865,723 articles

Nation's leading experts on substance abuse outline new research agenda

With substance abuse now accounting for one in 14 hospital admissions and generating billions in health care costs, leading scientists held a briefing on Capitol Hill today to present the evidence that we already have and the evidence we need in treating and preventing the use and abuse of alcohol, drugs and tobacco.

NEDD9 protein supports growth of aggressive breast cancer

Researchers at Fox Chase Cancer Center have demonstrated that a protein called NEDD9 may be required for some of the most aggressive forms of breast cancer to grow. According to the researchers, the protein could serve as a clinical biomarker to indicate the presence of aggressive forms of breast cancer. NEDD9 may also provide a target for some future therapeutic against metastatic cancer.

New findings show a quick rebound from marine mass extinction event

Researchers from MIT and their collaborators have done the most detailed analysis ever of a layer of sediments deposited during and immediately after the asteroid impact 65 million years ago that wiped out the dinosaurs and 80 percent of Earth's marine life. They found that at least some forms of microscopic marine life -- the so-called "primary producers," or photosynthetic organisms such as...

New Plywood Glue Made With Corn

After the oil is extracted from corn germ meal, the corn germ is typically fed to poultry and other livestock animals. But a new, value-added use could be on tap for this "leftover." Researchers have determined that corn germ can be used as a protein extender for plywood...

Pathways Of Movement Of Sudden Oak Death Pathogen Described

The pathogen that causes sudden oak death disease in California has a different genetic fingerprint than fungal strains found in nurseries in Oregon and Washington, according to scientists. This discovery will allow scientists to distinguish infections in other states as likely having originated from either California or the Pacific...

Princeton paleomagnetists put controversy to rest

Princeton University scientists have shown that, in ancient times, the Earth's magnetic field was structured like the two-pole model of today, suggesting that the methods geoscientists use to reconstruct the geography of early land masses on the globe are accurate. The findings may lead to a better understanding of historical continental movement, which relates to changes in climate.

Quick Rebound From Marine Mass Extinction Event, New Findings Show

Researchers have done the most detailed analysis ever of a layer of sediments deposited during and immediately after the asteroid impact 65 million years ago that wiped out the dinosaurs and 80 percent of Earth's marine life. They found that at least some forms of microscopic marine life -- the so-called "primary producers," or photosynthetic organisms such as algae and cyanobacteria in the ocean...

Study finds racial segregation a strong factor in learning disparities

Racial segregation in the schools is fueling the learning disparity between young black and white children, while out-of-school factors are more important to the growth of social class gaps, according to a study by Emory University sociologist Dennis Condron. His findings were published in the October issue of the American Sociological Review.

Super Typhoon Melor crossing Guam this weekend

Melor has become a Super Typhoon with sustained winds near 130 mph, and is crossing Guam and its islands this weekend. Warnings and watches are already up for the region. NASA's Aqua satellite measured the temperature of Melor's powerful thunderstorm tops.

The amazing maze of maize evolution

Understanding the evolution and domestication of maize is important for many researchers. As one of the most important crops worldwide and one that appears very different from its wild relatives because of domestication, understanding exactly how maize has evolved has many practical benefits and may help improve crop yields. Dr. Marina Dermastia and colleagues compared corn kernel development to...

The state of America's leadership

Contemporary leaders are less trusting, but also less cynical, than those in top positions nearly four decades ago, according to a new comprehensive survey of White House Fellows -- a group that includes more than 600 prominent leaders in nearly every sector of American society.

There's still time to cut the risk of climate catastrophe, MIT study shows

A new analysis of climate risk, published by researchers at MIT and elsewhere, shows that even moderate carbon-reduction policies now can substantially lower the risk of future climate change. It also shows that quick, global emissions reductions would be required in order to provide a good chance of avoiding a temperature increase of more than 2 degrees Celsius above the pre-industrial level -- a...

Using Synthetic Evolution To Study The Brain: Key Part Of Neurons Modeled On Computer

The human brain has evolved over millions of years to become a vast network of billions of neurons and synaptic connections. Understanding it is one of humankind's greatest pursuits. But to understand how the brain processes information, researchers must first understand the very basics of neurons -- even down to how proteins inside the neurons act to change the neuron's voltage. To do so requires...

Using synthetic evolution to study the brain: Researchers model key part of neurons

The human brain has evolved over millions of years to become a vast network of billions of neurons and synaptic connections. Understanding it is one of humankind's greatest pursuits. But to understand how the brain processes information, researchers must first understand the very basics of neurons -- even down to how proteins inside the neurons act to change the neuron's voltage. To do so requires...

Where religious belief and disbelief meet

While the human brain responds very differently to religious and nonreligious propositions, the process of believing or disbelieving a statement, whether religious or not, seems to be governed by the same areas in the brain.

Where's The Science? The Sorry State Of Psychotherapy

The prevalence of mental health disorders in this country has nearly doubled in the past 20 years. Who is treating all of these patients? Clinical psychologists and therapists are charged with the task, but many are falling short by using methods that are out of date and lack scientific rigor, according to a new...

Where's the science? The sorry state of psychotherapy

The prevalence of mental health disorders in this country has nearly doubled in the past 20 years. Who is treating all of these patients? Clinical psychologists and therapists are charged with the task, but many are falling short by using methods that are out of date and lack scientific rigor.

Women's soccer -- get fit while having fun

New research shows that women benefit more from playing recreational soccer than from running when it comes to overall fitness. And that's not all -- women playing soccer experience a higher degree of motivation when it comes to sticking to their sport, and they increase their ability to bridge and create new acquaintances. Download fotos and video from our website

An animated penguin boosts kids' math scores

California's hottest new math teacher is an animated penguin named JiJi. Yes, it's true. A mute, waddling, tuxedo-clad cartoon figure has been quietly taking over math programs dotting Silicon Valley, dramatically improving test scores in mostly low-performing schools.

Keeping hepatitis C virus at bay after a liver transplant

One of the most common reasons for needing a liver transplant is liver failure or liver cancer caused by liver cell infection with hepatitis C virus (HCV). However, in nearly all patients the new liver becomes infected with HCV almost immediately. But now, Hideki Ohdan, Kazuaki Chayama, and colleagues, at Hiroshima University, Japan, have developed an approach that transiently keeps HCV levels...