802,939 articles

Questioning the safety of certain 'healthful' plant-based antioxidants

Scientists are calling for more research on the possibility that some supposedly healthful plant-based antioxidants - including those renowned for their apparent ability to prevent cancer - may actually aggravate or even cause cancer in some individuals. Their recommendation follows a study in which two such antioxidants - quercetin and ferulic acid - appeared to aggravate kidney cancer in...

Reading food labels, combined with exercise, can lead to weight loss

Nutritional science and food marketing has become so sophisticated in recent decades that a trip to the supermarket can require a complete nutritional re-education. The average consumer needs to be on guard against preservatives, added fat, colorings, and calories, false advertising, and sophisticated but misleading labels. Although guidelines for the information of food labels have gotten a bad...

Researchers hear puzzling new physics from graphene quartet's quantum harmonies

Using a one-of-a-kind instrument designed and built at the National Institute of Standards and Technology, an international team of researchers have "unveiled" a quartet of graphene's electron states and discovered that electrons in graphene can split up into an unexpected and tantalizing set of energy levels when exposed to extremely low temperatures and extremely high magnetic fields.

Safety not compromised in alternative birthing rooms

Giving birth in an alternative setting within a hospital ? like a bed-free birthing room or one designed to be "homelike"? is just as safe for healthy women as laboring in a traditional hospital bed and women who use these rooms are nearly twice as likely to be satisfied with their birth experiences, according to an updated Cochrane review.

Scientists identify molecular gatekeeper of arthritis

Elimination of a molecular gatekeeper leads to the development of arthritis in mice, scientists report in a study published in the Journal of Experimental Medicine. The newly discovered gatekeeper is a protein that determines the fate - survival or death - of damaging cells that mistakenly attack the body's own tissues and lead to autoimmune disorders such as arthritis.

Single gene regulates motor neurons in spinal cord

In a surprising and unexpected discovery, scientists at NYU Langone Medical Center have found that a single type of gene acts as a master organizer of motor neurons in the spinal cord. The finding, published in the September 9, 2010 issue of Neuron, could help scientists develop new treatments for diseases such as Lou Gehrig's disease or spinal cord injury.

Study adds new clue to how last ice age ended

As the last ice age was ending, about 13,000 years ago, a final blast of cold hit Europe, and for a thousand years or more, it felt like the ice age had returned. But oddly, despite bitter cold winters in the north, Antarctica was heating up. For the two decades since ice core records revealed that Europe was cooling at the same time Antarctica was warming over this thousand-year period,...

Study identifies critical 'traffic engineer' of the nervous system

A new University of Georgia study published in the journal Nature has identified a critical enzyme that keeps traffic flowing in the right direction in the nervous system, and the finding could eventually lead to new treatments for conditions such as Alzheimer's and Parkinson's disease.

Why chromosomes never tie their shoelaces

In the latest issue of the journal Nature, Miguel Godinho Ferreira, Principal Investigator at the Instituto Gulbenkian de Ciencia (IGC) in Portugal, lead a team of researchers to shed light on a paradox that has puzzled biologists since the discovery of telomeres, the protective tips of chromosomes: while broken chromosome ends generated by DNA damage (such as radiation or cigarette smoke) are...

U.S. Smoking Rate Deemed 'Tragic' by CDC

U.S. smoking rates continue to hold steady, at about one in five adults lighting up regularly, frustrated health officials reported Tuesday. About 21 percent of U.S. adults were smokers in 2009, about the same percentage as the year before, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. The smoking rate -- which fell dramatically since the 1960s -- has basically been flat since...

Microelectrodes Convert Thought Into Speech

U.S. researchers say they've translated brain signals into words, a step toward allowing severely paralyzed people to use their thoughts to "talk." University of Utah scientists translated signals generated by the brain into words using grids of microelectrodes implanted beneath the skull but atop the brain, a university release said Monday. "We have been able to decode spoken words using...

Microbes Are Eating BP Oil Without Using Up Oxygen

Government scientists studying the BP disaster are reporting the best possible outcome: Microbes are consuming the oil in the Gulf of Mexico without depleting the oxygen in the water and creating "dead zones" where fish cannot survive. Outside scientists said this so far vindicates the difficult and much-debated decision by BP PLC and the government to use massive amounts of chemical...

BP Report Blames Itself and Others for Oil Spill

Oil giant BP PLC laid much of the blame for the rig explosion and the massive Gulf of Mexico spill on itself, other companies' workers and a complex series of failures in an internal report released Wednesday before a key piece of evidence has been fully analyzed. In its 193-page report posted on its Web site, the British company described the incident as an accident that arose from a complex...

Iraq Displays Hundreds of Recovered Artifacts

Iraq displayed hundreds of recovered artifacts Tuesday that were among the country's looted heritage and span the ages from a 4,400-year-old statue of a Sumerian king to a chrome-plated AK-47 bearing Saddam Hussein's image. The 542 pieces are among the most recent artifacts recovered from a heartbreaking frenzy of looting at museums and archaeological sites after the 2003 U.S.-led invasion and...