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163,091 articles from EurekAlert

BERT tells ERNI it's time to grow a brain

UCL scientists have discovered how two proteins called BERT and ERNI interact in embryos to control when different organ systems in the body start to form, deepening our understanding of the development of the brain and nervous system and stem cell behaviour.

Carrot cake study on sugar in type 2 diabetes

Patients with type 2 diabetes are often advised to limit sucrose (table sugar) intake. A new study has shown that patients who increased their daily sugar intake (in the form of carrot cake) but maintained a stable body weight, showed no adverse changes in their condition.

Docetaxel given after doxorubicin reduces recurrence

Adding the drug docetaxel to anthracycline-based chemotherapy slightly improved disease-free survival in breast cancer patients, according to a randomized clinical trial published online Jan. 8 in the Journal of the National Cancer Institute.

Eating out can have both positive and negative impact on obesity

Eating out instead of cooking at home continues to increase as a factor impacting the American diet. Americans face a large variety of food options and food establishments when choosing to eat out. Do the choices of available restaurants matter to America's rising obesity? In a study published in the February 2008 issue of the American Journal of Preventive Medicine, researchers found that the...

Experimental weight-loss drug cuts appetite, burns more energy

The first clinical studies of an experimental drug have revealed that obese people who take it for 12 weeks lose weight, even at very low doses. Short-term studies also suggest that the drug, called taranabant -- the second drug designed to fight obesity by blocking cannabinoid receptors in the brain -- causes people to consume fewer calories and burn more energy.

First rigorous analysis defines impact of Medicare Part D

The most thorough study to date of the impact of the Medicare Prescription Drug Benefit (Part D) found a "modest but significant effect." The benefit led to a 13.1 percent decrease in out-of-pocket expenses for patients and a 5.9 percent increase in prescription use.

Freeze-dried tendon implants prove effective in early studies

Donated, freeze-dried tendon grafts loaded with gene therapy may soon offer effective repair of injured tendons, a goal that has eluded surgeons to date. According to study data published today in the journal Molecular Therapy, a new graft technique may provide the first effective framework around which flexor tendon tissue can reorganize as it heals.

Higher Medicare spending yields mixed bag for patients

A large-scale study of over 55,000 colorectal cancer patients found that Medicare beneficiaries in "high spending" areas get better care in some circumstances, but worse care in others. On net, they do no better than their peers in lower spending areas.

Hope Diamond's phosphorescence key to fingerprinting

Shine a white light on the Hope Diamond and it will dazzle you with the brilliance of an amazing blue diamond. Shine an ultraviolet light on the Hope Diamond and the gem will glow red-orange for about five minutes. This phosphorescent property of blue diamonds can distinguish synthetic and altered diamonds from the real thing, and it may also provide a way to fingerprint individual blue diamonds...

Humans have caused profound changes in Caribbean coral reefs

Coral reefs in the Caribbean have suffered significant changes due to the proximal effects of a growing human population, according to a study published the Proceedings of the Royal Society of London."Coral reefs are declining worldwide but the driving forces remain hotly debated," said author Camilo Mora, of Dalhousie University. "In the Caribbean alone, losses are endangering many species, and...

Marketing the South: Commercial mythmaking and reshaping of popular memories

The historical, competitive, and ideological factors that structure the practices of commercial mythmaking remain largely unexplored and undertheorized. Now, a study from the February 2008 issue of the Journal of Consumer Research investigates these interrelationships by performing a comparative analysis of two prominent New South mythmakers -- editors of nationally distributed magazines about the...

NASA and Gemini probe mysterious explosion in the distant past

Using the powerful one-two combo of NASA's Swift satellite and the Gemini Observatory, astronomers have detected a mysterious type of cosmic explosion farther back in time than ever before. The explosion, known as a short gamma-ray burst, took place 7.4 billion years ago, more than halfway back to the Big Bang.

NASA announces details of Hubble servicing mission

NASA scientists and a space shuttle astronaut today outlined details of a challenging mission that will repair and upgrade the Hubble Space Telescope in 2008. The Hubble servicing mission, designated STS-125, will equip the orbiting observatory with far greater capabilities than ever had before to explore the nature and history of our universe.

New insight into factors that drive muscle-building stem cells

A report in the January issue of Cell Metabolism, a publication of Cell Press, provides new evidence explaining how stem cells known as satellite cells contribute to building muscles up in response to exercise. These findings could lead to treatments for reversing or improving the muscle loss that occurs in diseases such as cancer and AIDS as well as in the normal aging process