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20,957 articles from ScienceNOW

In massive underwater mountain range, scientists find more than 100 new species

Some 3000 meters underwater off the coast of Chile, striking purple, green, and orange sponges burst from the rocks. Sea urchins with maroon spines gather in colonies, while poppy-colored crustaceans pick their way among them. Transparent, ghostly creatures undulate in the dark. A team of researchers captured these and dozens of other never-before-seen species—more than 100 in...

Transgender men may still ovulate after hormone replacement therapy

Some transgender men who elect to medically transition receive testosterone through hormone replacement therapy (HRT), which can deepen their voice, alter fat and muscle distribution, increase hair growth, and halt their menstrual cycle. However, despite this end of menstruation, a study out today in Cell Reports Medicine shows that one-third of trans men continue to...


WEDNESDAY 21. FEBRUARY 2024


Powerful new antivenom raises hopes for a universal solution to lethal snakebites

Researchers have discovered a potent antibody that can neutralize a key type of neurotoxin produced by four different deadly snake species from South Asia, Southeast Asia, and Africa—a step toward an antivenom that could be used on any of the 200 or so dangerous venomous snakes throughout the world. “We are wiping out a major subclass of neurotoxins here,”...

Sweeping chronic fatigue study brings clues but not clarity to mysterious syndrome

The deepest dive yet into myalgic encephalomyelitis/chronic fatigue syndrome (ME/CFS) offers a complex view of this mysterious condition. ME/CFS produces crushing exhaustion, particularly after even mild exertion. Many patients struggle to find care, or doctors who believe their symptoms aren’t imagined. The new work, published this week in Nature Communications...


TUESDAY 20. FEBRUARY 2024


Proposed megafacility to breed monkeys in U.S. dismays activists and neighbors but excites scientists

Bainbridge, a rural town in southwestern Georgia with a population of 14,000, could soon become home to 30,000 additional residents: cynomolgus macaques. A new company called Safer Human Medicine (SHM) has announced plans to build an 80-hectare facility that would sell monkeys to universities, contract research organizations, and pharmaceutical companies that perform research on the...

‘Ethics is not a checkbox exercise.’ Bioinformatician Yves Moreau reacts to mass retraction of papers from China

Last week, bioinformatician Yves Moreau of KU Leuven scored an important victory: The journal Molecular Genetics & Genomic Medicine retracted 18 papers from Chinese institutions because of ethical concerns. Moreau has long waged a solo campaign against studies that fail to get proper free and informed consent when collecting genetic samples, especially from vulnerable...

Down syndrome identified in 2600-year-old infants through their DNA

Between 770 and 550 B.C.E., in a hilltop village called Alto de la Cruz near the modern Spanish city of Navarro, one infant girl received an unusual burial: Although people in Iron Age Spain usually cremated their dead, the girl was laid to rest beneath the floors of an elaborately decorated dwelling, with grave goods including bronze rings, a shell from the Mediterranean, and three whole...


MONDAY 19. FEBRUARY 2024


Quarter-million genomes analyzed in NIH project could be ‘hugely important’ for identifying disease risks

A giant research database with genetic and health data of people across the United States has hit its stride. Today, the All of Us study published an analysis of genomes and linked health information from nearly 250,000 participants whose diversity may be greater than that in any comparable biobank widely available for research. The National Institutes of Health (NIH)-funded effort,...


SATURDAY 17. FEBRUARY 2024


Lawmaker raises new flap over U.S.-funded virology research that critics call risky

A U.S. senator has thrown a political spotlight on yet another U.S.-Chinese research collaboration that critics suggest includes dangerous experiments that could create “superviruses” capable of sparking a pandemic. But contrary to assertions raised by Senator Joni Ernst (R–IA), none of the U.S. funding for the project goes to foreign researchers, and scientists who are part of the...

Lawmaker raises new flap over U.S.-funded virology research that critics call risky

A U.S. senator has thrown a political spotlight on yet another U.S.-Chinese research collaboration that critics suggest includes dangerous experiments that could create “superviruses” capable of sparking a pandemic. But contrary to assertions raised by Senator Joni Ernst (R–IA), none of the U.S. funding for the project goes to foreign researchers, and scientists who are part of the...


FRIDAY 16. FEBRUARY 2024


‘A tragic mistake’: Decision to close Duke University’s herbarium triggers furor

Duke University announced this week that its iconic 100-year-old herbarium will be closing in the next 2 or 3 years, a decision that immediately sparked protests from scientists at the university and elsewhere. Duke says the herbarium, home to 825,000 specimens, has become too expensive to maintain. The collection “is currently housed in outdated facilities that will require...

New Zealand scraps science reform plan, prompting fears of budget cuts

Scientists in New Zealand are criticizing the new government’s decision to cancel a multiyear reform plan to overhaul research funding and improve career opportunities. Researchers fear the move signals that the center-right coalition that came to power late last year will cut science funding as part of a broader push to reduce taxes and rein in government spending. “We are...

AI tells beavers apart by the ‘fingerprint’ patterns on their tails

Beavers rely on their leathery tails to steer while swimming and to loudly smack the water as an alarm call. A covering of lizardlike scales makes these tails so handy. It also provides a way to tell the animals apart. According to a study published this week in Ecology and Evolution , a computer algorithm can accurately identify individual beavers by the pattern of...

Why the White House is taking so long to issue new research security rules

Despite broad bipartisan agreement that U.S. academic research is vulnerable to threats from China, the White House remains deadlocked over how to implement a policy issued by former President Donald Trump’s administration in its last week that is intended to protect data, technology, and other fruits of federally funded scientific studies from foreign interference. University...


THURSDAY 15. FEBRUARY 2024


Watch a beetle larva ambush snails from below, dragging them to their demise

To shield themselves from predators, snails carry hard shells of calcium carbonate on their backs. But one wily hunter has found a way to worm around the snail’s famous defenses. On the Ryukyu Islands of southwestern Japan, the larva of a click beetle that nests underground waits until a snail passes overhead. Then it snags the snail’s soft gelatinous body from below, dragging the...

New biosecurity group aims to prevent biotech disasters

Biosecurity experts today launched a new international nonprofit designed to prevent modern biotechnology from causing harm. Known as the International Biosecurity and Biosafety Initiative for Science (IBBIS), the group aims to develop technological and policy guardrails to reduce the risk that biotech tools, such as the ability to synthesize and edit DNA, are accidentally or deliberately...

Seeking clear skies and quiet, astronomers put telescopes on U.S. Moon lander

A commercial spacecraft set off today carrying two small observatories that could showcase the potential of the Moon as an astronomical platform. One, an optical telescope, aims to demonstrate the viability of lunar astronomy and encourage exploration. The other, a radio telescope, will measure Earth’s reactions to solar flare-ups and look for a predicted “electron sheath” above the...


WEDNESDAY 14. FEBRUARY 2024


Mysterious ‘comb’ drawings may be among oldest cave paintings in South America

The soaring stone walls of Argentina’s Huenul Cave, a 630-meter-square rock shelter in northern Patagonia, are covered by nearly 900 distinct paintings of geometric shapes, people, and animals. In vivid shades of red, white, yellow, and black, their style resembles those of rock art found elsewhere in Patagonia, estimated to be a few thousand years old at most....

Rice covered in cow cells aims to provide nutritious, sustainable food

Scientists in South Korea have come up with an out-of-the-box idea for providing the world with nutritious, sustainable food: coating rice grains with cow cells . The advance, reported today in Matter , aims to provide an ever-growing human population with tasty meals while preserving land that would otherwise be needed to raise livestock ....

X-ray survey bolsters prevailing theory of universe’s expansion

The first x-ray survey of the universe in decades has cataloged and measured the biggest lumps in the cosmos: clusters of hundreds or thousands of galaxies. Their masses show how fast matter clumped together over cosmic history, and they tell a story that is at once satisfying and frustrating: The universe is about as lumpy as the standard cosmological theory predicts....

‘Tag!’ Other great apes share our affinity for playful teasing

Annoying siblings everywhere recognize the moves: the poke and run. The “I’m not touching you.” The “down low too slow” high-five fake out. It turns out at least four other species of great apes tease one another in similar ways, hinting at an ancient evolutionary origin for immature, good-natured bothering. Drawing on 75 hours of video recordings from habitats at the...


TUESDAY 13. FEBRUARY 2024


Mosquitoes may transmit West Nile virus to one another via feces

West Nile virus—the most common mosquito-transmitted disease in the United States—infects thousands of people every year, killing more than 2750 since it first appeared in the United States in 1999. It’s also becoming more of a concern in Europe and other parts of the world. Now, scientists say they’ve found a new way the virus can be transmitted, which may help explain why...

Vendor offering citations for purchase is latest bad actor in scholarly publishing

In 2023, a new Google Scholar profile appeared online featuring a researcher no one had ever heard of. Within a few months, the scientist, an expert in fake news, was listed by the scholarly database as their field’s 36th most cited researcher. They had an h-index of 19—meaning they’d published 19 academic articles that had been cited at least 19 times each. It was an impressive...


MONDAY 12. FEBRUARY 2024


Strange wall of stones found beneath Baltic Sea may have helped humans hunt reindeer

During a research cruise to map an underwater ridge off the German coast in 2021, Jacob Geersen and his students took acoustic scans of the bottom of the Baltic Sea. But something strange emerged from their images: A line of objects, 21 meters down, ran across the sea floor for nearly 1 kilometer. Most were between the size of a tennis ball and a soccer ball. Others were as large as small...

Spikes in air pollution may increase suicide risk

A study combining air quality data and suicide reports from across China confirms earlier observations that heavy air pollution from traffic, factories, coal-fired power plants, and home heating can increase the risk of suicide. The study, published today, suggests a Chinese battle plan to clear the air, launched a decade ago, helped prevent some 45,970 suicides from 2013 to 2017....


FRIDAY 9. FEBRUARY 2024


3D printer creates brain tissue that acts like the real thing

By squirting cells from a 3D printer, researchers have created tissue that looks—and acts—like a chunk of brain. In recent years, scientists have learned how to load up 3D printers with cells and other scaffolding ingredients to create living tissues, but making realistic brainlike constructs has been a challenge. Now, one team has shown that, by modifying its printing techniques, it...

Europe’s backpedaling on green legislation has scientists concerned

A controversial proposal to halve the use of pesticides by 2030 has become the European Union’s latest green initiative to face the chop, as leaders scramble to deal with farmers’ protests causing havoc across the continent. On Tuesday, European Commission President Ursula von der Leyen announced she was shelving the Sustainable Use Regulation (SUR), part of a vast policy...

Jury rules for climate scientist Michael Mann in long-running defamation case

A jury found today that Michael Mann, a prominent climate scientist, was defamed by the writers of two blog posts 12 years ago that compared his work on global warming to child molestation. In ruling for Mann, the six-person jury in the Superior Court of the District of Columbia awarded Mann just $2 in actual damages due to the defamation, but then levied a $1 million fine...


THURSDAY 8. FEBRUARY 2024


What’s at stake for science in Supreme Court’s ‘abortion pill’ case?

Next month, the U.S. Supreme Court (SCOTUS) will hear oral arguments in a case that could have profound implications for the authority of the Food and Drug Administration (FDA)—and that will certainly affect access to abortion. The case, which involves disputes over the safety of the FDA-approved abortion drug mifepristone, is an appeal of two lower court decisions that agreed with a...

Rat poison threatens Italy’s growing wolf population

Over the past few decades, Italy’s growing population of wolves has begun to edge closer to urban areas, attracted in part by tasty prey such as rats and mice. But a recent study suggests city life carries a potentially deadly risk for the predators: eating rodents tainted with poison. Analyses of more than 180 wolf carcasses found in Central and Northern Italy revealed that nearly...

At night, pollution keeps pollinating insects from smelling the flowers

Under the cover of darkness, countless moths and other insects furiously dart around woodlands and deserts, seeking nectar from night-blooming plants—and pollinating them in the process. But the scents the insects home in on have grown fainter. Nitrate radicals, a common pollutant, break them down before they can travel far, a research team reports today in Science ....

Gusher of gas deep in mine stokes interest in natural hydrogen

Researchers have discovered a massive spring of hydrogen, bubbling out of a deep mine in Albania. Although it may not be economical to exploit, the surprisingly high flow of the gas is likely to raise interest in the emerging field of natural hydrogen, the overlooked idea that Earth itself could be a source of the clean-burning fuel. “These...