126 articles from MONDAY 19.2.2024

Could you travel through a black hole? This Week in Astronomy with Dave Eicher

Traveling into (or very near to) a black hole is the premise for a lot of fun science-fiction stories and films. But how far could you make it? Could you survive crossing the event horizon? And what awaits at the very center? The answer to the first question depends on what kind of black holeContinue reading "Could you travel through a black hole? This Week in Astronomy with Dave Eicher" The post...

This quasar eats one Sun a day for breakfast

Astrophysicists just spotted the brightest and fastest-growing supermassive black hole — and it turns out, it was hiding in plain sight for decades. Dubbed J0529-4351, the quasar was so bright that it was first dismissed as a star. Described in a paper published in Nature Astronomy, the quasar has a mass of 17 billion Suns and it’sContinue reading "This quasar eats one Sun a day for...

A new glue, potentially also for you

Hydrogels are already used in clinical practice for the delivery of drugs, and as lenses, bone cement, wound dressings, 3D scaffolds in tissue engineering and other applications. However, bonding different hydrogel polymers to one another has remained a challenge; yet it could enable numerous new applications. Now, researchers have pioneered a new method that uses a thin film of chitosan, a...

'I'm gonna get totally and utterly X'd': Can you really use any English word to mean 'drunk'?

The English language is famous for the large number of words that express the idea of being drunk in a humorous way—so-called drunkonyms like "pissed," "hammered" or "wasted." British comedian Michael McIntyre even argues in a comedy routine that posh people can use any word to mean "drunk" in English, e.g., "I was utterly gazeboed" or "I'm gonna get totally carparked." With the myriad of...

Scientists create method to bond hydrogels and other polymeric materials using chitosan

Hydrogels are versatile biomaterials conquering an increasing number of biomedical areas. Consisting of water-swollen molecular networks that can be tailored to mimic the mechanical and chemical features of various organs and tissues, they can interface within the body and on its outer surfaces without causing any damage to even the most delicate parts of the human anatomy.

Detecting atmospheric rivers with satellite observations

Atmospheric rivers (ARs) are filaments of intense moisture transport in the atmosphere. These weather systems drive a large fraction of the extreme precipitation events over coastal regions. Detecting ARs in satellite observations has long been a challenging task due to the lack of wind information. In a study published in the Journal of Geophysical Research: Atmospheres, scientists derived an...

Birds have been adapting to human activity for millennia, research suggests

Roughly 14,500 to 10,500 years ago, in the transition from the last glacial period, Epipaleolithic and Neolithic peoples harvesting vegetation from the wetlands of eastern Jordan created a habitat for birds that would otherwise have migrated, a new study published in the Journal of Archaeological Method and Theory reveals.

25 tips to take the best eclipse photos

Taking good eclipse photos is harder than it looks. The last Great American Eclipse, on Aug. 21, 2017, was photographed by hundreds of thousands of people — and many of them were probably disappointed in their results. Overexposure, blurriness, and camera malfunctions are all concerns if you aren’t prepared. Here are some tips you canContinue reading "25 tips to take the best eclipse photos"...

How to view the 2024 eclipse, a step-by-step planning guide

It’s been seven long years since the last total solar eclipse to grace the skies above North America occurred Aug. 21, 2017. Now, the Moon once again passes directly in front of the Sun from this continent. April 8 brings totality to viewers along a narrow path that begins on Mexico’s Pacific Coast and thenContinue reading "How to view the 2024 eclipse, a step-by-step planning guide" The post...

Maps of totality for the 2024 eclipse

After six years, seven months, and 18 days, a total eclipse of the Sun will once again cross North America. The total solar eclipse of April 8, 2024, will dazzle tens of millions of people from Mazatlán, Mexico, to the shores of Newfoundland, Canada, just north of St. John’s. The U.S. states touched by totalityContinue reading "Maps of totality for the 2024 eclipse" The post Maps of totality...