 8.5.2022

Dangers of species to species transplants | Letter

Dr Julia Baines of Peta argues that advanced computer modelling and engineered human and plant tissues are far more accurate than these experimentsPeta scientists have consistently warned that animal-to-human transplants risk transmitting dangerous viruses, so the news that a pig virus may have contributed to the death of David Bennett, the world’s first human recipient of a pig heart, was sadly...

British scientist says US anti-abortion lawyers misused his work to attack Roe v Wade

Giandomenico Iannetti, a pain expert at UCL, angrily denies that his research suggests foetuses can feel pain before 24 weeksA University College London scientist has accused lawyers in the US of misusing his groundbreaking work on the brain to justify the dismantling of Roe v Wade, the landmark ruling that legalised abortion nationally in America.Giandomenico Iannetti said his research, which...

Cynics masquerade as wise, but they’re doing everyone a disservice | Torsten Bell

Their world-weary attitude deceives others into believing they’re better at their jobs than they areBeing cynical about other people’s motivations – assuming that everyone acts only out of self-interest – is all the rage these days. But, let’s be honest, people who are universally cynical are also tiresome and dull. No one wants a colleague, let alone a friend, who can’t really trust...

Preventable by Devi Sridhar review – inside the fog of war on Covid

A survey of the global response to coronavirus draws together fascinating data but fails to construct a compelling narrative about the spread of the virusAt the end of her wide-ranging analysis of the pandemic, Devi Sridhar, professor of global public health at the University of Edinburgh, Guardian columnist and Good Morning Britain contributor, raises the dark question of whether Covid-19 will...

Magnets made by soil bacteria offer hope for breast and prostate cancer

Scientists at Sheffield University have found a novel way of guiding anti-tumour viruses to their targetScientists are developing magnetically guided microscopic projectiles that can be injected into patients’ blood to attack breast, prostate and other tumours. The project – led by researchers at Sheffield University – builds on progress in two key medical fields. The first involves viruses...

Sweden? Japan? UK? Debates over who had a ‘good’ Covid won’t end | Francois Balloux

The WHO has spoken but even its huge new report will not settle arguments about pandemic strategiesNational Covid death rates are, inevitably, political. How could they not be when they are viewed as evidence for good or bad government on matters of life or death? How did the UK fare compared with, say, Germany? Should both countries have been more like Sweden? However, when new data arrives, far...