179 articles from WEDNESDAY 5.10.2022

Some everyday materials have memories, and now they can be erased

Some solid materials have a memory of how they have previously been stretched out, which impacts how they respond to these kinds of deformations in the future. A new study lends insight into memory formation in the foams and emulsions common in food products and pharmaceuticals and provides a new method to erase this memory, which could guide how materials are prepared for future use.

Fixed-duration strikes can revitalize labor

"Fixed-duration" strikes—such as the three-day walkout by 15,000 nurses in mid-September—protect worker interests and impose financial and reputational costs on employers, suggesting that confrontational tactics can help unions counteract increasing employer power, according to new Cornell University ILR School research.

NASA study finds climate extremes affect landslides in surprising ways

Climate change is driving more volatile precipitation patterns around the world—very dry stretches punctuated by storms that drop large amounts of rain or snow in a short amount of time. While wetter and drier spells may have certain effects that are easy to predict, such as on water levels in lakes and rivers, a recent study focused on California reveals that they can affect slow-moving...

Some everyday materials have memories, and now they can be erased

Some solid materials have a memory of how they have previously been stretched out, which impacts how they respond to these kinds of deformations in the future. A new Penn State study lends insight into memory formation in the foams and emulsions common in food products and pharmaceuticals and provides a new method to erase this memory, which could guide how materials are prepared for future use.

Utilizing chemo-mechanical oscillations to mimic protocell behavior in manufactured microcapsules

The complexity of life on Earth was derived from simplicity: From the first protocells to the growth of any organism, individual cells aggregate into basic clumps and then form more complex structures. The earliest cells lacked complicated biochemical machinery; to evolve into multicellular organisms, simple mechanisms were necessary to produce chemical signals that prompted the cells to both move...

Inside a battery recycling facility

Hello and welcome to the first-ever edition of The Spark! Thanks so much for joining me for this weekly climate newsletter, where we’ll explore tech that could help combat the climate crisis. I’m so glad you’re here! This week, we’re kicking things off with a special travel edition of the newsletter. So buckle up, because we’re headed to the mountains just outside Reno, Nevada to...

‘I’m extremely disturbed’: Harsh crackdown at top Iranian university shocks academics worldwide

Sunday’s brutal crackdown against students protesting at one of Iran’s most prestigious universities has shocked Iranian academics and students around the world. The attack, at the Sharif University of Technology in Tehran, also drove home the important role students and universities are playing in the popular uprising against the Iranian government. Protests at many other...

What Climate Change Means For Africa’s Food Crisis

The African continent is no stranger to famine. In the 1970s and ‘80s, countries across the Sahel plunged into a drought-induced food crisis. In the mid-80s, an estimated one million people died from food shortages in Ethiopia. Somalia faced widespread famine in the ‘90s. Both those countries, along with neighboring East Africa nations, have suffered persistent food insecurity in the...

Logging down the value chain raises future forest sustainability concerns

Over a 50-year period, logging on British Columbia's Central Coast preferentially targeted the highest value locations on the landscape, according to new research from Simon Fraser University. The systematic depletion of high-value components of the environment raises concerns about future sustainability and intergenerational access to natural resources.

Researchers develop new tool for targeted cell control

Thanks to new RNA vaccines, we humans have been able to protect ourselves incredibly quickly from new viruses like SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19. These vaccines insert a piece of ephemeral genetic material into the body's cells, which then read its code and churn out a specific protein—in this case, telltale "spikes" that stud the outside of the coronavirus—priming the immune...

Logging down the value chain raises future forest sustainability concerns

Over a 50-year period, logging on B.C.'s Central Coast preferentially targeted the highest value locations on the landscape, according to new research. The systematic depletion of high-value components of the environment raises concerns about future sustainability and intergenerational access to natural resources. Led by SFU PhD graduate Jordan Benner and professor emeritus Ken Lertzman and...

Cleaner, more cost-effective way to make useful industrial chemicals

A team of researchers has developed a new, ecologically sensitive way to produce these nanocrystals through a process called high-humidity shaker aging. The new technique represents an advance over existing methods in that it costs less, uses less water, and eliminates the need for toxic solvents, all while producing higher yields.