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2,507 articles from NASA


SUNDAY 16. DECEMBER 2007


Is a New Solar Cycle About to Begin?

The solar physics community is abuzz this week. No, there haven't been any great eruptions or solar storms. The source of the excitement is a modest knot of magnetism that popped up on the sun, possibly heralding the start of a new solar cycle.


WEDNESDAY 12. DECEMBER 2007


NASA Spacecraft Make New Discoveries about Northern Lights

NASA's fleet of THEMIS satellites have made some surprising new discoveries about outbursts of Northern Lights and the source of their power. The discoveries include giant magnetic ropes that connect Earth to the Sun and explosions in the outskirts of Earth's magnetic field.


THURSDAY 6. DECEMBER 2007



MONDAY 3. DECEMBER 2007


Asteroid Shower

Mark your calendar: The best meteor shower of 2007 peaks on Friday, December 14th.


SATURDAY 1. DECEMBER 2007


Improving Drought Forecasts

From the deserts of the American southwest to the pine forests of the Deep South, drought-weary residents have one thing on their minds: "I wish it would rain!" Technically, what they should be wishing for is "more streamflow." Find out why in today's story.


WEDNESDAY 28. NOVEMBER 2007


Chandra Discovers a Cosmic Cannonball

Astronomers using NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory have discovered one of the fastest stars ever seen--a "cosmic cannonball" that is challenging theories to explain its blistering speed.


SATURDAY 24. NOVEMBER 2007


Watch Out for Flying Moondust

New research by NASA scientists shows that moondust kicked up by the jets of lunar landers can go on a fantastic journey, completely circling the Moon before settling back to the ground. This interesting phenomenon may affect the planning of lunar outposts and other activities as NASA prepares its return to the Moon.


THURSDAY 22. NOVEMBER 2007


Mars Doubles in Brightness

During the past month, Mars has doubled in brightness and now it is putting a nice show for backyard stargazers. A good night to look is Nov. 26th when Mars has an eye-catching close encounter with the Moon.


WEDNESDAY 21. NOVEMBER 2007


Bargain Basement Satellites

NASA scientists have developed a fast and easy-to-build satellite named FASTSAT that could accelerate the pace of space exploration.


MONDAY 19. NOVEMBER 2007


Moon Rocket Parachute Tests a Success

How do you bring a 200,000-pound rocket booster back to Earth after it catapults its payload toward the moon? NASA has answered that question with a successful test of a giant "moon rocket" parachute in the Arizona desert.


TUESDAY 13. NOVEMBER 2007



SATURDAY 10. NOVEMBER 2007



WEDNESDAY 7. NOVEMBER 2007


Repair Shops for Broken DNA

NASA-supported scientists have discovered cellular repair shops where DNA broken by space radiation may be put back together again.


SATURDAY 3. NOVEMBER 2007


A Fantastic Monday Morning Sky Show

On Monday morning, Nov. 5th, space shuttle Discovery is scheduled to undock from the ISS while the pair are gliding over many US towns and cities. The two spaceships will cut across a glittering expanse of morning stars dotted by bright planets and a Venus-Moon conjunction. And don't forget the exploding comet! It all adds up to "A Fantastic Monday Morning Sky Show."


WEDNESDAY 17. OCTOBER 2007


The Fantastic Skies of Orphan Stars

Do you love gazing at a starry night sky? Nothing you've ever seen on Earth could prepare you for the fantastic skies of some "orphan stars" just discovered by astronomers using NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory.


FRIDAY 12. OCTOBER 2007


New Lakes Discovered on Titan

The Cassini spacecraft has discovered three new lakes near the south pole of Saturn's moon Titan. These strange bodies are filled not with water but liquid methane and ethane. Researchers are also studying a lake near Titan's north pole larger than Lake Superior.


THURSDAY 11. OCTOBER 2007


Giant Atmospheric Waves Sighted Over Iowa

Last week, cameras in Iowa captured a giant atmospheric wave passing over Des Moines--see the movie in today's story. Atmospheric scientists believe these waves, called undular bores, may be more common and important than previously thought.


THURSDAY 4. OCTOBER 2007


Tones from Deep Space

Fifty years after the launch of Sputnik kicked off the Space Age, an ultra-modern probe heading for Pluto is using retro Sputnik-like tones to communicate with Earth.


MONDAY 1. OCTOBER 2007


The Sun Rips off a Comet's Tail

Earlier this year, Comet Encke was passing a little too close to the Sun when a coronal mass ejection (CME) hit the comet and ripped off its tail. NASA's STEREO spacecraft was watching and recorded a must-see movie featured in today's story.


SATURDAY 29. SEPTEMBER 2007


A New Lunar Impact Observatory

Researchers from the Marshall Space Flight Center have built a new "lunar impact" observatory in rural north Georgia. They're using it for their own cutting edge research and sharing the facility with local middle- and high-school students.


THURSDAY 27. SEPTEMBER 2007


Voyage to the Giant Asteroids--Liftoff!

NASA's Dawn spacecraft has left Earth on a mission to explore the giant asteroids Ceres and Vesta. Today's Science@NASA story explains the scientific reasons for making the trip.


WEDNESDAY 26. SEPTEMBER 2007


Blasting a Hole in a Comet: Take 2

Two years ago, NASA's Deep Impact spacecraft blasted a hole in Comet Tempel 1, offering researchers their first look inside a comet. One small problem: The cloud of debris was so thick no one could clearly see the crater. But now the dust has cleared and another NASA spacecraft is returning to the scene to examine the hole Deep Impact wrought.


SATURDAY 22. SEPTEMBER 2007


Cave Skylights Spotted on Mars

NASA's Mars orbiters have spotted "skylights" apparently leading to cavernous underground spaces on Mars. The discovery is fueling interest in potential underground habitats and sparking searches for caverns elsewhere on the Red Planet.


WEDNESDAY 19. SEPTEMBER 2007


A Giant Trilobite on the Sun

Last week scientists converged on the Living With a Star workshop to share the latest research in solar physics. At one point, nearly 200 participants sat slack-jawed as they watched a new movie recorded by Japan's Hinode spacecraft showing a sunspot emerging from the depths of the sun.