732,569 articles

Scientists discover why some birds live fast and die young

Size, safety and parenting all have an impact on how quickly a species of bird matures, according to new research from the University of Sheffield that could help scientists to understand and predict how animals will respond to climate breakdown and the destruction of habitats.

UK coronavirus live: minister admits more testing capacity needed for care homes

Health minister Edward Argar concedes government still needs to ‘make available’ Covid-19 testing capacity so all care home residents Coronavirus latest: at a glanceGlobal coronavirus updates - liveFull coverage of the coronavirus outbreak 9.57am BST Transport for London says there were 10% more Tube journeys made between 5am and 6am this morning than the same period last week, although demand...

UK minister hails 'game-changing' coronavirus immunity test

Edward Argar says antibody test has been approved but none have been purchased yet Coronavirus – latest updatesSee all our coronavirus coverageA health minister has hailed the UK’s approval of an immunity test for coronavirus as a game changer that could allow more people to go to work with confidence, although the government has not yet managed to buy any of the tests.Edward Argar said the...

Coronavirus UK: latest deaths, confirmed cases – and which regions are hardest hit?

Latest figures from public health authorities on the spread of Covid-19 in the United Kingdom. Find out how many confirmed cases have been reported in each of England’s local authoritiesCoronavirus - live news updatesFind all our coronavirus coverage hereHow to protect yourself from infectionPlease note: these are government figures on numbers of confirmed cases - some people who report symptoms...

Waveguide array transports light without distortion

One of the challenges of optical microscopy is to continually increase the imaging power, or resolution. In the past three hundred odd years, scientists have been building ever-better microscopes. The limit, for a long time, was determined by only two factors: the contrast of the object being viewed, and the resolving power of the optics in the microscope. The last 50 years, in particular, have...

Solid-ion conductors for safer batteries

Lithium metal is one of the most promising candidates for next generation battery anodes due to its exceptionally high specific capacity. However, its widespread use is hindered by a challenging obstacle: upon multiple charge-discharge cycles, fractal filaments called dendrites can grow through the electrolyte from the negative to the positive electrode and short-circuit the battery from the...

Persistence of forages is dependent on harvest intervals

A successful forage program is one in which mass production is consistently high for a long period, and management practices are essential to reach this goal. In the northern United States, researchers commonly study alfalfa. Producers from the southern region are interested in growing alfalfa, yet they need more information to adequately manage this forage crop in their environment.

Humpback whales may risk collision with vessels in the Magellan Strait

Every summer (November-April), the Magellan Strait in the southwestern part of Chile becomes a popular feeding area for migrating humpback whales (Megaptera novaeangliae). The narrow strait is also a heavily used shipping route. A new study by scientists at the Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute (STRI) and collaborating institutions tracked and modelled the movement of individual whales in...

The microbe that protects mosquitos from malaria – podcast

Every year more than 200m new cases of malaria are reported. And despite the dramatic reduction in cases and deaths over the past two decades, novel treatments and prevention strategies are badly needed. Speaking to Dr Jeremy Herren in Nairobi, Kenya, Nicola Davis hears how a newly-discovered microbe might offer mosquitos protection from the parasite and in doing so, prevent its spread Continue...

China hacking poses 'significant threat' to US Covid-19 response, says FBI

Beijing dismisses as slander US claims that any organisation researching vaccines should assume they are a targetCoronavirus – latest updatesSee all our coronavirus coverageOrganisations conducting research into Covid-19 may be targeted by computer hackers linked to the Chinese government, according to the FBI and the Department of Homeland Security.Neither agency cited any specific examples,...

Coronavirus live news: Trump 'surprised' by Fauci's reopening warnings as WHO says Covid-19 may never go

Fauci’s comments ‘not acceptable’, says Trump; Moscow ascribed 60% of April coronavirus deaths to other causes; virus in every African country; follow the latest updatesEU bid to salvage summer with distancing in hotelsBrazil and Mexico record deadliest day from Covid-19‘10 days of battle’: Wuhan draws up plan to test 11m peopleAustralia coronavirus updates – liveCoronavirus latest: at...

Public Health England approves Roche test for coronavirus antibodies

The accurate Covid-19-specific test can be quickly processed using existing equipmentCoronavirus – latest updatesSee all our coronavirus coveragePublic Health England has approved an antibody test, made by the giant pharmaceutical company Roche, which may now be used to determine how much of the population has been infected by Covid-19.Antibody testing could be hugely useful as the country...

Italian doctors find link between Covid-19 and inflammatory disorder

The disorder has required some children to undergo life-saving treatment in intensive care units Coronavirus – latest updatesSee all our coronavirus coverageDoctors in Italy have reported the first clear evidence of a link between Covid-19 and a rare but serious inflammatory disorder that has required some children to undergo life-saving treatment in intensive care units.The mysterious condition...

Loud talking could leave coronavirus in the air for up to 14 minutes

The news: Thousands of droplets produced from the mouths of people who are talking loudly can stay in the air for between eight and 14 minutes before disappearing, according to a new study. The research, conducted by a team with the US National Institutes of Health and published in PNAS Wednesday, could have significant impact on our understanding of covid-19 transmission. What’s the point:...


WEDNESDAY 13. MAY 2020


Signs of fetal alcohol syndrome detected in womb

New images reveal the earliest impairments to nonhuman primate fetal brain development due to alcohol ingested by the mother, in a study involving rhesus macaques. Magnetic resonance imaging showed impairments to brain growth during the third trimester of pregnancy, even though the fetus was exposed to alcohol only during the first trimester.

Designing flexible and stretchable single crystal electronic systems

Researchers at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign in collaboration with a Purdue team have discovered that certain crystals are more flexible and stretchable compared to current materials used for electronic applications. These new materials could therefore be used for making sensors and in robotics.

Atomically thin magnets for next generation spin and quantum electronics

As our smartphones, laptops, and computers get smaller and faster, so do the transistors inside them that control the flow of electricity and store information. But traditional transistors can only shrink so much. Now, researchers at Stevens Institute of Technology have developed a new atomically thin magnetic semiconductor that will allow the development of new transistors that work in a...