878,761 articles

Astronomers find first planet from another galaxy (w/ Video)

(PhysOrg.com) -- An exoplanet orbiting a star that entered our Milky Way from another galaxy has been detected by a European team of astronomers using the MPG/ESO 2.2-meter telescope at ESO's La Silla Observatory in Chile. The Jupiter-like planet is particularly unusual, as it is orbiting a star nearing the end of its life and could be about to be engulfed by it, giving tantalizing clues about the...

Economic downturn takes toll on health of Americans with heart disease, diabetes or cancer

A new poll from researchers at the Harvard School of Public Health (HSPH) and Knowledge Networks (KN) shows that many people with heart disease, diabetes or cancer believe the economic downturn is hurting their health and will have further negative impacts in the future. Many Americans with these illnesses face financial problems paying for medical bills in this economy. Most of these people do...

FDA review on transgenic salmon too narrow: study

The review process being used by the Food and Drug Administration to assess the safety of a faster-growing transgenic salmon fails to weigh the full effects of the fish's widespread production, according to analysis by a Duke University-led team in this week's Science.

Green Europe eyes farming revolution

In a radical overhaul of Europe's controversial Common Agricultural Policy (CAP), the European Commission on Thursday suggested a greener, fairer farming policy for the future, including a rethink of subsidies.

It takes a village: Mechanism alerts neighbors to amplify immune response

New research reveals a clever strategy that enables a host organism to outsmart an invading bacterium by counteracting its efforts to suppress the innate immune response. The study, published by Cell Press in the November 24th issue of the journal Immunity, describes a mechanism by which an infected cell can quickly alert unsuspecting (and uninfected) neighboring cells that can join the fight,...

Panama Canal, Panama City at risk of large earthquake, says new research

New data suggest that the Limon and Pedro Miguel faults in Central Panama have ruptured both independently and in unison over the past 1400 years, indicating a significant seismic risk for Panama City and the Panama Canal, according to research published today by the Bulletin of the Seismological Society of America (BSSA).

Researchers identify PTSD measures for use in traumatic brain injury research

Five U.S. federal agencies recently cosponsored a set of expert work groups to formulate common data elements for research related to psychological adjustment and traumatic brain injury (TBI). Danny G. Kaloupek, PhD, associate professor of psychiatry and behavioral neuroscience at Boston University School of Medicine, chaired the work group on posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Dr. Kaloupek's...

Scientists report molecular structure of dopamine receptor

A team led by scientists at The Scripps Research Institute has solved the structure of one of the receptors that responds to the neurotransmitter dopamine. Although dopamine transmission is essential to normal brain functioning, the biological assembly of the molecules involved in this crucial neuronal interplay had not been known—until now.

Spacecraft flew through 'snowstorm' on encounter with comet Hartley 2

On its recent trip by comet Hartley 2, the Deep Impact spacecraft took the first pictures of, and flew through, a storm of fluffy particles of water ice being spewed out by carbon dioxide jets coming from the rough ends of the comet. The resulting images and data shed new light on the nature and composition of comets, according to the University of Maryland-led EPOXI science team, which today...

Sweden to issue int'l warrant for Assange

(AP) -- The elusive Australian behind the biggest leak of U.S. war documents in history is wanted by Sweden in a drawn-out rape probe, and could soon face an international arrest warrant curtailing his ability to jump from one country to another.

Taking a break from osteoporosis drugs can protect bones

Taking time off from certain osteoporosis drugs may be beneficial to bone health, according to a study conducted at Loyola University Health System. Researchers found that bone density remained stable for three years in patients who took a drug holiday from bisphosphonates, a popular class of osteoporosis drugs that can cause fractures in the thigh bones and tissue decay in the jaw bone.

UCLA team uncovers mechanism behind organ transplant rejection

UCLA researchers have pinpointed the culprit behind chronic rejection of heart, lung and kidney transplants. Published in the Nov. 23 edition of Science Signaling, their findings suggest new therapeutic approaches for preventing transplant rejection and sabotaging cancer growth.

Well-known molecule may be behind alcohol's benefits to heart health

(PhysOrg.com) -- Many studies support the assertion that moderate drinking is beneficial when it comes to cardiovascular health, and for the first time scientists have discovered that a well-known molecule, called Notch, may be behind alcohol's protective effects. Down the road, this finding could help scientists create a new treatment for heart disease that mimics the beneficial influence of...

Wellness programs provide high returns, research reveals

Employee wellness programs have often been viewed as a nice extra, not a strategic imperative. But the data demonstrate otherwise, according to a team of researchers led by Leonard L. Berry of Texas A&M University, Ann M. Mirabito of Baylor University and William B. Baun of the University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center.

Hope for treatment of cocaine addiction: Block memories

Cocaine is one of the worst drug addictions to kick. But now researchers have found that a common beta blocker can prevent the retrieval of memories associated with cocaine addiction, a major reason many addicts experience relapse. In addition, the work has identified primary players in the brain responsible for "extinction" learning -- the ability to replace cocaine-associated memories with...

Social networking extends mobile battery life

A new approach to social networking for mobile devices, such as tablet PCs and smart phones could improve the user experience and boost battery life by up to 70% by exploiting shared data between users in the same location.