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NASA sees sun send out mid-level solar flare

A new image was captured by NASA's Solar Dynamics Observatory on July 19, 2012 of an M7.7 class solar flare. The image represents light in the 131 Angstrom wavelength, which is particularly good for seeing flares, and which is typically colorized in teal.

What would Batman eat?

Researches examined whether the priming of a role model's food choices or the priming of healthy foods could influence children to make healthier fast food choices. Forty-five percent of the children selected apple fries after being shown pictures of superheroes and other role models, compared to 9 percent who chose apple fries with no superhero prompts. Parents using this tactic with their kids...

Fastest-growing cities not the most prosperous

As communities seek new ways to emerge from the recession, many may look to growing their population as a strategy. However, the belief that population growth will bring jobs and economic prosperity for local residents is a myth.

How to build a middleweight black hole: New model for intermediate black hole formation parallels growth of giant planets

A new model shows how an elusive type of black hole can be formed in the gas surrounding their supermassive counterparts. In new research, scientists propose that intermediate-mass black holes -- light-swallowing celestial objects with masses ranging from hundreds to many thousands of times the mass of the sun -- can grow in the gas disks around supermassive black holes in the centers of...

Progress in search for neutrino-less double-beta decay of Xenon-136

Physicists recently reported results of an experiment conducted in a salt mine one-half mile under Carlsbad, N.M., part of a decades-long search for evidence of the elusive neutrino-less double-beta decay of Xenon-136. They succeeded in setting a new lower limit for the half-life of this ephemeral nuclear decay. Though no one has yet seen it, important progress was...

Success of pink bacteria in oceans of the world

Researchers have now discovered that, through plasmids, representatives of the Roseobacter group may exchange such important genetic characteristics as the capability to perform photosynthesis. This type of horizontal gene transfer across the species boundary might make it possible for bacteria of the Roseobacter clade to quickly and effectively conquer new ecological...

Skin has an internal clock

Human skin has an internal clock responsible for the time-based steering of its repair and regeneration, among other things. Our skin is one of the body’s essential organs and perhaps the most versatile: Besides representative, communicative and sensory functions, it serves as our body’s boundary to the environment, forms an active and passive barrier against germs and helps keeping conditions...

New agents join the fight against antibiotic-resistant bacteria

The World Health Organization (WHO) has named antimicrobial resistance one of the most important threats to human health. Scientists have now demonstrated that a new class of chemically produced antimicrobial agents could become a future infection treatment alternative. These findings are another advance for researchers in the fight against antibiotic-resistant...

Scientists have developed a way to detect superparasites

Scientists have made a breakthrough in bridging high tech molecular biology research on microbial pathogens and the needs of the poorest of the poor. After sequencing the complete genome of Leishmania donovani (a parasite causing one of the most important tropical diseases after malaria) in hundreds of clinical isolates, they identified a series of mutations specific of ‘superparasites’ and...

You may never need to clean your car again, thanks to new coating technology

A new coating with self-repairing surface functionality has been developed. Researchers in the Netherlands have developed a coating with a surface that repairs itself after damage. This new coating has numerous potential applications -- for example mobile phones that will remain clean from fingerprints, cars that never need to be washed, and aircraft that need less frequent...

How Solving Media is Solving Crimes

It's not just prospective customers, partners or employers who may be scanning the social media landscape to glean information about you and your organization. The long arm of the law has joined the party as well, a new survey shows. So if you happen to have criminal intent, this might be a good time to lay low and forgo trolling for "Likes" on Facebook.

Short-term intestinal parasite infection triggers specific cytokines that can prevent the development of type 1 diabetes

Short-term infection with intestinal worms may provide long-term protection against type I diabetes (TID), suggests a new study. The incidence of TID is relatively low in developing countries. One explanation for this phenomenon is the prevalence of chronic intestinal worm infections, which dampen the self-aggressive T cells that cause diabetes and other autoimmune...