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19,487 articles from ScienceNOW

As monkeypox threat grows, scientists debate best vaccine strategy

Some content has been removed for formatting reasons. Please view the original article for the best reading experience. In 1959, German microbiologist Anton Mayr took a strain of vaccinia, a poxvirus used to inoculate against smallpox, and started to grow it in cells taken from chicken embryos. After several years of transferring the strain to fresh cells every few days, the virus had...


TUESDAY 7. JUNE 2022


Chile’s Indigenous peoples seek fairer partnerships with scientists

Some content has been removed for formatting reasons. Please view the original article for the best reading experience. The small fishing settlement of Puerto Edén is nestled on Wellington Island in southern Chile, among a labyrinth of islets and fjords at least a day’s journey from the nearest city. But the distance and Patagonian cold have not discouraged generations of scientists...


MONDAY 6. JUNE 2022


How the wild jungle fowl became the chicken

Some content has been removed for formatting reasons. Please view the original article for the best reading experience. From chicken biryani to khao mun gai, chicken and rice is a winning combo worldwide. But the two are more inextricably linked than even chefs realized. A pair of new archaeological studies suggest that without rice, chickens may have never existed. The work...

‘Helicopter research’ comes under fire at Cape Town conference

Some content has been removed for formatting reasons. Please view the original article for the best reading experience. When researchers from wealthy countries engage in “helicopter research”—thoughtless field research in poorer countries that extracts data without respectful collaboration—they violate research integrity and pose a moral problem, say attendees at last week’s...


FRIDAY 3. JUNE 2022


Did volcanic ‘glasses’ help spark early life?

Some content has been removed for formatting reasons. Please view the original article for the best reading experience. When life emerged, it did so quickly. Fossils suggest microbes were present 3.7 billion years ago, just a few hundred million years after the 4.5-billion-year-old planet had cooled enough to support biochemistry, and many researchers think the hereditary material for...

New director of NASA’s storied Jet Propulsion Lab takes on ballooning mission costs

Some content has been removed for formatting reasons. Please view the original article for the best reading experience. On 16 May, planetary scientist Laurie Leshin became director of NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL), one of the world’s leading labs for robotic space science. Coming off the successful landing of the Perseverance rover on Mars, JPL is readying several more...

Researchers criticize Senate plan to steer more NSF funding to ‘have not’ states

Some content has been removed for formatting reasons. Please view the original article for the best reading experience. Top research universities in just a handful of U.S. states conduct the majority of research funded by the National Science Foundation (NSF), while institutions in half the country receive only crumbs. The U.S. Senate wants NSF to correct that longstanding...


THURSDAY 2. JUNE 2022


This ancient giraffe relative head-butted rivals with an ‘amazing sexual weapon’

Some content has been removed for formatting reasons. Please view the original article for the best reading experience. How did the giraffe get its long neck? That question has enthralled scientists for centuries. Charles Darwin assumed the driver of natural selection was food, as animals with longer necks could reach higher trees and have their own private food supply with little...

Controversial Canadian supplements researcher not guilty of misconduct, report says

Some content has been removed for formatting reasons. Please view the original article for the best reading experience. Botanist Steven Newmaster, whose controversial work profoundly influenced how dietary supplements are tested and marketed, did not engage in scientific misconduct, a University of Guelph (UG) investigation committee has ruled. Newmaster “displayed a pattern of...


WEDNESDAY 1. JUNE 2022


Better than CRISPR? Another way to fix gene problems may be safer and more versatile

Some content has been removed for formatting reasons. Please view the original article for the best reading experience. Tools such as CRISPR that snip DNA to alter its sequence are moving tantalizingly close to the clinic as treatment for some genetic diseases. But away from the limelight, researchers are increasingly excited about an alternative that leaves a DNA sequence unchanged....

Monkeypox is a new global threat. African scientists know what the world is up against

Some content has been removed for formatting reasons. Please view the original article for the best reading experience. As monkeypox stokes here-we-go-again fears in a pandemic-weary world, some researchers in Africa are having their own sense of déjà vu. Another neglected tropical disease of the poor gets attention only after it starts to infect people in wealthy countries. “It’s as...

‘Singing’ lava lakes could help predict when volcanoes will blow

Some content has been removed for formatting reasons. Please view the original article for the best reading experience. In 2007, lava began to pool inside one of the craters atop Hawaii’s Kilauea volcano, a gentle eruption that would culminate more than a decade later in a spectacular display of spewed ash and massive lava flows . Until that final outburst, the lava lake...

Upheaval in Norwegian science funding threatens grants

Some content has been removed for formatting reasons. Please view the original article for the best reading experience. Norwegian researchers are facing dramatic budget cuts after the government abruptly took control of its research funding agency board and said it must curtail its spending. On 12 May, the Norwegian Ministry of Education and Research announced it had fired the entire board...

Wild parrot chicks babble like human infants

Some content has been removed for formatting reasons. Please view the original article for the best reading experience. Babies don’t babble to sound cute—they’re taking their first steps on the path to learning language. Now, a study shows parrot chicks do the same. Although the behavior has been seen in songbirds and two mammalian species, finding it in these birds is important,...

World’s largest organism found in Australia

Some content has been removed for formatting reasons. Please view the original article for the best reading experience. It sounds like the stuff of science fiction: Two closely related species hybridize and create a superorganism whose growth and expansion seems unstoppable. That’s what’s happened in Western Australia’s Shark Bay, researchers say, where a seagrass meadow (see above)...


TUESDAY 31. MAY 2022


Is technology spying on you? New AI could prevent eavesdropping

Some content has been removed for formatting reasons. Please view the original article for the best reading experience. Big Brother is listening. Companies use “bossware” to listen to their employees when they’re near their computers. Multiple “spyware” apps can record phone calls. And home devices such as Amazon’s Echo can record everyday conversations. A new technology,...


SATURDAY 28. MAY 2022



FRIDAY 27. MAY 2022



THURSDAY 26. MAY 2022