829,918 articles

Annals of Internal Medicine tip sheet, Jan. 17, 2012

Below is information about articles being published in the Jan. 17 issue of Annals of Internal Medicine. The information is not intended to substitute for the full articles as sources of information. Annals of Internal Medicine attribution is required for all coverage.

Are you certain, Mr. Heisenberg?

Heisenberg's uncertainty principle is one of the foundations of quantum physics. Recent experiments show that Heisenberg's view of quantum uncertainty was not complete.

Broken arm? Brain shifts quickly when using a sling or cast

Using a sling or cast after injuring an arm may cause your brain to shift quickly to adjust, according to a study published in the Jan. 17, 2012, print issue of Neurology, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. The study found increases in the size of brain areas that were compensating for the injured side, and decreases in areas that were not being used due to the cast or...

Climate adaptation difficult for Europe's birds

For the past 20 years, the climate in Europe has been getting warmer. Species of bird and butterfly which thrive in cool temperatures therefore need to move further north. However, they have difficulty adapting to the warmer climate quickly enough, as shown by new research published in the journal Nature Climate Change.

Combining 2 anti-HER2 drugs may provide better preoperative breast cancer treatment

Using two drugs that inhibit the growth factor HER2 for preoperative treatment of early-stage HER2-positive breast cancer appears to have better results than treatment with a single agent. An international research team reports that a protocol adding lapatinib (Tykerb) to trastuzumab (Herceptin) was more effective than single-drug treatment with either drug in eliminating microscopic signs of...

Declines in melanoma deaths limited to the most educated

A new study from the American Cancer Society finds recent declines in melanoma mortality rates in non-Hispanic Whites in the US mainly reflect declines in those with the highest level of education, and reveals a widening disparity in melanoma mortality rates by education.

Does the La Niña weather pattern lead to flu pandemics?

Worldwide pandemics of influenza caused widespread death and illness in 1918, 1957, 1968 and 2009. A new study examining weather patterns around the time of these pandemics finds that each of them was preceded by La Niña conditions in the equatorial Pacific. Since the La Niña pattern is known to alter the migratory patterns of birds, the scientists theorize that altered migration patterns...

Drug affordability affects 1 in 10 Canadians

One in 10 Canadians have problems affording medications they have been prescribed, and one in four people without drug insurance cannot afford to have their prescriptions filled, according to a study in Canadian Medical Association Journal.

Female feticide in Canada requires action

Canada should prohibit disclosure of the sex of a fetus until after 30 weeks of pregnancy to combat female feticide which is practiced by some ethnic groups in Canada and the United States, states an editorial in Canadian Medical Association Journal.

Fewer children require hospitalization following drowning-related incidents

Fewer children required hospitalization following a drowning incident over the last two decades, according to a new study from the Johns Hopkins Center for Injury Research and Policy. According to the study, pediatric hospitalizations from drowning-related incidents declined 51 percent from 1993 to 2008. The rates declined significantly for all ages and for both genders, although drowning-related...

How immune cells destroy cancer cells - MDC researchers elucidate mechanism

In the treatment of large tumors, how effective is adoptive T cell therapy in comparison to drug-based cancer treatment? Researchers in Berlin, Germany and in Duarte, California, USA showed that both forms of therapy are highly effective against large tumors. However, the T cells additionally destroy the tumor blood vessel system. Also "escapee" mutant tumor cells are eradicated that have become...

Improved ergonomics for wheelchair users

Empa engineers, together with the firm 'r going', have succeeded in developing an ergonomic seat for electric wheelchairs which encourages the user to move around frequently. True to the motto 'life is movement' the aim is to enhance the freedom of movement of wheelchair users with a range of disabilities.

MSU researchers identify path to treat Parkinson's disease at its inception

Imagine if doctors could spot Parkinson's disease at its inception and treat the protein that triggers it before the disease can sicken the patient. A team of researchers led by Basir Ahmad, a postdoctoral researcher at Michigan State University, has demonstrated that slow-wriggling alpha-synuclein proteins are the cause of aggregation, or clumping together, which is the first step of Parkinson's....

New gene discovery unlocks mystery to epilepsy in infants

A team of Australian researchers has come a step closer to unlocking a mystery that causes epileptic seizures in babies.Benign familial infantile epilepsy has been recognized for some time as infantile seizures, without fever, that run in families but the cause has so far eluded researchers. However, clinical researchers at the University of Melbourne and Florey Neurosciences Institute and...

No walk in the park: Factors that predict walking difficulty in elderly

Yale School of Medicine researchers have found that the likelihood of becoming disabled with age increases with the following factors: having a chronic condition or cognitive impairment; low physical activity; slower gross motor coordination; having poor lower-extremity function; and being hospitalized. Women are also more likely than men to become disabled in their later years.

Planned actions improve the way we process information

Preparing to act in a particular way can improve the way we process information, and this has potential implications for those with learning disabilities. Researchers funded by the Economic and Social Research Council have shown that using a grabbing action with our hands can help our processing of visual information.

Powerful drug's surprising, simple method could lead to better treatments

With one simple experiment, University of Illinois chemists have debunked a widely held misconception about an often-prescribed drug. The researchers demonstrated that amphotericin, the top drug for treating systemic fungal infections, works by simply binding to a lipid molecule essential to yeast's physiology, a finding that could change the direction of drug development endeavors and could lead...