189 articles from TUESDAY 14.6.2022

Evidence that early galaxies may be bigger and more complex than previously thought

Scientists using the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA)— an international observatory co-operated by the U.S. National Science Foundation's National Radio Astronomy Observatory (NRAO)—have observed a significant amount of cold, neutral gas in the outer regions of the young galaxy A1689-zD1, as well as outflows of hot gas coming from the galaxy's center. These results may shed...

Genome-wide introgression between two sympatric Asian oak species

The genus Quercus, commonly known as oaks, is one of the most evolutionarily successful genera in the Northern Hemisphere in terms of species diversity, biomass and distribution range. Oaks can usually live up to a few hundred years, and during the long lifespan they exhibit high tolerance to various abiotic and biotic threats. Meanwhile, oaks are also well known for their extensive interspecific...

A weird star produced the fastest nova on record

Astronomers are buzzing after observing the fastest nova ever recorded. The unusual event drew scientists' attention to an even more unusual star. As they study it, they may find answers to not only the nova's many baffling traits, but to larger questions about the chemistry of our solar system, the death of stars and the evolution of the universe.

Developing sustainable membranes for future energy

A recently published paper in Science "Polytriazole membranes with ultrathin tunable selective layer for crude oil fractionation," offers an innovative membrane development solution to handle unique industrial conditions, such as hydrocarbon fractionation.

What shedding light on plant growth could mean for cancer

Understanding how plants process light is key to improving crop yields. Light helps plants know when to grow and flower at the right time. Plants find light using proteins called photoreceptors. Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory (CSHL) Assistant Professor Ullas Pedmale's team uncovered how proteins called UBP12 and UBP13 help regulate a photoreceptor called CRY2. Published in Current Biology, their...

Rural areas will bear the brunt of US sea-level rise

It's hotly debated whether coastal wetlands can survive sea-level rise by migrating inland. A new analysis using highly detailed elevation maps of the Chesapeake Bay region shows that—contrary to previous studies—human barriers will do little to slow this marsh migration. Instead, extensive areas of low-lying rural land will allow coastal marshes to persist or even expand as salty water creeps...

A warming climate decreases microbial diversity, study finds

Researchers at the University of Oklahoma have found that the warming climate is decreasing microbial diversity, which is essential for soil health. Led by Jizhong Zhou, Ph.D., the director of the Institute for Environmental Genomics at OU, the research team conducted an eight-year experiment that found that climate warming played a predominant role in shaping microbial biodiversity, with...

Citizen Scientists and VR Software Help Find New Insights in NASA Data

Portal origin URL: Citizen Scientists and VR Software Help Find New Insights in NASA DataPortal origin nid: 480669Published: Tuesday, June 14, 2022 - 16:15Featured (stick to top of list): noPortal text teaser: Citizen Scientists and VR Software Help Find New Insights in NASA DataPortal image: A young star surrounded by a disk of gas and...

Study explores uncertainties in flood risk estimates

Flood frequency analysis is a technique used to estimate flood risk, providing statistics such as the "100-year flood" or "500-year flood" that are critical to infrastructure design, dam safety analysis, and flood mapping in flood-prone areas. But the method used to calculate these flood frequencies is due for an update, according to a new study by scientists from The Desert Research Institute...

'Alternative facts' are cons, and journalists can help quash them, new paper argues

Journalists need not cover both sides of an argument when one side is advancing what experts widely regard as a con, Illinois Institute of Technology John and Mae Calamos Endowed Chair in Philosophy J. D. Trout argues in his latest publication. "The Epistemic Virtues of a Closed Mind: Effective Science Reporting in the Golden Age of the Con" appears in Frontiers in Communication: Science and...

Double-layered catalyst generates more hydrogen

Hydrogen-generating catalysts can create synergistic effects when different materials are layered with their unique properties. Recently, a Korean research team has developed a technology to enhance the hydrogen generation efficiency by flattening platinum (Pt) over the surface of NiFe-layered double hydroxide (LDH).

New study determines that Catalonia's anchovies are healthy and free of the parasite Anisakis

A study conducted by the research group SEAaq (Ecosystem and Aquatic Animal Health) of the Department of Animal Biology, Plant Biology and Ecology at the Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona (UAB) and published in the journal Science of The Total Environment has focused on the analysis of the state of health of anchovies found in different points of the Catalan coast (Tarragona, Barcelona and...