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19,499 articles from ScienceNOW

Modern city dwellers have lost about half their gut microbes

Deep in the human gut, myriad “good” bacteria and other microbes help us digest our food, as well as keep us healthy by affecting our immune, metabolic, and nervous systems. Some of these humble microbial assistants have been in our guts since before humans became human—certain gut microbes are found in almost all primates, suggesting they first colonized a common ancestor. But...

Women scientists don’t get authorship they should, new study suggests

Poba/iStock Science is increasingly conducted by teams. But within those teams, credit isn’t always allocated equitably: Women are less likely to be authors than men in their research group at the same career stage , even accounting for the hours each individual worked on the project, according to a study published today in...


TUESDAY 21. JUNE 2022


Long-lasting HIV prevention drug too slow to reach Africa, activists say

KAMPALA, UGANDA— Melb Simiyu, an HIV prevention officer at a support organization for sex workers here, says most of her clients have asked when a drug called CAB-LA will become available. Approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) in December 2021, the HIV prevention drug could drastically reduce infections among marginalized groups like the one she works...

Why the monkeypox outbreak is mostly affecting men who have sex with men

Ever since monkeypox started sickening thousands of people worldwide this spring, two big questions have loomed: Why is a virus that has never managed to spread beyond a few cases outside Africa suddenly causing such a big, global outbreak? And why are the overwhelming majority of those affected men who have sex with men (MSM)? A long history of work on sexually...


MONDAY 20. JUNE 2022


Why the monkeypox outbreak is mostly affecting men who have sex with men

Ever since monkeypox started to sicken thousands of people worldwide this spring, two big questions have loomed: Why is a virus that has never managed to spread beyond a few cases outside Africa suddenly causing such a big, global outbreak? And why are the overwhelming majority of those affected men who have sex with men (MSM)? A long history of work on sexually transmitted...

In Cambodia, researchers document the world's largest freshwater fish

Thanks to local fishers, a team of scientists on an expedition in Cambodia to tag Mekong River fish has discovered the largest freshwater fish ever documented--a 300-kilogram giant stingray that stretches nearly 4 meters from nose to tail. "It's almost inconceivable that a fish this large still occurs in a river as heavily fished and developed as the Mekong," says Zeb Hogan, a...


FRIDAY 17. JUNE 2022


Electrocuted birds are sparking wildfires

In 2014, a wildfire ripped through central Chile, destroying 2500 homes and killing at least 13 people . A year later, a blaze in Idaho burned more than 4000 hectares, an area nearly 12 times the size of New York City’s Central Park. Both conflagrations had one thing in common: Experts believe they were started by birds. Our feathered friends love to perch on...

Softening tough tissue in aging ovaries may help fight infertility

Would-be parents hoping to get pregnant face a ticking clock: The older potential mothers get, the more their fertility drops. A new study in mice may help explain why. Ovaries accumulate “stiff” tissue as they age, and researchers have found that reducing the amount of this tissue—“softening” the ovaries, as it were—restored fertility in the animals, raising the possibility...

NIH launches grant program aimed at closing the funding rate gap between Black and white investigators

After having one idea batted down last year, some National Institutes of Health (NIH) institutes are taking a new tack to bolster the success rate of Black scientists and researchers from other underrepresented groups seeking research grants. A program aiming to diversify the NIH workforce could award up to $20 million a year to neuroscience, drug abuse, and mental health investigators...


THURSDAY 16. JUNE 2022


Disgraced Italian surgeon convicted of criminal harm to stem cell patient

A surgeon who just a decade ago was celebrated around the globe as a pioneer in stem cell transplants has been convicted of one count of “causing bodily harm,” a felony, in a Swedish court. The district court in Solna today found Paolo Macchiarini not guilty on other charges, including aggravated assault, that could have carried prison sentences of up to 4 years, relating to three...

Arkansas scientist gets 1-year sentence in case stemming from China Initiative

U.S. District Court Judge Timothy Brooks today sentenced Simon Ang to 1 year and 1 day in prison for lying to FBI about his status as an inventor. He was also fined $5500. Ang, a former engineering professor at the University of Arkansas, Fayetteville, was ordered to report to federal prison on 20 July to begin serving his sentence, after which he will be on supervised release for 1...

Murders of women worldwide remain vastly undercounted. Activists are now filling in the gaps

An unknown number of women and girls are killed every year primarily because of their gender, murders known as “femicides” or “feminicides.” Although gender-related violence is a serious problem worldwide, official government data on the issue are often inaccurate, incomplete, or nonexistent. These “missing data” have real consequences, says Helena Suárez Val, a researcher at...

Newly identified population of polar bears survives on glacier slush, not sea ice

Polar bears typically depend on solid sea ice to hunt and keep their bellies full. To breathe, seals pop up in holes in the frozen seawater, and there the bears ambush and eat them. Now, however, scientists have discovered a group of polar bears in southeastern Greenland that does things differently, using a slushy mix of freshwater snow and ice as a platform to ambush seals. This new...


WEDNESDAY 15. JUNE 2022


Some countries still struggle to win EU funding despite programs to give them a leg up

The European Union has had some success leveling the playing field for countries that struggle to attract research funding, but certain countries still lag behind, according to an EU auditing body’s assessment. The “widening measures” aimed at giving stragglers a leg up can only go so far without matching efforts from those countries, says the report from the European Court of...

A $100 genome? New DNA sequencers could be a ‘game changer’ for biology, medicine

For DNA sequencing, this “is the year of the big shake-up,” says Michael Snyder, a systems biologist at Stanford University. Sequencing is crucial to fields from basic biology to virology to human evolution, and its importance keeps growing. Clinicians are clamoring to harness it for early detection of cancer and other diseases, and biologists are finding ever more ways...

800-year-old graves pinpoint where the Black Death began

The Syriac engraving on the medieval tombstone was tantalizing: “This is the tomb of the believer Sanmaq. [He] died of pestilence.” Sanmaq, who was buried in 1338 near Lake Issyk Kul in what is now northern Kyrgyzstan, was one of many victims of the unnamed plague. By scrutinizing field notes and more photos from the Russian team that had excavated the graves in the 1880s, historian...

Beleaguered beagle facility closes under government pressure. Fate of 3000 dogs unclear

Facing growing financial and legal hurdles, a company that owns a troubled research beagle breeding facility in Cumberland, Virginia, said last night it will shutter the establishment, which until recently supplied dogs to universities, major drugmakers, and the National Institutes of Health. Because of the growing cost of bringing the complex of several large buildings into...


MONDAY 13. JUNE 2022


Arati Prabhakar set to become Biden’s science adviser and his pick to lead science office

Some content has been removed for formatting reasons. Please view the original article for the best reading experience. In 1993, then-President Bill Clinton picked a 34-year-old applied physicist named Arati Prabhakar to lead the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST). Two decades later, former President Barack Obama chose her to lead the Defense Advanced Research Projects...

Artificial intelligence may have unearthed one of the world’s oldest campfires

Some content has been removed for formatting reasons. Please view the original article for the best reading experience. It’s not always easy to find clues to ancient campfires. Bits of charcoal, cracked bones, and discolored rocks often give a prehistoric blaze away. But not every blaze leaves such obvious traces, especially after hundreds of thousands of years. Now, using...

Mice of the sea: Watch elephant seals use whiskers to find food

Some content has been removed for formatting reasons. Please view the original article for the best reading experience. Female elephant seals spend most of their lives fishing in complete darkness. Now, by strapping infrared cameras to their heads, scientists have figured out how these sleek swimmers locate their prey: They move their whiskers like satellite...

Ten years after the Higgs, physicists face the nightmare of finding nothing else

Some content has been removed for formatting reasons. Please view the original article for the best reading experience. A decade ago, particle physicists thrilled the world. On 4 July 2012, 6000 researchers working with the world’s biggest atom smasher, the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at the European particle physics laboratory, CERN, announced they had discovered the Higgs boson, a...