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247,914 articles from PhysOrg

Computer program traces ancestry using anonymous DNA samples

A group of computer scientists, mathematicians, and biologists from around the world have developed a computer algorithm that can help trace the genetic ancestry of thousands of individuals in minutes, without any prior knowledge of their background. The team`s findings will be published in the September 2007 edition of the journal PLoS Genetics.

Palm Struggles to Shine Again

(AP) -- Palm Inc.'s death knell has been rung over and over - on Wall Street, in headlines, and by a growing number of discontented fans.

Scientists discover technique to help 'friendly bacteria'

There is currently a great deal of interest in the health-associated properties of probiotics, also known as ‘beneficial` or ‘friendly` bacteria, and prebiotics, the food needed for the growth of probiotic when inside our bodies. University of Leicester scientists have discovered a natural fruit-based extract that dramatically improves the growth and probiotic qualities of ‘friendly` bacteria...

Suit Seeks 'A La Carte' Channel Choices

(AP) -- The U.S. pay-TV industry amounts to a cartel because it maintains profits by offering channels in prepackaged tiers rather than "a la carte," according to a lawsuit filed Thursday in Los Angeles.

Utah Officials Alarmed Over Bullfrogs

(AP) -- Utah wildlife officials are alarmed over the presence of American bullfrogs. Acting on a tip from a golfer, biologists confirmed the frogs were in a pond at Roosevelt Golf Course. They have moved elsewhere in the Uinta Basin in eastern Utah, 150 miles east of Salt Lake City.

Oracle 1Q Profit Up 25 Percent

(AP) -- Business software maker Oracle Corp. overcame the recent economic turbulence that raised recession anxieties to deliver a fiscal first-quarter performance that topped analyst expectations.

Scientists launch deep-sea scientific drilling program to study volatile earthquake zone

Today, the Nankai Trough Seismogenic Zone Experiment (NanTroSEIZE) gets underway, with the Japanese drilling vessel Chikyu departing from Shingu Port with scientists aboard, all ready to log, drill, sample, and install monitoring instrumentation in one of the most active earthquake zones on Earth. The vessel's launch starts the first of a series of scientific drilling expeditions that will...

Mystery Boy in Iron Coffin Identified

(AP) -- Researchers have solved the mystery of the boy in the iron coffin. The cast-iron coffin was discovered by utility workers in Washington two years ago. Smithsonian scientists led by forensic anthropologist Doug Owsley set about trying to determine who was buried in it, so the body could be placed in a new, properly marked grave.

SEC Subpoenas Jobs in Stock Options Case

(AP) -- Apple Inc. CEO Steve Jobs has been subpoenaed by the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission to give a deposition in a stock-options backdating case against Apple's former general counsel, a person familiar with the case told The Associated Press Thursday.


THURSDAY 20. SEPTEMBER 2007


Nasal surgery helps transsexuals

British scientists say transsexuals undergoing male-to-female gender reassignment report satisfaction with surgery to create a more feminine-appearing nose.

Smart insulin nanostructures pass feasibility test

Biomedical engineers at The University of Texas School of Health Information Sciences at Houston have announced pre-clinical test results in the September issue of the International Journal of Nanomedicine demonstrating the feasibility of a smart particle insulin release system that detects spikes in glucose or blood sugar levels and releases insulin to counteract them.

Toshiba to demonstrate prototype of new 'SpursEngine' processor

Toshiba Corporation today announced development of the "SpursEngine", a high-performance stream processor integrating Synergistic Processing Element (SPE) cores derived from the Cell Broadband Engine (Cell/B.E.). The SpursEngine is expressly designed to bring the powerful capabilities of the Cell/B.E. technology to consumer electronics, and to take video processing in digital consumer products to...

Bend it like... a Millipede?

While industry spends billions bending and shaping sheets of metal, a team in this year's UQ Business School Enterprize competition claims that it can do it better - and cheaper.

Collapsing structures to be tested in revamped UW engineering lab

Just as Minneapolis now finds itself in the middle of a national debate on bridge safety, so the Puget Sound area was some 70 years ago. The infamous collapse of the Tacoma Narrows Bridge in 1940 prompted a national discussion on bridge engineering. It also provided the impetus for founding University of Washington's Structural Research Laboratory, which opened its doors in 1948 in the school's...

Experiments challenge models about the deep Earth

In the first experiments able to mimic the crushing, searing conditions found in Earth`s lower mantle, and simultaneously probe tell-tale properties of iron, scientists have discovered that material there behaves very differently than predicted by models. The research also points to the likelihood of a new zone deep in the Earth. The work is published in the September 21, 2007, issue of Science.

i.play Offers Video Game-like Playground Equipment

For children of today`s generation, swings and slides don`t seem to cut it anymore—not when you have an Xbox and Playstation in your living room. In an attempt to curb the rising childhood obesity rates partially associated with indoor electronics, researchers in the UK have designed an outdoor playground unit based on the concepts of video games.

Low-Alpha Mode Increases Possibilities at SSRL

Since the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory (SSRL) began experiments in 1973, it has proven to be a bottomless well of scientific discovery. Now, a team of SLAC accelerator physicists is working to add new functionality to the SPEAR synchrotron accelerator. The team—James Safranek, Xiaobiao Huang and Andrei Terebilo—has tested a new "low-alpha mode" for SPEAR that results in shorter...

Review: Archos 605 WiFi Doesn't Impress

(AP) -- Sporting a brushed metal case, a crisp, wide touch screen and wireless Internet capabilities, the latest portable media gadget from Archos sounds like a match for the newest iPods.