884,737 articles

More on mate tea: lower cholesterol and an international agreement

When a study in her lab showed that mate (mah` tā) tea drinkers had experienced a significant increase in the activity of an enzyme that promotes HDL (good) cholesterol while lowering LDL (bad) cholesterol, University of Illinois scientist Elvira de Mejia headed for Argentina where mate tea has been grown and taken medicinally for centuries.

MRI predicts liver fibrosis, study says

Moderate to severe chronic liver disease can be predicted with the use of diffusion-weighted MRI (DWI), according to a recent study conducted by researchers at New York University Medical Center in New York, NY.

New light trap captures larval stage of new species; DNA barcode technology used

When David Jones, a fisheries oceanographer at the Cooperative Institute for Marine and Atmospheric Studies (CIMAS) located at the University of Miami`s Rosenstiel School, set out to design a better light trap to collect young reef fishes, he never imagined his invention would contribute to the discovery of a new species. But, after finding a goby that didn`t quite fit any known description, his...

Playing social-intelligence game reduces stress hormone by 17 percent

A video game designed by McGill University researchers to help train people to change their perception of social threats and boost their self-confidence has now been shown to reduce the production of the stress-related hormone cortisol. The new findings appear in the October issue of the American Psychological Association`s Journal of Personality and Social Psychology.

Quantitative PET imaging finds early determination of effectiveness of cancer treatment

With positron emission tomography (PET) imaging, seeing is believing: Evaluating a patient`s response to chemotherapy for non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) typically involves visual interpretation of scans of cancer tumors. Researchers have found that measuring a quantitative index—one that reflects the reduction of metabolic activity after chemotherapy first begins—adds accurate information about...

Religion and healthcare should mix, study says

Research shows that religion and spirituality are linked to positive physical and mental health; however, most studies have focused on people with life threatening diseases. A new study from the University of Missouri-Columbia shows that religion helps many individuals with disabilities adjust to their impairments and gives new meaning to their lives.

Solar telescope reaches 120,000 feet on jumbo-jet-sized balloon

In a landmark test flight, the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) and a team of research partners this month successfully launched a solar telescope to an altitude of 120,000 feet, borne by a balloon larger than a Boeing 747 jumbo jet. The test clears the way for long-duration polar balloon flights beginning in 2009 that will capture unprecedented details of the Sun's surface.

Stellar forensics with striking new image from Chandra

A spectacular new image shows how complex a star`s afterlife can be. By studying the details of this image made from a long observation by NASA`s Chandra X-ray Observatory, astronomers can better understand how some stars die and disperse elements like oxygen into the next generation of stars and planets.

Uranium isotope ratios are not invariant, researchers show

For years, the ratio of uranium`s two long-lived isotopes, U-235 and U-238, has been considered invariant, despite measurements made in the mid-1970s that hinted otherwise. Now, with improved precision from state-of-the-art instrumentation, researchers at the University of Illinois unequivocally show this ratio actually does vary significantly in Earth materials.

Microsoft To Abide by EU Antitrust Rules

Microsoft said it will fully comply with all of its obligations under the European Commission's landmark 2004 antitrust decision, which was upheld by the European Union's Court of First Instance last month. The software giant indicated it will not attempt to further dispute the matter before the European Court of Justice. European Commissioner Neelie Kroes said the onus is now on Microsoft to...

Cisco to Buy Navini for $330 Million

(AP) -- Cisco Systems Inc. is snapping up privately held Navini Networks Inc. for $330 million, extending the networking equipment maker's acquisition streak and providing the latest validation for the new wireless network technology called WiMax.

NASA Finds Ice on Shuttle Plumbing

(AP) -- With just two hours remaining before liftoff, NASA reported Tuesday that a chunk of ice had formed on the plumbing for space shuttle Discovery's fuel tank and debated how much of a hazard it might pose during launch.

Nuclear power worldwide: status and outlook

The IAEA makes two annual projections concerning the growth of nuclear power, a low and a high. The low projection assumes that all nuclear capacity that is currently under construction or firmly in the development pipeline gets completed and attached to the grid, but no other capacity is added. In this low projection, there would be growth in capacity from 370 GW(e) at the end of 2006 to 447...

Platinum-rich shell, platinum-poor core

Hydrogen fuel cells will power the automobiles of the future; however, they have so far suffered from being insufficiently competitive. At the University of Houston, Texas, USA, a team led by Peter Strasser has now developed a new class of electrocatalyst that could help to improve the capacity of fuel cells. The active phase of the catalyst consists of nanoparticles with a platinum-rich shell and...

Researchers Uncover Physics of Coiling Ropes

When a mountain climber drops a rope, it often forms a series of coils on the ground. Not only thick ropes, but also sewing thread and even cooked spaghetti behave in a similar way. Recently, scientists have carried out the first controlled laboratory experiments on the peculiar phenomenon of coiling ropes, revealing the surprising dynamics behind it.

Space Shuttle Discovery Blasts Off

(AP) -- Space shuttle Discovery and a crew of seven rocketed away Tuesday in pursuit of the international space station, where a formidable construction job awaits them.

Wide income gap linked to deaths in both rich and poor nations

A wide income gap between the most affluent and the worst off in society is closely associated with higher death rates worldwide, especially for younger adults, finds a study published on bmj.com today as part of a global theme issue on poverty and human development.