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4,187 articles from TIME

Inside the World’s Largest Solar Power Plant

At the edge of the Mojave Desert, about 80 miles (130 km) east of Palm Springs, Calif., millions of midnight blue solar panels stretch to the horizon, angled toward the sky like reclining sunbathers. Here, the sun has few enemies. It shines at least 300 days of the year, bathing the more than 8 million photovoltaic (PV) panels at the Desert Sunlight Solar Farm in daylong streams of rays. All that...

Troubled Waters on Planet Earth

Stand on a beach at sunset and you can almost convince yourself that all is well beneath the waves. But three new studies reveal just how sick the oceans are–and how big a role humans are playing. Start with climate change: according to a report from NASA and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, 2014 was the hottest year on record. …...


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A Cognitive Researcher Explains How Male and Female Brains Aren’t So Different

The British cognitive researcher Gina Rippon tells TIME why male and female brains aren’t so different, explored in her book Gender and Our Brains A popular notion has it that a human being’s most important sex organ is the brain. You say it’s our behavior that’s different; our brains are strikingly similar. Why? This goes all the way back to Charles Darwin, who said that...

Batteries Are the Next Target in China’s Clean-Energy Conquest

Clean-energy promoters hailed Tesla’s announcement of plans for a Nevada “gigafactory”–a reference to the unit for measuring energy storage–back in 2014 as the dawn of a new American industry. The $5 billion facility would eventually produce millions of lithium-ion batteries for electric vehicles as well as energy storage on the grid. But behind the headlines,...

Electric Vehicles Are Here. Now We Need to Figure Out How to Charge Them

In the century since the dawn of the mass-market car, more than 100,000 gas stations have popped up along the country’s 4 million miles of roads and highways–and a stop to refuel became a crucial part of the quintessential U.S. road trip. But the heyday of the gas station as a place to refuel is probably drawing to a close. Analysts project that sales of electric vehicles will...

Electronic Play Dough

How do you entice kids to learn about electronics? By updating a classic toy that most people already love. That’s the idea fueling London-based Tech Will Save Us and its Dough Universe modeling clay, a Play-Doh-like substance designed to help kids create working electronic circuits. Thanks to the clay’s conductive makeup–including lemon, salt and water–it can be mashed...

Roads? Where We’re Going …

UBER The transportation company is planning to test a program called Uber Elevate, an on-demand network of vertical-takeoff-and-landing electric air taxis for urban areas, as early as 2020. KITTY HAWK A Silicon Valley company backed by Google co-founder Larry Page is working on the Kitty Hawk Flyer, an electric aircraft designed to operate over water and doesn’t require a pilot’s...

Ron Chernow Talks Grant, Hamilton and American Legacies

Above the entrance to Grant’s Tomb in New York City, figures representing Peace and Victory frame an inscription. The slogan’s brevity belies the difficulty of the idea: Let us have peace. On a recent afternoon, the biographer Ron Chernow perched on a nearby bench to discuss his latest offering, Grant, a sweeping study of the Civil War general and U.S. President whose body lies...

The Cheap(er) Private Jet

Private-jet ownership has long been the domain of the ultrawealthy, with costs running into the tens of millions of dollars even before the crew and fuel are factored in. A new jet from aircraftmaker Cirrus could change that. Starting at just under $2 million, the Cirrus Vision Jet is a single-engine private jet designed to be flown by its owner, not a professional pilot, with some training and an...

The Rise of the Pea: How an Unassuming Legume Emerged as a Frontrunner in the Race to Replace Meat and Dairy

No one denies peas are nutritious. Whether they’re delicious—that’s debatable. But arguments over taste no longer matter because peas, specifically yellow peas, are being formulated into so many products, they’re unavoidable, and often invisible. As a crop, the pea has risen and fallen in favor, but today everyone seems to agree that it checks the box against the biggest...

The Tragedies of 2017 Will Test the Bonds That Connect Us, Now and for Years to Come

If you could see grief on a map, there would be rings of anguish radiating from whole regions of the U.S. right now. From Texas to Florida to Puerto Rico and Las Vegas, the hurt would expand with each person affected to the people they’re connected with in all parts of the country. No state would remain untouched by the events of 2017. The magnitude of the suffering over the past few...

What President Trump’s Tariff on Solar Panels Means for American Jobs

Jim Lamon is just the kind of businessman that Donald Trump would like. And Lamon is the kind of businessman who likes Trump. The CEO of DEPCOM Power grew up in Alabama, served six years in the Air Force and spent decades constructing coal-fired power plants. He’s given thousands of dollars to GOP causes, including Trump’s victory fund. But a few years ago, Lamon saw that...