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225,431 articles from PhysOrg

Astronomers discover how to feed a black hole

The black holes at the centers of galaxies are the most mysterious objects in the Universe, not only because of the huge quantities of material within them, millions of times the mass of the sun, but because of the incredibly dense concentration of matter in a volume no bigger than that of our solar system. When they capture matter from their surroundings they become active, and can send out...

Filming the thermal death of electrons in matter

It is well known that an electric current increases the temperature of the material through which it is conducted due to the so-called Joule effect. This effect, which is used daily in domestic and industrial heaters, hair dryers, thermal fuses, etc., occurs because the new electrons injected into the material cannot go to the lower energy states because those are already occupied by the electrons...

Permafrost in Daisetsu Mountains in Japan projected to decrease significantly

Areas with ground temperatures that remain below 0 degrees Celsius for more than two years are referred to as permafrost, and approximately one-quarter of the Northern Hemisphere and 17% of the Earth's exposed land surface is permafrost. Permafrost is found in mountainous areas as well as in high-latitude tundra and taiga regions. Recent observations have shown that the permafrost in mountainous...

New polymer composite for electromagnetic shielding applications

scientists from NUST MISIS, South Ural State University and Joint Institute for Nuclear Research together with colleagues from Egypt, Saudi Arabia and Belarus have developed a new radar absorbing polymer composite with exfoliated graphite (EG)/barium aluminum hexaferrite (HF) fillers. The new composite has excellent magnetic and microwave properties. It can absorb 99.9% of the incoming...

Remains of ancient dogs found among early human ancestral remains in Georgia

A team of researchers from Italy, Spain and Georgia has found the remains of ancient hunting dogs at a dig site in what is now modern Georgia. In their paper published in the journal Scientific Reports, the group describes the fossils they found, their attempts to classify them and the possibility of the dogs interacting with early human ancestors.

The magnetic field in the galactic outflow of M82

Messier 82 (M82) is a luminous infrared galaxy about twelve million light-years away from the Milky Way. Its burst of star formation powers the radiation and drives a bipolar superwind that originates near the core of the galaxy. The wind extends perpendicular to the galactic plane out into the halo and intergalactic medium; ionized gas in the wind traces a continuous structure that is about...

Plant reproduction: Unraveling the role of a new membrane within pollen grain

While the reproduction process of flowering plants has been known for more than 120 years, there still remain many mysteries to unravel. Researchers from INRAE, ENS de Lyon, CNRS and Limagrain characterized a new membrane within pollen grain that surrounds the two sperm cells. In a publication in Journal of Cell Biology on 29 July 2021, the scientists show that this membrane is key to guarantee...

Apollo 11 ascent stage may still be orbiting the moon

James Meador, an independent researcher at the California Institute of Technology, has found evidence that suggests the Apollo 11 ascent stage may still be orbiting the moon. He has written a paper outlining his research and findings and has posted it on the arXiv preprint server.

Intentional cracks and wrinkles provide low-cost option for medical screening

Size matters when it comes to sorting biological materials. From identifying pathogens to screening for drug treatments, the ability to quickly identify and separate particles based on their size is an increasingly important tool in diagnosing and treating patients, according to Huanyu "Larry" Cheng, Dorothy Quiggle Career Development Professor in Penn State's Department of Engineering Science and...

New economic dashboard could serve as early warning system for state-level recessions, other economic shocks

The spread of COVID-19 was rapid and relentless, and so were its effects on economies worldwide. Knowing how state economies withstand economic shocks in near-real time can be beneficial for policymakers who have the power to enact strategies to counteract the negative impact. University of Notre Dame researchers developed the first near-real-time dashboard that tracks weekly state-level economic...

Mapping of genetic control elements in the cerebellum

The mammalian cerebellum has long been associated almost exclusively with motor control, yet recent studies indicate that it also contributes to many higher brain functions. An international research team led by Prof. Dr. Henrik Kaessmann from the Center for Molecular Biology of Heidelberg University (ZMBH) has now decoded the genetic programs that control the development of cerebellar cell types...

Lipid polymer enables safe delivery of RNA drugs to the lungs

Hokkaido University researchers in Japan created and tested a library of lipid-based compounds to find a way to safely and effectively deliver RNA drugs to the lungs. Their analyses, published in the journal Materials Horizons, pinpointed a lipid polymer that might in the future be used to treat acute respiratory distress syndrome, pulmonary hypertension and lung cancers.

Ultracold transistors serve as their own memory devices

Digital transistors—assembled by the billions in today's computer chips—act as near-perfect electronic switches. In the "on" position, achieved when an above-threshold voltage is applied to the device, the transistor allows current to flow. When the switch is off, the transistor prevents the flow of current. The on/off positions of the switch translate into the 1s and 0s of digital...

Searching for dark matter inside the Earth

Dark matter remains one of the greatest mysteries in science. Despite decades of astronomical evidence for its existence, no one has yet been able to find any sign of it closer to home. There have been dozens of efforts to do so, and one of the most prominent just hit a milestone—the release and analysis of eight years of data. The IceCube Neutrino Observatory will soon be releasing results...

Red tide appearing in Gulf of Mexico

Red Tide is sweeping through much of the Gulf Coast of Florida, having killed millions of fish and other marine life, and it could be headed toward Texas, according to a Texas A&M University at Galveston marine biologist.

Engineers bend light to enhance wavelength conversion

Electrical engineers from the UCLA Samueli School of Engineering have developed a more efficient way of converting light from one wavelength to another, opening the door for improvements in the performance of imaging, sensing and communication systems.