802,939 articles

At a crossroads: New research predicts which cars are likeliest to run lights at intersections

In 2008, according to the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, 2.3 million automobile crashes occurred at intersections across the United States, resulting in some 7,000 deaths. More than 700 of those fatalities were due to drivers running red lights. But, according to the Insurance Institute for Highway Safety, half of the people killed in such accidents are not the drivers who ran the...

Bacterial attachment mimics the just-in-time industrial delivery model

(PhysOrg.com) -- In the human world of manufacturing, many companies are now applying an on-demand, just-in-time strategy to conserve resources, reduce costs and promote production of goods precisely when and where they are most needed. A recent study from Indiana University Bloomington scientists reveals that bacteria have evolved a similar just-in-time strategy to constrain production of an...

Big success with tiny crystals

A little piece of iron wire is magnetic – just like a huge iron rod.  When it comes to material properties, size usually does not matter. Surprisingly, researchers from Austria and India have now discovered that some materials show very unusual behavior, when they are studied in the form of tiny crystals. This could now lead to new materials with tailor-made electronic and magnetic...

Could Curiosity determine if Viking found life on Mars?

One of the most controversial and long-debated aspects of Mars exploration has been the results of the Viking landers’ life-detection experiments back in the 1970s. While the preliminary findings were consistent with the presence of bacteria (or something similar) in the soil samples, the lack of organics found by other instruments forced most scientists to conclude that the life-like...

Measuring mental aftershocks

The massive 8.8-magnitude earthquake that struck Chile in February 2010 left thousands homeless, caused billions of dollars in damages and triggered a deadly tsunami. The psychological impact of such traumatic events over time is the focus of an ongoing research collaboration between UC Irvine psychologists and Chilean academic and government officials.

Researchers explore how cyber-attackers think like regular crooks

In a unique collaboration, an engineer and a criminologist at the University of Maryland are applying criminological concepts and research methods in the study of cybercrime. Their work has produced recommendations for IT managers to use in the prevention of cyber attacks on their networks.

Researches find poop-throwing by chimps is a sign of intelligence

(PhysOrg.com) -- A lot of people who have gone to the zoo have become the targets of feces thrown by apes or monkeys, and left no doubt wondering about the so-called intellectual capacity of a beast that would resort to such foul play. Now however, researchers studying such behavior have come to the conclusion that throwing feces, or any object really, is actually a sign of high ordered behavior....

Scissors-type trilayer giant magnetoresistive sensor using heusler alloy ferromagnet

Japanese researchers have demonstrated a scissors-type trilayer magnetoresistance device that is promising for narrow readers of ultra-high density hard disk drives (HDD). This device uses an antiferromagnetic interlayer exchange coupling of two Heusler alloy ferromagnetic (FM) layers separated by a thin silver layer. Since the magnetization of the two FM layers rotate around each other like...

Statistically significant

When the statistician for UC Irvine’s innovative Down syndrome program retired last year, its researchers were left in a bind. The group is studying ways to prevent or delay the onset of Alzheimer’s-type dementia in people with Down syndrome, including examining possible links between seizures and cognitive decline.

Ten years of research on nano materials

In the past decade numerous projects on the risks associated with nanomaterials have been initiated and carried out. In general, they dealt with the subject of how nanomaterials could be used without representing a danger to the environment and human health. However a lack of specialists is preventing further urgently needed studies in the field of nano(eco)toxicology from being undertaken. In...

The human cost of Russia's lost spacecraft

It hasn’t been a great year for Roscosmos, the Russian Federal Space Agency. In the last twelve months, it has lost four major missions on top of the aerospace industry’s failure to produce its planned number of spacecraft.

The swirling of wine helps bioreactors to run better (w/ video)

Every wine aficionado knows that wine has to be swirled in a glass in order for it to release its aroma. Applied to biotechnologies over some fifteen years, this ordinary gesture has made it possible to develop more efficient machines for culturing proteins in animal cells. The phenomenon has been studied in detail at EPFL (Switzerland).