824,911 articles

The Final 25%: How to tackle hard-to-reach emissions

Electricity, transport, and heating account for a massive 80% of greenhouse gas emissions and are at the forefront of the battle to achieve Net Zero. However, reaching Net Zero means also dealing with the hard-to-reach 20% of emissions: agriculture, plastics, cement, and waste, and extracting at least 5% extra from the atmosphere to account for the emissions that we simply cannot get rid of....

Coronavirus live news: Japan experts urge nationwide state of emergency as Sydney suffers worst pandemic day

Advisers to government in Tokyo say Covid surge requires harsher measures, while Australian state of NSW announces 262 new casesUS disputes WHO call to delay Covid booster shots to help poorer nationsFully vaccinated UK arrivals from France will not need to quarantineSydney Covid Delta variant outbreak ‘an epidemic of young people’ 6.03am BST Hello and welcome to our rolling coverage of the...

Are hair relaxers causing breast cancer in black women? – podcast

Research from the Black Women’s Health Study has found that long-term and frequent users of hair relaxers had roughly a 30% increased risk of breast cancer compared with more infrequent users. Shivani Dave speaks to Dr Kimberly Bertrand, co-investigator of the study and assistant professor of medicine at Boston University, about the research and to journalist Tayo Bero about the effects these...

Powering navigational buoys with help of ocean waves

Traditionally used energy harvesting technologies, like photovoltaic panels or wind turbines, suffer from several limitations. In the absence of daylight and wind, neither of the two can supply any power. In the case of ocean buoys, a potential solution is omnipresent: wave energy. Abundant, predictable, and consistent, the ocean's waves can be used to power navigation buoys. Researchers have...


WEDNESDAY 4. AUGUST 2021


Genetic secret to age women start menopause discovered

Research could lead to doctors being able to tell women how long they have got left to start a familyA series of genetic signals that influences the age women begin menopause has been identified, potentially paving the way to fertility treatment that could extend the natural reproductive lifespan of women.Researchers scanned the genes of more than 200,000 women and found nearly 300 genetic signals...

My favorite Martian image: Helicopter scouts ridge area for Perseverance

Ask any space explorer, and they'll have a favorite photo or two from their mission. For Kevin Hand, a scientist at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Southern California and co-lead of the Perseverance rover's first science campaign, his latest favorite is a 3D image of low-lying wrinkles in the surface of Jezero Crater. The science team calls this area "Raised Ridges." NASA's Ingenuity Mars...

Researchers around the world are buzzing about a candidate superconductor

Since receiving a $25 million grant in 2019 to become the first National Science Foundation (NSF) Quantum Foundry, UC Santa Barbara researchers affiliated with the foundry have been working to develop materials that can enable quantum information-based technologies for such applications as quantum computing, communications, sensing, and simulation.

Using graphene foam to filter toxins from drinking water

Some kinds of water pollution, such as algal blooms and plastics that foul rivers, lakes, and marine environments, lie in plain sight. But other contaminants are not so readily apparent, which makes their impact potentially more dangerous. Among these invisible substances is uranium. Leaching into water resources from mining operations, nuclear waste sites, or from natural subterranean deposits,...

Barriers to voting in elections linked to increased odds of being uninsured

Groups commonly targeted by voting restriction laws—those with low incomes, who are racial minorities, and who are young—are also less likely to be insured in states with more voting restrictions, according to a study by researchers at Columbia University Mailman School of Public Health and University of Alberta School of Public Health, Edmonton, Canada. However, those who are wealthier, white...

Increase in extreme precipitation in the northeast caused by Atlantic variability and climate change

Recent record-breaking rainfall across the northeastern United States is part of a larger trend. From Maine to West Virginia, the Northeast has seen an abrupt increase in extreme precipitation—heavy rain and snow resulting in about 1 to 2 inches of water in a day depending on location since 1996, which has coincided with warming sea surface temperatures in the North Atlantic. Northeast extreme...

Muscle protein that makes vertebrates more fit linked to limited lifespan

Researchers from Johns Hopkins Medicine say they have added to evidence that a protein called CaMKII improves strength, endurance, muscle health and fitness in young animals. Their experiments working with mice and fruit flies, however, found that the gene for CaMKII also contributes to an evolutionary tradeoff: increased susceptibility to age-associated diseases, frailty and mortality.

Common weight-loss drug successfully targets fat that can endanger heart health

Researchers have announced successful results of a clinical trial for a commonly prescribed weight-loss drug called liraglutide. In adults who are overweight or have obesity combined with high cardiovascular risk, once-daily liraglutide combined with lifestyle interventions significantly lowered two types of fat that have been associated with risk to heart health: visceral fat and ectopic fat.

Study reveals what triggers lung damage during COVID-19

Researchers found that a specific subtype of macrophages that originated from blood monocytes plays a key role in the hyper-inflammatory response in SARS-CoV-2 infected lungs, by performing single-cell RNA sequencing of bronchoalveolar lavage fluid cells. This study provides new insights for understanding dynamic changes in immune responses to COVID-19.