865,723 articles

Earth's Two Moons? It's Not Lunacy, But New Theory

In a spectacle that might have beguiled poets, lovers and songwriters if only they had been around to see it, Earth once had two moons, astronomers now think. But the smaller one smashed into the other in what is being called the "big splat." The result: Our planet was left with a single bulked-up and ever-so-slightly lopsided moon. The astronomers came up with the scenario to explain why...

Study: Healthy Eating Is Privilege of the Rich

A healthy diet is expensive and could make it difficult for Americans to meet new U.S. nutritional guidelines, according to a study published Thursday that says the government should do more to help consumers eat healthier. An update of what used to be known as a food pyramid in 2010 had called on Americans to eat more foods containing potassium, dietary fiber, vitamin D and calcium. But if...

Spacewalking Astronauts Release Mini-Satellite

Spacewalking astronauts released a ham radio satellite outside the International Space Station on Wednesday despite a missing antenna that will hamper operations. Russian Sergei Volkov let go of the boxy 57-pound (26-kilogram) satellite with his gloved hands, a few hours after Mission Control had put the operation on hold. But he and his spacewalking partner, Alexander Samokutyaev, ran out of...

Humans Evolved in Grassland, Not Forests?

A U.S. study questions the theory that early humans evolved in closed woodland in Africa and then moved to open savannah as they become bipedal. Researchers at the University of Utah say an analysis of fossil soils in regions associated with early hominins in eastern Africa 6 million years ago suggests our early ancestors evolved in a savannah-like environment with less than 40 percent tree...

Green: E.P.A. Is 'Greening the Apple'

The agency's New York City blog covers anything from dredging in the Hudson River to goings-on at local Superfund sites to the Energy Star program's efforts to make religious congregations more energy-efficient.

Poorly controlled asthma costly, study finds

Poorly controlled asthma more than doubles health-care costs associated with the disease and threatens educational achievement through a dramatic increase in school absence, according to researchers. It highlights the toll that poorly controlled asthma takes on children. It also points to an...

Bypassing stem cells, scientists make neurons directly from human skin

Researchers have come up with a recipe for making functional neurons directly from human skin cells, including those taken from patients with Alzheimer's disease. The new method may offer a critical short cut for generating neurons for replacement therapies of the future, according to research published in the August 5th issue of the journal Cell, a Cell Press publication. Already, the converted...

Hormone reduces risk of heart failure from chemotherapy

Recent studies have shown that the heart contains cardiac stem cells that can contribute to regeneration and healing during disease and aging. However, little is known about the molecules and pathways that regulate these cells. Now, a new study utilizing a heart failure model is providing insight into one way to coax the cardiac stem cells into repairing the damaged heart. The research, published...

Making sperm from stem cells in a dish

Researchers have found a way to turn mouse embryonic stem cells into sperm. This finding, reported in the journal Cell in a special online release on August 4th, opens up new avenues for infertility research and treatment. A Kyoto University team has coaxed mouse embryonic stem cells into sperm precursors, called primordial germ cells (PGCs), and shown that these cells can give rise to healthy...

Minimal scar techniques in living donors for kidney transplant

Kidney transplant from a living donor, besides of being the best option for young people and those affected by particular conditions, results in increased organ survival and solves in part the organ shortage afflicting Spain since the mid-90 despite the high rate of cadaveric donation.

Molecular mechanisms offer hope for new pain treatments

By working with individuals suffering from a severe disorder that causes sensory neurons to degenerate, researchers at the University of Montreal Hospital and CHU Sainte-Justine Hospital have discovered how a specific genetic mutation causes their patients' condition, which in turn has revealed more information about the mechanisms in our bodies which enable us to sense pain. Genetic mutations are...

Mutation linked with the absence of fingerprints

Scientists have identified a mutation that might underlie an extremely rare condition, called "adermatoglyphia," which causes people to be born without any fingerprints. The research, published by Cell Press online August 4th in The American Journal of Human Genetics, not only provides valuable insight into the genetic basis of adermatoglyphia and of typical fingerprint formation but also...

New thermodynamic model predicts plutonium solubility with iron

A hard-to-detect but stable form of iron helps convert subsurface plutonium from barely to very soluble, according to scientists at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory and Rai Enviro-Chem, LLC. Plutonium resides underground at weapons sites around the world. In one form, abbreviated Pu(IV), it essentially stays put. But when soluble iron and a stable iron are present the plutonium becomes...

Novel DNA-sensing pathway in immune response to malaria

Until very recently, it was unclear why infection with malaria causes fever and, under severe circumstances, an infectious death. Although the parasite has an abundance of potentially toxic molecules, no one knew which ones were responsible for the inflammatory syndrome associated with disease. Now, a new study identifies a novel DNA-sensing mechanism that plays a role in the innate immune...