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185,324 articles from EurekAlert

'Love thy neighbor, mask up' resonates among white evangelicals

White evangelicals are best persuaded to mask up through messages that stress the Christian doctrine of "love thy neighbor," according to a UCR-authored study published Tuesday. The study yielded a second effective way to persuade white evangelicals - but only if they are Republican. That is, messaging from former President Donald Trump that aligns mask-wearing with patriotism. The lessons...

Congestion pricing could shrink car size

Rush hour will likely return when pandemic lockdowns lift, but a new study suggests that congestion pricing--policies that charge tolls for driving during peak hours--could not only cure traffic jams but also convince motorists it is safe to buy smaller, more efficient cars.

Count your blessings: Short gratitude intervention can increase academic motivation

Our dynamically changing lifestyle can make it hard for many to stay motivated on work and study, which calls for new intervention strategies. In a recent study published in BMC Psychology, researchers explore how nurturing feelings of gratitude can enhance motivation among college students. Their results show that a keeping a daily gratitude journal for only two weeks has a positive impact on...

Health effects of prenatal exposure to 1994 genocide against the Tutsi in Rwanda

Twenty-seven years ago, more than 1 million Rwandans were killed during the genocide against the Tutsi in Rwanda (April 7-July 4, 1994). It is estimated that 100,000 to 250,000 women were raped during the genocide, and that 10,000 children were born as a result. A new study finds that Rwandans who were conceived by mothers who survived this genocide have poorer adult health outcomes than those who...

Kaiser Permanente cancer survival rate higher among insured

Among cancer patients with health coverage in Southern California, those who were diagnosed and treated at Kaiser Permanente, an integrated health care organization, had better survival rates, especially Black and Latino patients, according to Kaiser Permanente research published in The American Journal of Managed Care.

Largest-ever study of artificial insemination in sharks--and the occasional 'virgin birth'

Scientists help protect sharks by developing aquarium breeding programs that pair up individuals in ways that increase genetic diversity. In a new study in Scientific Reports, scientists undertook the largest-ever effort to artificially inseminate sharks.Their work resulted in 97 new baby sharks, including ones whose parents live on opposite sides of the country and a few that don't have fathers...

Life may have become cellular by using unusual molecules

All modern life is cellular, but how life came to be cellular remains uncertain. New research shows that simple chemical compounds known as hydroxy acids, which were likely common on primitive Earth, spontaneously link together and form structures reminiscent of cells when dried from solution, as may have happened on primitive beaches. The resulting structures may have helped scaffold the...

Obesity during adolescence linked to increased risk of stroke as an adult

Higher body mass index (BMI) - an indicator of obesity - in late adolescence is associated with a significantly higher risk of first ischemic stroke in men and women under age 50, regardless of whether they had Type 2 diabetes.Even BMIs in the high-normal range are associated with increased stroke risk in both men and women.

Orangutan finding highlights need to protect habitat

Wild orangutans are known for their ability to survive food shortages, but scientists have made a surprising finding that highlights the need to protect the habitat of these critically endangered primates, which face rapid habitat destruction and threats linked to climate change.

Scientists find molecular patterns that may help identify extraterrestrial life

Scientists have begun the search for extraterrestrial life in the Solar System in earnest, but such life may be subtly or profoundly different from Earth-life, and methods based on detecting particular molecules as biosignatures may not work with life with a different evolutionary history. A new study by a joint Japan/US-based team has developed a machine learning technique that assesses complex...

Teaching a computer program to track cells

Scientists at Gladstone Institutes have developed such an approach using "neural nets"--artificial intelligence programs that can detect patterns--to analyze the locations of hundreds of cells growing together in a colony. When they applied the technique to a group of stem cells, the program revealed that a small number of cells act as "leaders," able to direct the movements of their neighbors.


WEDNESDAY 12. MAY 2021


10 years after obesity surgery: How did life turn out?

In a new study from Lund University and the University of Gothenburg, patients were interviewed about their experiences ten years after undergoing obesity surgery. The results show that the effect on eating and weight regulation persisted, whereas other problems, such as feelings of guilt about still not being healthy enough, remained.

20 days later -- The short story about muscles regeneration

Skeletal muscles make a tremendous variety of actions stabilizing the body in different positions. Despite their endurance during daily activities, they can undergo several mild injuries caused by sport, accidental overstretching, or sudden overtwisting. Luckily mild injuries can be quickly healed; however, when a large part of muscles is damaged or resected surgically, the full recovery can be...

A delicate balance: Learning new ways that gut microbes educate the immune system

An immune system that mistakes our good gut bacteria for an enemy can cause a dangerous type of inflammation in the intestines called colitis. An immune system that looks the other way while gut microbes spill past their assigned borders is equally dangerous. Understanding how the immune system learns to make a brokered peace with its microbial residents, called the microbiota, is therefore an...

A hairpin to fight cancer

The inhibition of pathological protein-protein interactions is a promising approach for treating a large number of diseases, including many forms of cancer. A team of researchers has now developed a bicyclic peptide that binds to beta-catenin--a protein associated with certain types of tumor. The secret of their success is the cyclic nature and the hairpin shape of the peptide, which mimics a...

A long-lasting, stable solid-state lithium battery

Harvard researchers have designed a stable, lithium-metal solid state battery that can be charged and discharged at least 10,000 times -- far more cycles than have been previously demonstrated --- at a high current density. The battery technology could increase the lifetime of electric vehicles to that of the gasoline cars -- 10 to 15 years -- without the need to replace the battery. With its high...

A new bridge between the geometry of fractals and the dynamics of partial synchronization

In mathematics, simple equations can generate a complex evolution in time and intriguing patterns in space. One famous example of this is the Mandelbrot set, named after the French-American mathematician of Polish origin, Benoit B. Mandelbrot (1924-2010), the most studied fractal. This set is based on a single quadratic equation with only one parameter and one variable. The fascinating fractal...

AI learns to type on a phone like humans

To really understand how people type on touchscreens, researchers at Aalto University and the Finnish Center for Artificial Intelligence (FCAI) have created the first artificial intelligence model that predicts how people move their eyes and fingers while typing. The AI model can simulate how a human user would type any sentence on any keyboard design. It makes errors, detects and corrects them,...