749,206 articles

COVID-19: Immune system derails

Contrary to what has been generally assumed so far, a severe course of COVID-19 does not solely result in a strong immune reaction - rather, the immune response is caught in a continuous loop of activation and inhibition. Experts from Charité - Universitätsmedizin Berlin, the University of Bonn, the German Center for Neurodegenerative Diseases (DZNE), the Helmholtz Centre for Infection...

Flexible management of hydropower plants would contribute to a secure electricity supply

UPV/EHU and BC3 researchers have analyzed the expected evolution of power supply and demand over the coming decades in Spain; they consider a future without nuclear and coal-based plants but with a greater share of renewable sources. They simulate security of supply in this scenario and evaluate to what extent hydro stations could help to alleviate the risk of a power supply shortage.

Fuel from disused tyres

The journal Renewable and Sustainable Energy Reviews has published a study by the UPV/EHU's Department of Chemical Engineering, which describes the work relating to the catalytic pyrolysis of tyres to see which products can be obtained in this process and their possible applications as fuel.

Genes related to down syndrome abnormalities may protect against solid tumors

Scientists from Stanley Manne Children's Research Institute at Ann & Robert H. Lurie Children's Hospital of Chicago discovered that a set of genes with decreased expression in individuals with Down syndrome may lead to clinical abnormalities in this population, such as poor muscle development and heart valve problems. Impairment in these same genes may also protect people with Down syndrome from...

Impact of climate change on tropical fisheries would create ripples across the world

Seafood is the most highly traded food commodity globally, with tropical zone marine fisheries contributing more than 50% of the global fish catch, an average of $USD 96 billion annually. Available scientific evidence consistently shows that tropical marine habitats, fish stocks and fisheries are most vulnerable to oceanic changes associated with climate change. However, telecoupling, or linkages...

New CT scanning method may improve heart massage

As part of an international collaboration, researchers from Aarhus University, Denmark, and University of Leicester, UK, have succeeded in developing a dynamic 3D CT scanning method that shows what happens inside the body during simulated heart massage. The method could help to increase the chance of surviving a cardiac arrest.

Non-invasive nerve stimulation boosts learning of foreign language sounds

New research by neuroscientists at the University of Pittsburgh and UC San Francisco (UCSF) revealed that a simple, earbud-like device developed at UCSF that imperceptibly stimulates the brain could significantly improve the wearer's ability to learn the sounds of a new language. This device may have wide-ranging applications for boosting other kinds of learning as well.

NTU develops peptide that makes drug-resistant bacteria sensitive to antibiotics again

Scientists at NTU Singapore have developed a synthetic peptide that can make multidrug-resistant bacteria sensitive to antibiotics again when used together with traditional antibiotics, offering hope for the prospect of a combination treatment strategy to tackle certain antibiotic-tolerant infections. On its own, the synthetic antimicrobial peptide can also kill bacteria that have grown resistant...

Small towns have highest risk of intimate partner violence

Despite common perceptions that big cities have more violence, women living in small towns are most at risk of violence from current or former partners. The study analyzed the responses of more than 570,000 women from the National Crime Victimization Survey from 1994-2015. Women from small towns were 27% more likely to be victims of intimate partner violence than women from the center of big...

Spintronics: Researchers show how to make non-magnetic materials magnetic

A complex process can modify non-magnetic oxide materials in such a way to make them magnetic. The basis for this new phenomenon is controlled layer-by-layer growth of each material. An international research team with researchers from Martin Luther University Halle-Wittenberg (MLU) reported on their unexpected findings in the journal "Nature Communications".

Coronavirus live news: WHO surge team arrives in South Africa as global deaths top 700,000

Florida tops 500,000 cases; Spain sees highest daily post-lockdown infections; Italy threatens to ban Ryanair. Follow the latest updates WHO surge team arrives in South AfricaGlobal deaths pass 700,000Facebook removes Trump post for spreading false information on CovidFrance ‘could lose control of Covid-19 at any time’See all our coronavirus coverage 2.04am BST In Australia, the New South...


WEDNESDAY 5. AUGUST 2020