823,565 articles

Online Gambling Fight Now About When, Who -- Not If

The fight to fully legalize online gambling in the U.S. is now less about whether Americans will be able to play and more about who will bring the action to them -- and when. A recent U.S. Justice Department opinion opened the door for cash-strapped states and their lotteries to bring online gambling to their residents, as long as it does not involve sports betting. The DOJ memo also...

A call for an evolved understanding of emotion

(Medical Xpress) -- Many scientists believe that all people experience and express the same biologically “basic” emotions — an idea they have attributed to evolutionist Charles Darwin and one that has shaped modern security training and law enforcement techniques.

Can robots take over rehab?

Visiting the iMove center at UC Irvine's Gross Hall is like being on the set of a sci-fi movie. Here, the merging of machines and humans — the premise of such futuristic films as "Alien" and "The Terminator" — has become a reality.

Exercise is good for your waistline -- but it`s a writing exercise

(Medical Xpress) -- Is losing weight as simple as doing a 15-minute writing exercise? In a new study published in Psychological Science, a journal of the Association for Psychological Science, women who wrote about their most important values, like close relationships, music, or religion, lost more weight over the next few months than women who did not have that experience.

Healthy living beyond the New Year's resolution

Some of the most popular New Year’s resolutions are to lose weight, eat healthier and work out more. Greg Cloutier from Northeastern’s Bouvé College of Health Sciences shares his exercise physiology and nutrition expertise to help people turn their New Year’s resolutions into permanent lifestyle changes.

How good are your horse's brakes?

Horseriding is a popular summer holiday activity, but few people know that horses kill more Australians annually than any other animal. Professor Paul McGreevy, from the University of Sydney's Faculty of Veterinary Science, is working on ways to 'check the brakes' on horses to ensure that they slow down on cue, saving both the horses and their riders.

In ancient Pompeii, trash and tombs went hand in hand

(PhysOrg.com) -- Cemeteries in ancient Pompeii were “mixed-use developments” with a variety of purposes that included serving as an appropriate site to toss out the trash. That’s according to findings from University of Cincinnati research at Pompeii to be presented Jan. 7, 2012, at the annual meeting of the Archaeological Institute of America by UC doctoral student Allison...

Research team suggests rock found in Russia an extraterrestrial quasicrystal

(PhysOrg.com) -- Sometimes in science, the journey is just as interesting as the findings, and that certainly appears to be the case with a disparate group of scientists and their involvement with a simple rock found in a remote part of Russia. That simple rock, which has been identified as a quasicrystal, is, according to team who has been doing research on it, as they report in PNAS, most likely...

Stellar discovery

On August 24, astrophysicist Peter Nugent was playing a little catch-up. Nugent, an adjunct professor at Berkeley and group leader of the Computational Cosmology Center at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, settled in to look at data collected overnight by the Palomar Transient Factory (PTF). This fully automated survey based at Caltech searches for transients, a catch-all term for as yet...

Sunn hemp shows promise as biofuel source

Work by scientists at the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) suggests that farmers in the Southeast could use the tropical legume sunn hemp (Crotalaria juncea) in their crop rotations by harvesting the fast-growing annual for biofuel. The study, which was conducted by Agricultural Research Service (ARS) scientists in Florence, S.C., supports the USDA priority of finding new sources of...

Trapping butterfly wings' qualities

Butterflies have inspired humans since the time of ancient Egypt, but now they're also inspiring researchers to look toward nature to help create the next generation of waterproof materials for electronics and sensors.