830,587 articles

When a chromosome is lost: How do human cells react to monosomy?

Human cells are usually diploid—they contain two sets of chromosome. Cells in which one chromosome is missing from the duplicated chromosome set are generally not viable. For a long time, the mechanisms responsible for the loss of viability were unknown. This is where researchers at the Technical University of Kaiserslautern (TUK) came in. In collaboration with the European Molecular Biology...

Tiny lasers acting together as one: Topological vertical cavity laser arrays

Israeli and German researchers have developed a way to force an array of vertical cavity lasers to act together as a single laser—a highly effective laser network the size of a grain of sand. The findings are presented in a new joint research paper published online by the prestigious journal Science on Friday, September 24.

Using dendrochronology to date old musical instruments

Dendrochronologists, Paolo Cherubini with the Swiss Federal Institute for Forest, Snow and Landscape Research, has published a Perspective piece in the journal Science outlining the use of dendrochronology to determine the approximate age of old wooden stringed instruments. In his paper, Cherubini notes that analysis of tree rings of some instruments can be used to determine the terminus post...

Immersion tank study will explore impact of space travel on the female body

Experiment aims to address a gender gap where most space medicine research has been carried out on menIt may sound like a prolonged spa break but when 20 women tuck themselves into a waterbed in the south of France for five days this week, it will be under the guise of a scientific study into the impact of space flight on the female body.The experiment, by the European Space Agency, will simulate...

Video: How lemur research can help endangered species

Research scientists Marina Blanco, Ph.D. and Lydia Greene, Ph.D. study lemurs at the Duke Lemur Center in Durham, North Carolina (home to the largest population of lemurs outside of Madagascar). Some people might assume that they do this just to hang out with these adorable primates all day, but the truth is that this research could be critical to the survival of some of the world's most...

Geological cold case may reveal critical minerals

Researchers on the hunt for why cold eclogites mysteriously disappeared from geological records during the early stages of the Earth's development may have found the answer, and with it clues that could help locate critical minerals today.

New research reveals credit rating agencies responded too slowly to COVID-19

The first study into the effect of COVID-19 on sovereign credit ratings found that rating agencies were slow to react to the pandemic's unprecedented economic and fiscal reverberations. The research raises questions about the timeliness and reliability of prominent creditworthiness measures, with potentially significant consequences for investors and for public debt and global financial stability.

Can sustainability standards effectively mitigate food system challenges?

While agrifood production is essential for feeding our growing global population, it can also contribute to environmental and social problems, including deforestation, biodiversity loss, poor or precarious labor conditions, and persistent poverty. Certification and standards can encourage use of sustainable production practices, but how effective are such programs in addressing food system...

Earth and Venus grew up as rambunctious planets

What doesn't stick comes around: Using machine learning and simulations of giant impacts, researchers at the Lunar and Planetary Laboratory found that the planets residing in the inner solar systems were likely born from repeated hit-and-run collisions, challenging conventional models of planet formation.

Sponges, blood cells and sound-art: the exhibition hoping to cure my cancer

The UK’s first ever cancer research exhibition pairs up patients with researchers to show the creative paths taken on the cutting edge of human discoveryShortly before the pandemic hit, I found myself dressed in a red lab coat, trying to find a cure for blood cancer. Although that might be overstating things a little. It’s Professor Dominique Bonnet who is at the cutting edge of cancer...

The US is about to kick-start its controversial covid booster campaign

The news: The White House is set to kick off its booster shot campaign today, after Centers for Disease Control and Prevention director Rochelle Walensky overruled her own agency’s advisors in favor of recommending third doses of the Pfizer-BioNTech vaccine for frontline workers. Who gets it: There are three groups of Americans now eligible for a booster shot: those 65 and older, some adults...

A Hunter-Gatherer’s Guide to the 21st Century review – sciencey self-help

Evolutionary biologists Heather Heying and Bret Weinstein show how human nature is at odds with modern society, in a study soaked in pseudoscienceImagine discovering a fence in the middle of a desert. Not immediately seeing its purpose, you might think: “Let’s get rid of this useless fence!” But are you sure about that? Maybe you’re at the edge of a field of angry wildebeest, and by...

Return of the common cold: infections surge in UK as autumn arrives

After 18 months of social distancing, scientists believe people’s immune defences have weakenedThe return of schools and the arrival of autumn means common colds and other respiratory infections are firmly on the rise, spreading coughs and sneezes, more severe illnesses, and prompting some to report their worst colds ever.According to Public Health England, there is no particularly nasty new...