802,348 articles

Blossoms Of Maturity: Newly Discovered Signaling Pathway Ensures That Plants Remember To Flower

Plants normally flower in response to seasonal changes, such as those associated with the end of winter or beginning of spring. Scientists have now identified a signaling pathway that allows plants to blossom even without positive signals from the environment. The concentration of a small RNA snippet in plants cells operates like an hour glass: a decline in its level awakes the plant from its...

New Species Of Crustacean Discovered Near Canary Islands

During a cave diving expedition to explore the Tunnel de la Atlantida, the world's longest submarine lava tube on Lanzarote in the Canary Islands, a team of scientists and cave divers have discovered a previously unknown species of crustacean, belonging to the remipede genus...

Parkinson's Disease: When Cells Run Out Of Fuel

Insights into the function of Parkinson's genes can help to understand the causes of this neurodegenerative disease -- and to develop new therapies. Researchers have now discovered that two Parkinson's genes ensure the energy supply of neurons involved in Parkinson's disease.

Employees Who Are Engaged In Their Work Have Happier Home Life

Psychology researchers studied how positive work experiences extend into family life and facilitate family interactions. They found that employees who are engaged in their work, which includes higher levels of vigor, more dedication and absorption in daily activities, have better moods and more satisfaction at...

Many Online Social Networks Leak Personal Information To Tracking Sites, New Study Shows

More than a half billion people use online social networks, posting vast amounts of information about themselves to share with online friends and colleagues. A new study has found that the practices of many popular social networking sites typically make that personal information available to companies that track Web users' browsing habits, and allow them to link anonymous browsing habits to...

Scientists Shed New Light On Behavior Of Shark 'Tweens' And 'Teenagers'

Marine biologists have shown that young lemon sharks born in Bimini, Bahamas, tend to stay near their coastal birthplace for many years. Knowledge about these intermediate-aged animals -- the breeders of tomorrow -- has been limited. Thus, tropical island-nations that sacrifice their nursery habitats to coastal development are therefore likely to lose both babies and much older sharks, with...

Why 'Thick' Blood Protects From A Heart Attack

"Thick" blood can cause heart attack and stroke, but also prevent them. Scientists have explained the mechanism of this clinical paradox for the first time on an animal model. Mice with a greater tendency to form blood clots have larger plaques in their vessels, but they are more stable. Thus, there is less risk that these plaques will rupture and obstruct...

First Measure Of Africa's Coastal Forests: Swampy Mangrove Destruction Threatens Shrimp Farming

Impoverished fishermen along the coast of tropical African countries like Mozambique and Madagascar may have only a few more years to eke out a profit from one of their nations' biggest agricultural exports. Within a few decades, they may no longer have a livelihood at all. That's because swampy mangrove forests – essential breeding grounds for fish and shellfish in these countries – are being...

Shuttle fueled, Colbert gives launch a 'go' (AP)

AP - NASA fueled space shuttle Discovery for an early morning flight to the international space station on Tuesday as a TV comedian whose treadmill is on board gave a "go" for launch and urged, "Let's light this...

Study finds people who multitask often bad at it (AP)

AP - The people who multitask the most are the ones who are worst at it. That's the surprising conclusion of researchers at Stanford University, who found multitaskers are more easily distracted and less able to ignore irrelevant information than people who do less multitasking.

Barrier to keep Asian carp out of Great Lakes faces criticism

The last stand in the battle to keep Asian carp from invading the Great Lakes is under way. The Army Corps began tests last week to see whether it can permanently crank up the power on its new electrical fish barrier on the Chicago Sanitary and Ship Canal to a strength that will actually turn back all sizes of the fish.