feed info

210,422 articles from PhysOrg

Ancient wall found in Iran

Archaeologists in northern Iran have uncovered the remains of a 124-mile-long wall, the second longest such structure in Asia after the Great Wall of China.

Agency Announces Recovery Plan for Bird

(AP) -- Federal wildlife officials released a long-range plan Monday for removing a tiny bird that nests on West Coast beaches from Endangered Species Act protections by 2047 with the help of volunteers from the Audubon Society, the Boy Scouts and other nonprofit groups.

Experiment to Get Cargo From Space Fails

(AP) -- Forget e-mail. How about space mail? In an experiment combining elements of a package delivery service, the sport of kite surfing and a REALLY big fishing reel, Russian and European engineers on Tuesday sought to pioneer a technology that could be used in the future to retrieve cargo from space.

AT&T Suspends Cell Phone Control

(AP) -- AT&T Inc. has suspended a service allowing parents to put limits on when their children's cell phones can be used because it could restrict return calls from 911 operators.


TUESDAY 25. SEPTEMBER 2007


'Hot' ice could lead to medical device

Harvard physicists have shown that specially treated diamond coatings can keep water frozen at body temperature, a finding that may have applications in future medical implants.

Boys have biological reason to be troublesome

A team of researchers working with UQ's Queensland Brain Institute (QBI) has discovered more compelling evidence that attention-deficit disorder in young boys is substantially attributable to brain development.

Cluster of video games maps brain

Four college students have devised a way to use a cluster of Sony PLAYSTATION3 video game consoles, for large-scale modeling of the human brain. Their design won them first place - and $10,000 - in IBM`s Cell Broadband Engine (Cell/B.E.) Processor University Challenge.

Genes Key to Future Cancer Treatment

(AP) -- The treatment that more cancer patients receive may one day depend on their genes. With an increasing number of biological clues available, doctors hope they will be able to customize more patients' treatments based on their genetic profiles.

MIT tether could aid asteroid missions

Using a tether system devised by MIT researchers, astronauts could one day stroll across the surface of small asteroids, collecting samples and otherwise exploring these rocks in space without floating away.

NASA finds Greenland snow melting hit record high in high places

A new NASA-supported study reports that 2007 marked an overall rise in the melting trend over the entire Greenland ice sheet and, remarkably, melting in high-altitude areas was greater than ever at 150 percent more than average. In fact, the amount of snow that has melted this year over Greenland could cover the surface size of the U.S. more than twice.

NASA Spacecraft Is a 'Go' for Asteroid Beltbrics

Launch and flight teams are in final preparations for the planned Sept. 27 liftoff from Pad 17-B at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Fla., of NASA's Dawn mission. The Dawn spacecraft will venture into the heart of the asteroid belt, where it will document in exceptional detail the mammoth rocky asteroid Vesta, and then, the even bigger icy dwarf planet Ceres.

Simulation reveals how body repairs balance after damage

Your body goes to a lot of trouble to make sure you stay upright. But when the brain`s neural pathways are impaired through injury, age or illness, muscles are deprived of the detailed sensory information they need to perform the constant yet delicate balancing act required for normal movement and standing.

Study shows autism symptoms can improve into adulthood

Hallmarks of autism are characteristic behaviors - repetitive motions, problems interacting with others, impaired communication abilities - that occur in widely different combinations and degrees of severity among those who have the condition.

'Halo 3' Packaging Scratches Disks

(AP) -- Less than 24 hours after die-hard fans finally got their hands on a copy of "Halo 3," blogs brimmed with reports that special limited-edition packaging is scratching the video game disks.

'Kissing cousins'

Understanding whether inbreeding accounts for early mortality is a long-standing concern in demographic research. Analyzing Bedouin villages in Bekaa, Lebanon, in which the marriage rate among first cousins is more than twice the national average, a new study appearing in the October issue of Current Anthropology finds that the greatest single determinant of infant mortality is not closely related...

IMAX Camera Returns to Space to Chronicle Hubble Space Telescope

IMAX Corporation and Warner Bros. Pictures announced Monday that, in cooperation with NASA, the IMAX 3D camera is scheduled to return to space in 2008 aboard the space shuttle during STS-125 for production of a new film. Set for release in early 2010, IMAX will chronicle the life story of the Hubble Space Telescope.

It's all in the spin: Quantum physics cools down computers

The future of Moore's famous law—that the number of transistors squeezed onto a computer chip can be doubled about every two years—is widely seen as threatened by the damaging heat generated by the chips themselves as their transistors become more densely packed.

Nokia answers convergence call with Nokia 6301 UMA phone

With a sleek stainless steel design, the Nokia 6301 phone launched today is not only stylish, but offers consumers seamless voice and data mobility across GSM cellular and WLAN networks via Unlicensed Mobile Access (UMA) technology. The Nokia 6301 phone uses UMA technology to integrate the benefits of landline and a mobile phone, including seamless indoor coverage, sound quality and affordability.