808,589 articles

Oracle 1Q Profit Up 25 Percent

(AP) -- Business software maker Oracle Corp. overcame the recent economic turbulence that raised recession anxieties to deliver a fiscal first-quarter performance that topped analyst expectations.

Scientists launch deep-sea scientific drilling program to study volatile earthquake zone

Today, the Nankai Trough Seismogenic Zone Experiment (NanTroSEIZE) gets underway, with the Japanese drilling vessel Chikyu departing from Shingu Port with scientists aboard, all ready to log, drill, sample, and install monitoring instrumentation in one of the most active earthquake zones on Earth. The vessel's launch starts the first of a series of scientific drilling expeditions that will...

Mystery Boy in Iron Coffin Identified

(AP) -- Researchers have solved the mystery of the boy in the iron coffin. The cast-iron coffin was discovered by utility workers in Washington two years ago. Smithsonian scientists led by forensic anthropologist Doug Owsley set about trying to determine who was buried in it, so the body could be placed in a new, properly marked grave.

SEC Subpoenas Jobs in Stock Options Case

(AP) -- Apple Inc. CEO Steve Jobs has been subpoenaed by the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission to give a deposition in a stock-options backdating case against Apple's former general counsel, a person familiar with the case told The Associated Press Thursday.


THURSDAY 20. SEPTEMBER 2007


Rockets to Roar at Air and Space Expo (SPACE.com)

SPACE.com - GOLDEN, Colorado – This year's Wirefly X Prize Cup is shaping up to become a unique rocket festival that salutes forward-looking technology, space exploration and education, while showcasing a contest between private sector lunar lander vehicle designs.

Sperm ban means some in short supply (AP)

AP - For American parents looking for donor sperm to produce blond, blue-eyed Scandinavian babies, the search just got a little trickier. A ban on sperm from all European countries with exposure to mad cow disease means U.S. sperm banks are running low.

Mystery boy in iron coffin identified (AP)

AP - Researchers have solved the mystery of the boy in the iron coffin. The cast-iron coffin was discovered by utility workers in Washington two years ago. Smithsonian scientists led by forensic anthropologist Doug Owsley set about trying to determine who was buried in it, so the body could be placed in a new, properly marked...

Antibiotic Resistance: Drug Resistance Gene Has Spread From East Coast To Midwest Bacteria

A resistance gene that allows bacteria to beat an important class of antibiotics has started to appear in microorganisms taken from Midwestern patients, according to researchers. Less than a decade ago, scientists first noticed the BlaKPC gene in bacteria taken from East Coast patients. Bacteria with an active copy of the gene can defeat carbapenems, antibiotics reserved for use in the most...

Brain's Messengers Could Be Regulated, Study Suggests

Tiny, spontaneous releases of the brain's primary chemical messengers can be regulated, potentially giving scientists unprecedented control over how the brain is wired. The work could lead to a better understanding of neurological diseases like schizophrenia. Sputtering electrical activity -- like a firecracker's leftover sparks after a big bang -- was long considered inconsequential background...

Increased Bering Sea Ice Explains Prehistoric Fur Seal Rookeries

The Bering Sea provides critical habitat for many species of marine mammals, including seals, sea lions and whales. The predictable formation and movement of sea ice is a defining feature of this habitat, although new evidence suggests that only a few thousand years ago, during a period of cold climate known as the "Neoglacial," much more ice filled the Bering Sea and stayed around longer.

Intriguing Structures On The Surface Of Fat Cells

The surface of fat cells contains many small pockets called caveolae (because they look like caves in an electron microscope). Although their role is not clear, Paul F. Pilch and colleagues review current knowledge about caveolae and conclude that one of their major functions is to regulate the movement and production of fats in fat cells. Caveolae may also help the hormone insulin bind to fat...

Structure Of Enzyme In Unusual Virus Identified

Biologists have determined the three-dimensional structure of an unusual viral enzyme that is required in the assembly of new viruses. Learning the fundamental mechanisms for how this process works may later enable scientists to develop drugs that inhibit certain viral infections, according to the researchers.

Velociraptor Had Feathers

Finding of quill knobs on fossilized velociraptor bone demonstrates that even large dinosaurs were feathered and may have descended from animals capable of flight. Scientists have known for years that many dinosaurs had feathers. Now the presence of feathers has been documented in velociraptor, one of the most iconic of dinosaurs and a close relative of birds.

Nasal surgery helps transsexuals

British scientists say transsexuals undergoing male-to-female gender reassignment report satisfaction with surgery to create a more feminine-appearing nose.

Smart insulin nanostructures pass feasibility test

Biomedical engineers at The University of Texas School of Health Information Sciences at Houston have announced pre-clinical test results in the September issue of the International Journal of Nanomedicine demonstrating the feasibility of a smart particle insulin release system that detects spikes in glucose or blood sugar levels and releases insulin to counteract them.

Toshiba to demonstrate prototype of new 'SpursEngine' processor

Toshiba Corporation today announced development of the "SpursEngine", a high-performance stream processor integrating Synergistic Processing Element (SPE) cores derived from the Cell Broadband Engine (Cell/B.E.). The SpursEngine is expressly designed to bring the powerful capabilities of the Cell/B.E. technology to consumer electronics, and to take video processing in digital consumer products to...