21 articles from SATURDAY 25.11.2023

Bone cows bred in Australia provide base material for dental grafts

Use of cattle from country free of mad cow disease means product is safe, experts say, and patients can still donate bloodGet our morning and afternoon news emails, free app or daily news podcastBone cows, specially bred in mad cow-free Australia, are being used instead of human donors for dental and medical bone grafts.While bovine grafts have been tested for spinal fusion, foot reconstructions...

A new theory to explain the nature of volcanic fountaining

A multi-institutional team of Earth scientists, meteorologists, geologists and volcanologists has developed a new theory to explain the nature of volcanic fountaining. In their project, reported in the journal Nature Communications, the group studied the 2021 eruption of the Fagradalsfjall volcano in Iceland, which produced what some have described as spectacular examples of volcanic fountaining.

How the Moon formed

Once upon a time, our earliest ancestors, on the plains of Africa, gazed skyward and saw a bright Moon in our sky. Perhaps they wondered what it was and where it came from. The answers, however, took a very long time in coming. The brightest object in the night sky, a target of fascination andContinue reading "How the Moon formed" The post How the Moon formed appeared first on Astronomy...

Prenatal exposure to air pollution may hurt reproductive health in adult men, study finds

Ingestion of particulate matter may shorten distance between anus and genitals in the womb, a sign of lower testosterone activityIn-utero exposure to common air pollutants may lower semen quality and increase the risk of reproductive system disease in men, new research finds.The peer-reviewed Rutgers University study looked at whether exposure to particulate matter called 2.5 (PM2.5) and nitrogen...

‘Cultural vandalism’: row as Kew Gardens and Natural History Museum plan to move collections out of London

Scientific specimens and research facilities set to be rehoused in Reading University science park, alongside British Museum archiveIt is intended to be a world-leading research facility that will house some of the UK’s greatest collections of historical, botanical and zoological samples. Millions of ancient mosaics and pieces of sculpture, rare plant specimens and fossil remnants will be taken...