feed info

39,940 articles from Guardian Unlimited Science

Scientist fed classified information to China, says Canada intelligence report

Report says Xiangguo Qiu secretly worked with Wuhan Institute for Virology and posed a ‘threat to Canada’s economic security’A leading research scientist at Canada’s highest-security laboratory provided confidential scientific information to Chinese institutions, met secretly with officials and posed “a realistic and credible threat to Canada’s economic security” according to newly...

Study offers hope in identifying high-risk prostate cancer patients

Researchers find way to classify prostate cancer that might help identify 15% of men with more aggressive typeThe most common type of prostate cancer has two distinct ways of developing in the body, researchers have found, opening up new possibilities for identifying which patients need treatment.Prostate cancer is the most common form of cancer in men, with one in eight diagnosed with the disease...

Prologue: the collision – podcast

The beginning of a new series that explores seven stories and the thread that ties them together: artificial intelligence. In this prologue, Hannah (not her real name) has met Noah and he has changed her life for the better. So why does she have concerns about him? Continue...

The debilitating impact of tinnitus, and how a new app could help – podcast

It’s thought that about 15% of us are affected by tinnitus, and despite its potentially debilitating impact on mental health and quality of life, there isn’t any cure for the condition. Madeleine Finlay speaks to John, who has used CBT techniques to learn to live well with his tinnitus, and Dr Lucy Handscomb, a tinnitus researcher who is involved in trialling a new app that could hold promise...

First North Korea spy satellite is ‘alive’ and being controlled, experts say

Changes in orbit of Malligyong-1 suggest Pyongyang is successfully maneuvering the satelliteNorth Korea’s first spy satellite is “alive”, space experts have said, after detecting changes in its orbit that suggested Pyongyang was successfully controlling the spacecraft – although its capabilities remain unknown.After two fiery failures, North Korea successfully launched the Malligyong-1...

Ultra-processed food linked to 32 harmful effects to health, review finds

World’s largest review finds direct associations with higher risks of cancer, heart disease and early deathUltra-processed food (UPF) is directly linked to 32 harmful effects to health, including a higher risk of heart disease, cancer, type 2 diabetes, adverse mental health and early death, according to the world’s largest review of its kind.The findings from the first comprehensive umbrella...


WEDNESDAY 28. FEBRUARY 2024


Russia acknowledges continuing air leak from its segment of space station

Roscosmos admission follows Nasa comments that leak is growing but both agencies say there is no danger to ISS crewRussian space officials have acknowledged a continuing air leak from the Russian segment of the International Space Station, but said it poses no danger to its crew.The Roscosmos state corporation said that specialists were monitoring the leak and the crew “regularly conducts work...

‘Brain fog’ from long Covid has measurable impact, study suggests

Researchers found that deficits equivalent to six IQ points were detectable a year or more after infectionPeople experiencing long Covid have measurable memory and cognitive deficits equivalent to a difference of about six IQ points, a study suggests.The study, which assessed more than 140,000 people in summer 2022, revealed that Covid-19 may have an impact on cognitive and memory abilities that...

‘Plucky lander’: US spacecraft may reawaken after lunar night saps its power

Company that made Odysseus, which is carrying Nasa equipment, plan to resurrect lander once sunlight returns Odysseus, the first US-built spacecraft to land on the moon in more than 50 years, could outperform expectations and still be sending back crucial scientific data weeks beyond its initial planned seven- to 10-day period of operation, mission managers said on Wednesday.The lander, carrying...

Killer fungi detectives: inside the lab that may be fighting the next pandemic

Researchers in Adelaide are at the forefront of finding new fungal pathogens, which are spreading more because of climate change and can be deadly without effective drugsThe first tray of yellow-lidded specimen jars holds chunks of flesh – lung, perhaps, or muscle – some cerebrospinal fluid and another liquid, possibly from a brain abscess. The second holds a rainbow of colourful fungi,...

Man in remission from blood cancer and HIV after remarkable treatment

Paul Edmonds of California is fifth-known person in world confirmed to be in remission from both, says cancer instituteDoctors say a man in California who contracted blood cancer while living with HIV is in remission from both potentially fatal illnesses thanks to a treatment they are hailing as remarkable and encouraging.Paul Edmonds is only the fifth-known person in the world confirmed to be in...

The 280m-year-old fossil reptile that turned out to be a forgery

Modern imaging techniques reveal item thought to be well preserved lizard-like fossil is painted carvingGenerations of palaeontologists have marvelled over a 280m-year-old fossilised lizard-like reptile, Tridentinosaurus antiquus, discovered in the Italian Alps in 1931.Thought to be one of the best-preserved specimens of the species, palaeontologists believed there were even traces of carbonised...


TUESDAY 27. FEBRUARY 2024


One of world’s smallest fish found to make sounds that exceed 140 decibels – video

One of the world’s smallest fish, measuring about the width of an adult human fingernail, can make a sound as loud as a gunshot, scientists have found. The male Danionella cerebrum, a fish of about 12mm found in the streams of Myanmar, produces sounds that exceed 140 decibels, according to a study published in the PNAS journal, equivalent to an ambulance siren or a pneumatic drillOne of...

Microplastics found in every human placenta tested in study

Scientists express concern over health impacts, with another study finding particles in arteriesMicroplastics have been found in every human placenta tested in a study, leaving the researchers worried about the potential health impacts on developing foetuses.The scientists analysed 62 placental tissue samples and found the most common plastic detected was polyethylene, which is used to make...

One of world’s smallest fish found to make sound as loud as a gunshot

Scientists discover how Danionella cerebrum, measuring width of adult human fingernail, can create noises exceeding 140 decibelsOne of the world’s smallest fish, measuring about the width of an adult human fingernail, can make a sound as loud as a gunshot, scientists have said.The male Danionella cerebrum, a fish of about 12mm found in the streams of Myanmar, produces sounds that exceed 140...

‘Joyful madness’: ANU scientist wins global prize for ‘dancing his PhD’ about kangaroos

Four-minute video features drag queens, twerking, ballerinas, a classical Indian dancer and a bunch of friends from CanberraFollow our Australia news live blog for latest updatesGet our morning and afternoon news emails, free app or daily news podcastThe former Canberra scientist Dr Weliton Menário Costa said it “felt like winning Eurovision” when he learned he had won the global “Dance...

How green are electric cars? – podcast

Electric cars might seem like a no-brainer on a warming planet, but there are plenty of people who remain sceptical about everything from their battery life to their carbon impact and the environmental and human rights costs of their parts. Madeleine Finlay consults Auke Hoekstra, known as the internet’s ‘EV debunker in chief’, to unpick the myths, realities and grey areas surrounding...

Odysseus craft’s moon mission to be cut short after sideways landing

Intuitive Machines, private company behind lander, says mission will end after five days rather than the expected to seven to 10Flight control engineers expect to lose contact with the private US moon lander Odysseus on Tuesday, cutting short the mission five days after its sideways touchdown, the company behind the spacecraft, Intuitive Machines, said.It remained to be seen how much scientific...

UK trails other countries on waiting times for cancer treatment, study finds

Research compared access to radiotherapy and chemotherapy in Australia, Canada, Norway and UKCancer patients in the UK wait up to seven weeks longer to begin radiotherapy or chemotherapy than people in comparable countries, research has revealed.The stark findings are yet more damning evidence of the extent to which the UK lags behind other nations, as experts warn that people’s chances of...


MONDAY 26. FEBRUARY 2024


Astronomers spot white dwarf star with metallic ‘scar’

Patch on Earth-sized remnant of star covers larger fraction of pole than equivalent of Antarctica on EarthAstronomers have spotted a star with a dark metallic “scar” on its surface, thought to be the imprint of a doomed planetary fragment that came too close to its host.The white dwarf star, called WD 0816-310, is a dense, Earth-sized remnant of a star about 63 light years away that would have...

More women may be psychopaths than previously thought, says expert

Dr Clive Boddy says assessment skews towards obvious male traits but female psychopathy is more subtleWhen it comes to a typical psychopath, the suited and booted Patrick Bateman from the novel American Psycho might spring to mind, but, according to one expert, the number of women with the neuropsychiatric disorder could be far greater than previously thought.Psychopaths are generally considered...

Scientists confirm first cases of bird flu on mainland Antarctica

Fears for penguin colonies after the discovery of the highly contagious H5N1 virus in two dead skuasBird flu has reached mainland of Antarctica for the first time, officials have confirmed.The H5N1 virus was found on Friday in two dead scavenging birds called skuas near Primavera Base, the Argentinian scientific research station on the Antarctic peninsula. Continue...

Wendy Mitchell obituary

Writer and dementia campaigner who believed that people should have the right to choose their own deathThe writer-activist Wendy Mitchell, who has died aged 68, won hearts and minds advocating for living positively with dementia. She was determined to remind people that those living with the disease are not “sufferers” and that there is “a beginning, a middle and an end to the disease –...

I can’t picture things in my mind. I didn’t realize that was unusual

People with aphantasia can’t mentally visualize things. Mental imagery is a spectrum, and we lie outside it, in the darkI discovered I had aphantasia by accident. When you live your entire life without a “mind’s eye”, it seems completely normal to visualize nothing when remembering people and places, or imagining the future.Two years ago, I wrote an article about pupillometry, or the...

Japan’s moon lander survives two-week lunar night after wonky landing

Unmanned Slim spacecraft responds to signal from Earth after touching down at awkward angle in JanuaryJapan’s moon lander has responded to a signal from Earth, suggesting it survived the two-week lunar night, the country’s space agency has said.The unmanned Smart Lander for Investigating Moon (Slim) touched down last month at a wonky angle that left its solar panels facing the wrong way. But...