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225,310 articles from PhysOrg

Upgrades to NASA's space communications infrastructure pave the way to higher data rates

The ability to transmit and receive data is crucial in space exploration. Spacecraft need robust networking capabilities to send data—including large files like photos and videos—captured by onboard instruments to Earth as well as simultaneously receiving commands from control centers. NASA has made significant strides to improve the agency's space communications capabilities while...

Magnetic 'balding' of black holes saves general relativity prediction

Black holes aren't what they eat. Einstein's general relativity predicts that no matter what a black hole consumes, its external properties depend only on its mass, rotation and electric charge. All other details about its diet disappear. Astrophysicists whimsically call this the no-hair conjecture. (Black holes, they say, "have no hair.")

Why big fish thrive in protected oceans

Big fish are harder to find in areas sprawling with human activity, unless you're looking in no-take marine reserves, according to a new study led by marine scientists at The University of Western Australia.

The pulse of the Dead Sea

The Dead Sea is shrinking. There are many reasons for this: climate change is a contributing factor, as is human overuse of water as a resource. The sinking water level has a number of dangerous consequences. For example, fresh groundwater flowing downstream causes salts to dissolve in the soil, resulting in sinkholes. But it also leads to large-scale subsidence of the surrounding land surface....

For animal societies, cohesion comes at a cost

From gaining valuable information to staying safe from predators, moving in a group can benefit animals—but at what cost? Researchers from the Max Planck Institute of Animal Behavior have provided rare insight into the physical price that animals pay for moving collectively. Using accelerometers—the equivalent of pedometers, or Fitbits—the team of scientists studied the detailed movement...

First test of Europe's new space brain

ESA has successfully operated a spacecraft with Europe's next-generation mission control system for the first time. The powerful software, named the "European Ground System—Common Core' (EGS-CC), will be the 'brain' of all European spaceflight operations in the years to come, and promises new possibilities for how future missions will fly.

What you need to know about the invasive spotted lanternfly spreading across the eastern U.S.

The spotted lanternfly was first detected in Pennsylvania in 2014 and has since spread to 26 counties in that state and at least six other eastern states. It's moving into southern New England, Ohio and Indiana. This approximately 1-inch-long species from Asia has attractive polka-dotted front wings but can infest and kill trees and plants. We recently caught up with Professor Frank Hale, an...

Dams fuel malaria cases in Africa

While dams are critical to ensuring water and food security throughout Sub-Saharan Africa, small dams in particular pose a greater risk of malaria transmission, a study says.

Low upward mobility linked to early mortality

Upward mobility—the capacity to improve one's socioeconomic status—is key to realizing the American dream of a long, prosperous, and happy life, Yale researchers say. In a new study, they found a strong relationship between the lack of upward mobility early in life and increased mortality rates in young adults, particularly among Black males.

Pine sap–based plastic: A potential gamechanger for future of sustainable materials

Over the past 100 years, plastics and polymers have changed the way the world operates, from airplanes and automobiles to computers and cell phones—nearly all of which are composed of fossil fuel-based compounds. A Florida State University research team's discovery of a new plastic derived from pine sap has the potential to be a gamechanger for new sustainable materials.