1,806 articles from APRIL 2024

The experimental demonstration of a verifiable blind quantum computing protocol

Quantum computers, systems that process and store information leveraging quantum mechanical phenomena, could eventually outperform classical computers on numerous tasks. Among other things, these computers could allow researchers to tackle complex optimization problems, speed up drug discovery and better protect users against cyber-security threats.

Saturday Citations: Listening to bird dreams, securing qubits, imagining impossible billiards

It's Saturday, which means that in a universe where the arrow of time moves backward, people have to go to work tomorrow. In such a hypothetical universe, Garfield hates Fridays—tough to imagine. This week, we looked at several hundred breaking science developments, four of which I've highlighted here, including a new geoengineering study, a quantum infosec breakthrough, and listening in on the...

Physicists solve puzzle about ancient galaxy found by Webb telescope

Last September, the James Webb Space Telescope, or JWST, discovered JWST-ER1g, a massive ancient galaxy that formed when the universe was just a quarter of its current age. Surprisingly, an Einstein ring is associated with this galaxy. That's because JWST-ER1g acts as a lens and bends light from a distant source, which then appears as a ring—a phenomenon called strong gravitational lensing,...

‘Smell is really important for social communication’: how technology is ruining our senses

Scientists say an overreliance on sight and sound is having a detrimental effect on people’s wellbeing and that our devices should deliver a multisensory experience“Wait a minute, wait a minute. You ain’t heard nothing yet.” So went the first line of audible dialogue in a feature film, 1927’s The Jazz Singer. It was one of the first times that mass media had conveyed the sight and sound...

Study lists world's 'forever chemical' hotspots

Dangerous concentrations of long-lingering "forever chemicals" have been found in surface and groundwater worldwide, according to a study released Tuesday that showed Australia, the United States and Europe as hotspots.


FRIDAY 12. APRIL 2024


Hiring ban disrupts research at Florida universities

When Zhengfei Guan, an agricultural economist at the University of Florida (UF), advertised for a new postdoc last summer, one applicant from China quickly rose to the top of the pile. But after being offered the job, the young scholar decided he didn’t want to work in Florida. His change of heart was triggered by a new Florida law prohibiting the state’s 12...

Theories that explain the crisis in democracy are inadequate for Latin America, experts say

The theories offered by the dominant literature in political science today to try to explain the sources of the political polarization that has endangered democracy around the world are adequate for the United States and Europe, but do not make sense for the countries of Latin America. For this reason, greater collaboration among political scientists is needed to identify other, more plausible...