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214,463 articles from PhysOrg

New cell death pathway involved in sperm development

Heavy and bulky sperm would not be good swimmers. To trim down, sperm rely on cell death proteins called caspases, which facilitate the removal of unwanted cellular material and radically remodel these cells into their sleek, light shape. New research from scientists at the Howard Hughes Medical Institute and Rockefeller University has now uncovered a new pathway that regulates these killer...

Online Anti-Piracy Firm's E-Mails Leaked

(AP) -- Hackers who intercepted e-mail from MediaDefender Inc., a firm that tries to stymie unauthorized downloading of songs and movies on behalf of record companies and Hollywood film studios, have released hundreds of megabytes of data on the Internet.

Yahoo to Buy Zimbra for $350M

(AP) -- Yahoo Inc. is buying e-mail service Zimbra Inc. for $350 million in an all-cash deal that may open a new revenue channel for the slumping Internet icon.

Mercury concentrations in fish respond quickly to increased deposition

A joint Canadian-American research team have, for the first time, demonstrated that mercury concentrations in fish respond directly to changes in atmospheric deposition of the chemical. The international team`s research began in 2001 at the Experimental Lakes in Northern Ontario and is featured in this week`s Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

Scientists unlock secrets of protein folding

A team led by biophysicist Jeremy Smith of the University of Tennessee and Oak Ridge National Laboratory has taken a significant step toward unraveling the mystery of how proteins fold into unique, three-dimensional shapes.

Researchers shed new light on hybrid animals

What began more than 50 years ago as a way to improve fishing bait in California has led a University of Tennessee researcher to a significant finding about how animal species interact and that raises important questions about conservation.

Scientists identify fundamental brain defect, probable drug target in fragile X syndrome

Scientists have discovered how the gene mutation responsible for fragile X syndrome--the most common inherited form of mental retardation--alters the way brain cells communicate. In neurons cultured from laboratory rats, the scientists also were able to reverse the effects of the mutation using a drug targeted to the specific site in an upstream pathway of the defect. The finding could lead to...

Adobe's 3Q Profit Beats Predictions

(AP) -- Adobe Systems Inc. reported Monday that its third-quarter profit more than doubled from last year, setting a revenue record and easily exceeding Wall Street's expectations as the software company comes off its biggest-ever product launch.


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Gene determines whether male body odor smells pleasant

To many, urine smells like urine and vanilla smells like vanilla. But androstenone, a derivative of testosterone that is a potent ingredient in male body odor, can smell like either - depending on your genes. While many people perceive a foul odor from androstenone, usually that of stale urine or strong sweat, others find the scent sweet and pleasant. Still others cannot smell it at all.

Good earth: Chemists show origin of soil-scented geosmin

Brown University chemists have found the origins of an odor - the sweet smell of fresh dirt. In Nature Chemical Biology, the Brown team shows that the protein that makes geosmin - source of the good earth scent - has two similar but distinct halves, each playing a critical role in making this organic compound.

In Health Care Debate, U-Word Is Back

(AP) -- It's been 14 years since first lady Hillary Rodham Clinton's health care reform plan sank like a stone, swallowed by fears of a big-government power grab. In the years since, wary presidential candidates at first avoided the issue altogether, then gingerly dipped one toe, then another, back into the pool.

Arctic Ice Melt Opens Northwest Passage

(AP) -- Arctic ice has shrunk to the lowest level on record, new satellite images show, raising the possibility that the Northwest Passage that eluded famous explorers will become an open shipping lane.

Ancient Records Help Test Climate Change

(AP) -- A librarian at this 10th century monastery leads a visitor beneath the vaulted ceilings of the archive past the skulls of two former abbots. He pushes aside medieval ledgers of indulgences and absolutions, pulls out one of 13 bound diaries inscribed from 1671 to 1704 and starts to read about the weather.