878,761 articles

Food science poised to help address needs of aging population

The aging baby boomers and subsequent generations will be looking to the food industry to provide products that can help them live longer, healthier and more active lives than previous generations, according to research presented at the Institute of Food Technologists' Wellness 12 meeting.

GOES satellite movie tracked tornadic Texas trouble

A powerful weather system moved through eastern Texas and dropped at least 15 tornadoes in the Dallas suburbs. NASA created an animation of data from NOAA's GOES-13 satellite that shows the frontal system moving through the region yesterday.

Greening up the blue dye in jeans, police uniforms and the red, white and blue

Efforts are underway to develop a more environmentally friendly process for dyeing denim with indigo, the storied "king of dyes," used to the tune of 50,000 tons annually to color cotton blue jeans and hundreds of other products. That effort is the topic of an article in the current edition of Chemical & Engineering News. C&EN is the weekly news magazine of the American Chemical Society, the...

Growing nitrous oxide levels explained

Australian, Korean and US scientists have generated a 65-year record of Southern Hemisphere nitrous oxide measurements, establishing a new benchmark against which to compare changes in the long-lived greenhouse gas that is also a major ozone-depleting substance.

How fat are your lab mice?

Researchers are increasingly aware that fat in some parts of the body is more harmful than fat in other places. To help determine how obesity works, scientists turn to animal models and now, they are able to visualize how much fat their lab rats are carrying and where they are storing it. The method will be published in the April issue of the Journal of Visualized Experiments.

How Usain Bolt can run faster -- effortlessly

Usain Bolt can achieve faster running times with no extra effort on his part or improvement to his fitness, according to a study published today in Significance, the magazine of the Royal Statistical Society and the American Statistical Association. Cambridge professor of Mathematical Sciences John D. Barrow illustrates how, based on concrete mathematical evidence, Bolt can cut his world record...

In-school tests suggest overweight boys and girls benefit from being fit

Improving or maintaining physical fitness appears to help obese and overweight children reach a healthy weight, reports a new study from the Friedman School of Nutrition Science and Policy at Tufts University. Researchers analyzed four years of data from in-school fitness tests and body mass index measurements of students in grades one through seven in the city of Cambridge, Mass.

Income inequality and distrust foster academic dishonesty

College professors and students are in an arms race over cheating. Students find new sources for pre-written term papers; professors find new ways to check the texts they get for plagiarized material. But why are all these young people cheating? A new study published in Psychological Science, a journal of the Association for Psychological Science, suggests one reason: income inequality, which...

Is rainfall a greater threat to China's agriculture than warming?

New research into the impact of climate change on Chinese cereal crops has found rainfall has a greater impact than rising temperature. The research, published in the Journal of the Science of Food and Agriculture found that while maize is sensitive to warming increases in temperature from 1980 onwards correlated with both higher and lower yields of rice and wheat.

JILA team demonstrates a new way of lasing: A 'superradiant' laser

Physicists at JILA have demonstrated a novel "superradiant" laser design, which has the potential to be 100 to 1,000 times more stable than the best conventional visible lasers. This type of laser could boost the performance of the most advanced atomic clocks and related technologies, such as communications and navigation systems as well as space-based astronomical instruments.

Legal review concerning the use of health impact assessments in non-health sectors

A report released today finds that a wide variety of existing laws offer important opportunities to improve Americans' health. The first comprehensive study of its kind found an unexpectedly large number of laws that facilitate the consideration of health effects, in fields such as transportation, energy, and agriculture. Many of these legal requirements may be satisfied by conducting health...

Listening to the radio even with an electric drive

To enable radio reception in electric vehicles, manufacturers must install filters and insulate cables, since electrical signals will otherwise interfere with music and speech transmissions. Now, using new calculation methods, researchers are paving the way for pure listening pleasure while also helping to lower the associated costs.

Memory declines faster in years closest to death

Two new studies published in the April 4 online issue of Neurology suggest that a person's memory declines at a faster rate in the last two-and-a-half years of life than at any other time. The second study shows that keeping mentally fit through activities may be the best way to preserve memory.

Mobile technology helps explore nicotine addiction

Some people quit smoking on the first try while others have to quit repeatedly. Using such mobile technology as hand-held computers and smartphones, a team of researchers from Penn State and the University of Pittsburgh is trying to find out why.

Mutations in 3 genes linked to autism spectrum disorders

Mutations in three new genes have been linked to autism, according to new studies including one with investigators at Mount Sinai School of Medicine. The findings, in a trio of papers revealing new genetic targets in autism, are published in the April 4th online issue of the journal Nature. The studies provide new insights into important genetic changes and the many biological pathways that lead...

New forage plant prepares farmers for climate changes

Plant researchers from the University of Copenhagen in Denmark, Monash University in Australia, and the plant breeding company Pacific Seeds have developed a new type of the corn-like crop sorghum, which may become very significant for food supplies in drought-prone areas. Unlike the conventional drought-resistant sorghum plant, which is an important crop in Africa, China and the USA, this new...