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El Mayor-Cucapah earthquake was simple on surface, complicated at depth, new data show

Like scars that remain on the skin long after a wound has healed, earthquake fault lines can be traced on Earth's surface long after their initial rupture. Typically, this line of intersection between the area where the fault slips and the ground is more complicated at the surface than at depth. But a new study of the April 4, 2010, El Mayor-Cucapah earthquake in Mexico reveals a reversal of this...

Hydrogen provides energy for bacteria in 'extreme' habitats

In deep ocean waters, some organisms can thrive in a presumably hostile type of ecosystem: hydrothermal vents, which have been the focus of extensive research for more than 30 years. Today, an international study reveals for the first time that bacteria living in association with hydrothermal mussels are capable of using hydrogen as an energy source to produce organic...

Fall Travel Deals Will Heat Up as Weather Cools Down (ContributorNetwork)

ContributorNetwork - Perhaps the best part of what turned out to be an expensive summer travel season is the forthcoming end. Late summer and early fall travel deals are coming fast and furious, which is something just about every traveler should be excited about. Anyone who had fall travel dates, such as Halloween vacations, that waited to book airfares has the chance to take advantage of some...

Alien world is blacker than coal

Astronomers have discovered the darkest known exoplanet - a distant, Jupiter-sized gas giant known as TrES-2b. Their measurements show that TrES-2b reflects less than one percent of the sunlight falling on it, making it blacker than coal or any planet or moon in our solar system.

Coherent diffractive imaging in living color

(PhysOrg.com) -- Exactly 150 years after the first color photograph was produced, scientists have devised a way of employing the full spectrum of colors from synchrotron and free-electron laser x radiation to image nanometer-sized subjects with unprecedented clarity and speed, and in three dimensions. This new research technique is expected to improve imaging on the nanoscale in the quest for...

Coke addicts prefer money in hand to snowy future

When a research team asked cocaine addicts to choose, hypothetically, between money now or cocaine of greater value later, "preference was almost exclusively for the money now," said Warren K., Bickel, professor in the Virginia Tech Carilion Research Institute, director of the Advanced Recovery Research Center, and professor of psychology in the College of Science at Virginia Tech. This result is...

Contact lost with hypersonic glider after launch

An unmanned hypersonic glider developed for U.S. defense research into super-fast global strike capability was launched atop a rocket early Thursday but contact was lost after the experimental craft began flying on its own, the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency said.

Controversial energy-generating system lacking credibility (w/ video)

(PhysOrg.com) -- It's been seven months since Italian physicists Andrea Rossi and Sergio Focardi publicly demonstrated a device that they claimed could generate large amounts of excess heat through some kind of low-energy nuclear reaction (LENR). (Previous descriptions of the process as “cold fusion” are incorrect; although the process is not completely understood, it is likely a weak...

DC-8 flying lab validates laser instruments

(PhysOrg.com) -- Twenty scientists went aloft aboard NASA’s DC-8 flying laboratory in late July to conduct an airborne test of four very different laser techniques for remotely measuring atmospheric carbon dioxide and two laser instruments that remotely measured oxygen. The DC-8 also carried two “truth” instruments – devices that are known to produce accurate data – that...

Facial recognition in use after riots

(AP) -- Facial recognition technology being considered for London's 2012 Games is getting a workout in the wake of Britain's riots, a law enforcement official told The Associated Press on Thursday, with officers feeding photographs of suspects through Scotland Yard's newly updated face-matching program.

Fold mountains slip on soft areas

The Zagros Mountains are well researched from a geological perspective. However, scientists at the ETH Zurich have now used computer simulations to demonstrate for the first time how it came about that mainly folds with almost constant wavelengths of 14 kilometers were formed.

For bugs within bugs within mealybugs, life is a 'patchwork'

Bacteria may have bad reputations but in fact, all animals -- us included -- rely on them in critical ways. In the case of sap-feeding insects, intimate associations with microbes offer a source for essential nutrients that their sugary diets just don't include. Now, researchers reporting in the August 11th Current Biology, a Cell Press publication, have new insight into organisms that have taken...

In quest for new therapies, team unlocks hidden information in human genome

The work of molecular biologist Joseph M. Miano, Ph.D., and clinician Craig Benson, M.D., seems worlds apart: Miano helps head the Aab Cardiovascular Research Institute and Benson is chief resident of the combined Internal Medicine and Pediatrics program at the University of Rochester Medical Center. Though the chance of their professional paths crossing was highly unlikely, shared enthusiasm,...