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203,184 articles from PhysOrg

Astronomers recategorize asteroid-like comet

Recently discovered object 2019 LD2, originally believed to be the first cometary "Jupiter Trojan" asteroid by astronomers at the University of Hawaiʻi at Mānoa Institute for Astronomy turns out to be an interloper comet masquerading as a member of the Trojan population. The distinction was first suggested by amateur astronomers Sam Deen and Tony Dunn on the Minor Planet Mailing List on May 21...

Simulations explain detonation properties in TATB

Two Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) scientists have discovered a new mechanism for ignition of high explosives that explains the unusual detonation properties of 1,3,5-triamino-2,4,6-trinitrobenzene (TATB).

Herding wild buffalo and cattle from space

More than 1000 feral buffalo and unmanaged cattle roaming Northern Australia will be tagged and tracked as part of the world's largest satellite herd-tracking program, announced today by Australia's national science agency, CSIRO.

Taming CRISPR's collateral damage

CRISPR-Cas9 can alter genes at pre-defined sites in specific ways, but it does not always act as planned. An LMU team has now developed a simple method to detect unintended "on-target" events, and shown that they often occur in human stem cells.

Heat now more lethal than cold for people with respiratory diseases in Spain

A new study by the Barcelona Institute for Global Health (ISGlobal), a center supported by the la Caixa Foundation, has analyzed deaths linked to respiratory disease in Spain between 1980 and 2016. The study, which analyzed data on more than 1.3 million deaths, found that the seasonality of temperature-attributable mortality from respiratory diseases has shifted from the coldest to the hottest...

Winds spread PFAS pollution far from a manufacturing facility

Concerns about environmental and health risks of some fluorinated carbon compounds used to make non-stick coatings and fire-fighting foams have prompted manufacturers to develop substitutes, but these replacements are increasingly coming under fire themselves. To get a handle on the scope of the problem, scientists have been studying how widely these chemicals have contaminated the environment....

Researchers use geometry and dynamics to better understand tissue organization

Embryogenesis—how an organism arises from a single cell—is one of the most mysterious and complex processes in nature. The large-scale, coordinated and collective movements of cells in a tissue during embryogenesis resemble the complex and chaotic flows of fluids in the ocean or atmosphere. But how do these movements determine which cells are destined to become part of the brain, the gut or...

Royal jelly does not a queen make

What makes a queen? For bees, it's long been believed that queenliness depends on a special diet of royal jelly—a milky white secretion of protein, water and fat that oozes from the heads of nurse bees.


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Flow-through electrodes make hydrogen 50 times faster

Electrolysis, passing a current through water to break it into gaseous hydrogen and oxygen, could be a handy way to store excess energy from wind or solar power. The hydrogen can be stored and used as fuel later, when the sun is down or the winds are calm.

Urge to merge: Understanding how cells fuse

Scientists have known for a decade that cells that fuse with others to perform their essential functions—such as muscle cells that join together to make fibers—form long projections that invade the territory of their fusion partners. But how the thin and floppy polymers involved in this process propel mechanically stiff protrusions has been unknown.

Warming climate is changing where birds breed: study

Spring is in full swing. Trees are leafing out, flowers are blooming, bees are buzzing, and birds are singing. But a recent study published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences found that those birds in your backyard may be changing right along with the climate.