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36,241 articles from Guardian Unlimited Science

Eat plants, try pilates and stay positive: how to keep your body younger than your years

Do blueberries make you live longer? Is pilates proper exercise? How do you avoid loneliness? Botox, yes or no? Here’s how to age betterWho doesn’t want a long and healthy life? Ageing may be non negotiable but how you do it affords some wiggle room. There is, however, no time to lose. Ideally you’d have been getting your health in order before middle age. But it’s never too late to start....

Monkeypox outbreak could be just ‘the peak of the iceberg’, WHO warns

Pandemic preparedness chief Sylvie Briand says ‘unusual’ spread of virus can be easily contained with the right measuresThe World Health Organization has warned that 200 monkeypox cases found in recent weeks outside countries where the virus usually circulates could be just the beginning.“We don’t know if we are just seeing the peak of the iceberg [or] if there are many more cases that are...


FRIDAY 27. MAY 2022


Maths doesn’t need a rebrand. We should celebrate its diversity and complexity | Letter

Prof Ulrike Tillmann on Andy Haldane’s suggestion that maths could be rebranded as numeracy to make it more approachableI read with interest your article in response to Andy Haldane’s comments suggesting maths could be rebranded as numeracy (Pass notes, 18 May). I welcome Mr Haldane’s support for the mathematical sciences and appreciate his intent to make the subject approachable to all....

Monkeypox patients advised to avoid contact with pets for three weeks

UK experts urge confirmed cases to avoid handling household pets as precautionary measurePeople with monkeypox have been told to avoid contact with their pets for three weeks amid concerns the animals could become infected and pass the virus on to other people.Monkeypox is caused by a viral infection and can be found in animals including rodents and monkeys, as well as in humans. It is typically...

Britain is paving the way for gene-edited food – will the public stomach it?

Twenty years ago, the anti-GM movement had wide backing. Experts say the current mood on gene editing is softerAt the height of the anti-GM movement, in 1999, the then head of Greenpeace UK, Peter Melchett, was charged with theft and criminal damage after scything down a field of genetically modified maize.In a decisive victory for the anti-GM movement, Lord Melchett and 27 fellow activists were...

Bionic reading: could an ADHD-friendly hack turn me into a speed-reader? | Daniel Lavelle

This typographical trick certainly helps me focus. But maybe having a wandering mind isn’t such a bad thingWith ADHD, thoughts and impulses intrude on my focus like burglars trying to break into a house. Sometimes these crooks carefully pick the backdoor lock before they silently enter and pilfer all the silverware. At other times, stealth goes out of the window; they’re kicking through the...


THURSDAY 26. MAY 2022


Pompeii victim’s genome successfully sequenced for first time

Scientists say man shares similarities with modern Italians and others who lived in region during Roman empireThe genome of a victim of the catastrophic eruption of Mount Vesuvius over the ancient city of Pompeii has been sequenced for the first time, scientists have revealed, shedding new light on the health and diversity of those who lived in the Roman empire at the time of the disaster.In a...

Save your breath: traditional Kyrgyz dance helps ease chronic lung disease

Exercise to help COPD hospital patients is being rolled out across Kyrgyzstan and to neighbouring countriesPhotographs by Danil UsmanovEvery day on the respiratory ward at one of Kyrgyzstan’s biggest hospitals, Aidai Temiraly Kyzy, a 24-year-old nurse, puts on the music and leads her patients in the Kara Jorgo, the national dance of the central Asian country.This involves a range of body...

Made to measure: why we can’t stop quantifying our lives

From ancient Egyptian cubits to fitness tracker apps, humankind has long been seeking ever more ways to measure the world – and ourselves. But what is this doing to us?If anything exemplifies the power of measurement in contemporary life, it is Standard Reference Peanut Butter. It’s the creation of the US National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) and sold to industry at a price of...

What should we do about monkeypox?

The sudden surge of monkeypox cases outside Africa has alarmed public health authorities around the world. In Europe and North America it’s the first time community transmission has been recorded among people with no links to west or central Africa. So what is happening?Ian Sample talks to virologist Oyewale Tomori about why monkeypox is flaring up, whether we should fear it, and what we can...


WEDNESDAY 25. MAY 2022


Monkeypox may have been circulating in UK for years, scientists say

UK confirmed cases in outbreak rise to 78, and experts say virus may have been spreading unseen for some timePublic health officials have confirmed seven more cases of monkeypox in England, bringing the UK total to 78, as scientists said the virus may have been circulating unseen for several years.The sudden surge in monkeypox, which is usually found in west and central Africa, has been recorded...

Scientists identify ‘trigger molecule’ for Covid-related changes to smell

Molecule found in coffee typically described by people with parosmia as disgusting or repulsiveScientists have identified the “trigger molecule” that makes pleasant aromas smell like burning rubbish or sewage in people whose sense of smell is disrupted by Covid.The loss of smell is a defining symptom of Covid-19, with about 18% of adults in the UK estimated to have been affected. Some people...

Click, clack and pop: sounds indicate health of coral reefs, study finds

Monitoring the planet’s ailing coral is costly and arduous. Now new research shows that scientists can do it by listening inThe popping sound, like milk hitting puffed rice cereal, that you hear when putting your head underwater is not your ear adjusting to a different atmosphere – it is the sound of the submarine world. Fish chat to each other, or move water with their fins; hard-shelled...

Therapy v medication? How to choose the best treatment for anxiety

Medication is often prescribed as a quick-fix but therapy can be more helpful in the long-run, if accessible. Here’s how to work out what is best for youSince the beginning of the pandemic, there has been a soaring demand for mental health services, with an estimated 1.6 million people in England waiting for specialised support, and another 8 million who would benefit but whose deterioration in...

Women in England with breast cancer may qualify for drug that buys ‘precious’ time

Nice approves Keytruda, which with chemotherapy can lengthen survival of women with triple negative breast cancerWomen with advanced breast cancer in England will be able to benefit from a new type of immunotherapy on the NHS after a U-turn by the medicines watchdog.The National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (Nice) has overturned its draft rejection of Keytruda (pembrolizumab) and said...

Terrawatch: is Earth’s core going rusty?

Rusty bits on Earth’s core could explain how the atmosphere became oxygenatedWhether it is your bike or a garden fork that you forgot to put away, most of us are familiar with the rapid rusting that happens when iron-containing objects are exposed to the elements.But it isn’t just iron left out in the rain that is vulnerable: research suggests Earth’s biggest deposit of iron – its core –...

AstraZeneca reviews diversity in trials to ensure drugs work for all

Firm aims to apply ‘equity lens’ across clinical tests to ensure diverse population groups take partThe pharmaceutical giant AstraZeneca is conducting a major review of diversity across its trials in an attempt to ensure its medicines work for all population groups, although it has admitted that including pregnant women is a particular challenge.The head of oncology at Britain’s biggest...

Monkeypox isn’t the disease we should be worried about | John Vidal

Climate change is likely to exacerbate the rapid spread of viruses and pathogens as humans encroach on the natural worldIn the past three weeks there have been nearly 100 cases and 18 human deaths from a rare tick-borne disease in Iraq; a fourth case of the Ebola virus and more than 100 cases of bubonic plague have been found in the Democratic Republic of Congo; and just two years after Africa was...

Gene editing could increase food security, UK adviser says

Legislation introduced in Lords aims to help speed up development of gene-edited productsGene editing could drastically increase global food security and reduce reliance on chemical fertilisers and pesticides in the coming decade, a scientific adviser to the UK government’s environment department has said.Speaking before the introduction of a bill on genetic technologies to the House of Lords on...

Monkeypox outbreak was waiting to happen, say scientists

Proportion of people protected has fallen substantially in decades since smallpox vaccination endedThe unprecedented surge in monkeypox cases in the UK and beyond was an outbreak waiting to happen after the end of global smallpox vaccination more than 40 years ago, scientists say.The UK Health Security Agency announced a further 14 cases in England on Tuesday, bringing the total to 70, and one...


TUESDAY 24. MAY 2022


Tuesday briefing: Everything you need to know about monkeypox

In today’s newsletter: rising cases of an infectious disease will naturally cause alarm – but Guardian science editor Ian Sample tells Nimo Omer why we shouldn’t be too concernedSign up here for our new daily newsletter, First EditionGood morning. As the seemingly never-ending fiasco of Partygate rumbles on (new pictures, that were obtained by ITV News, appear to show the prime minister...

Couch potatoes at higher risk of coronary heart disease, study finds

About 11% of cases could be prevented if people cut TV watching from two or more hours to less than an hour a dayMore than one in 10 cases of coronary heart disease could be prevented if people reduced their TV viewing to less than an hour a day, research suggests.Coronary heart disease occurs when fatty material builds up inside the coronary arteries causing them to narrow, reducing the heart’s...

What will the cost of living crisis do to our health?

Millions around the world are struggling with higher food and energy prices. In the UK inflation has reached a 40-year high of 9% in the 12 months to April, leaving many struggling to pay bills and shoulder normal living costs. When the weekly shop gets smaller and the flat gets colder, it’s our health that suffers.Madeleine Finlay speaks to health inequity expert Prof Michael Marmot about the...


MONDAY 23. MAY 2022


Scientists create tomatoes genetically edited to bolster vitamin D levels

The tomatoes contain as much provitamin D3 as two eggs, with UK outdoor field trials starting next monthScientists have created genetically edited tomatoes, each containing as much provitamin D3 – the precursor to vitamin D – as two eggs or a tablespoon of tuna. Outdoor field trials of the tomatoes are expected to begin in the UK next month, and if successful, could provide an important new...

Covid can cause ongoing damage to heart, lungs and kidneys, study finds

One in eight Covid hospital patients have heart inflammation up to two months later, researchers findDamage to the body’s organs including the lungs and kidneys is common in people who were admitted to hospital with Covid, with one in eight found to have heart inflammation, researchers have revealed.As the pandemic evolved, it became clear that some people who had Covid were being left with...