823,565 articles

New Sony president gets shareholder approval

(AP) — Kazuo Hirai, the former head of Sony's game division, won shareholder approval Wednesday to steer a turnaround at the struggling Japanese electronics giant as its new president and chief executive.

'Blade Runner' still subject of scientists' debate

(Reuters) - While South African athlete Oscar Pistorius attempts to become the first amputee runner to compete at the Olympic Games, scientists are still arguing whether his artificial limbs give him a critical advantage or not. Pistorius, born without fibulas and who had his lower legs amputated when a baby, uses carbon fibre prosthetic running blades and is hoping to qualify for the 400 metres...

'Blade Runner' still subject of scientists' debate

REUTERS - While South African athlete Oscar Pistorius attempts to become the first amputee runner to compete at the Olympic Games, scientists are still arguing whether his artificial limbs give him a critical advantage or not. Pistorius, born without fibulas and who had his lower legs amputated when a baby, uses carbon fibre prosthetic running blades and is hoping to qualify for the 400 metres at...

A step toward minute factories that produce medicine inside the body

Scientists are reporting an advance toward treating disease with minute capsules containing not drugs -- but the DNA and other biological machinery for making the drug. In an article in ACS' journal Nano Letters, they describe engineering micro- and nano-sized capsules that contain the genetically coded instructions, plus the read-out gear and assembly line for protein synthesis that can be...

Ability to estimate quantity increases in first 30 years of life

One of the basic elements of cognition -- the ability to estimate quantities -- grows more precise across the first 30 years or more of a person's life, according to researchers supported by the National Institutes of Health. This intuitive grasp of numbers, also called an approximate number sense, or ANS, is tied to concrete math skills at every stage of life, the researchers found.

AgriLife Research zeroes in on potato disease insect

Do potato psyllids migrate from one location to the next, starting in northern Mexico and moving northward as the potato season progresses, or are psyllid populations local?Knowing whether the insects are migratory or local could help more efficiently manage the insects which are increasingly inflicting damage on the country's potato industry, according to scientists working on the project.

Building a better Rift Valley fever vaccine

Researchers have significantly improved an existing experimental vaccine for Rift Valley fever virus, making possible the development of a more effective defense against the dangerous mosquito-borne pathogen.

Concerns over cost of dengue vaccine lessened with new study

Research funded by the Dengue Vaccine Initiative involving an economic analysis of producing a tetravalent dengue vaccine shows that the cost could be as low as $0.20 per dose with an annual production level of 60 million doses packaged in 10-dose vials. The study used data on a vaccine developed by US NIH and the facilities of the Instituto Butantan in Sao Paulo, Brazil.

Debby now exiting Florida's east coast, disorganized on satellite imagery

Debby has tracked across Florida from the Gulf coast to the Atlantic coast, and the interaction with land has taken its toll on the storm's organization. In GOES-13 satellite imagery today, June 27, the bulk of clouds and showers associated with Debby are now over the Atlantic Ocean and Debby's circulation center is seen exiting the state and moving into the Atlantic Ocean.

Dietary fiber alters gut bacteria, supports gastrointestinal health

A University of Illinois study shows that dietary fiber promotes a shift in the gut toward different types of beneficial bacteria."When we understand what kinds of fiber best nurture these health-promoting bacteria, we should be able to modify imbalances to support and improve gastrointestinal health," said Kelly Swanson, a University of Illinois professor of animal sciences.

Dying trees in Southwest set stage for erosion, water loss in Colorado River

New research concludes that a one-two punch of drought and mountain pine beetle attacks are the primary forces that have killed more than 2.5 million acres of pinyon pine and juniper trees in the American Southwest during the past 15 years, setting the stage for further ecological disruption -- including more water loss in the Colorado River basin.