725,353 articles

How important is speech in transmitting coronavirus?

Normal speech by individuals who are asymptomatic but infected with coronavirus may produce enough aerosolized particles to transmit the infection, according to aerosol scientists. Although it's not yet known how important this is to the spread of COVID-19, it underscores the need for strict social distancing measures -- and for virologists, epidemiologists and engineers who study aerosols and...

New temperature sensing mechanism in plants

Cell biologists reveal the phytochrome B molecule has unexpected dynamics activated by temperature, and behaves differently depending on the temperature and type of light. As climate change warms the world, crop growth patterns and flowering times will change. A better understanding of how phytochromes regulate the seasonal rhythms of plant growth will help scientists develop crops for optimal...

What's Up - April 2020

What are some astronomy highlights in the sky in April 2020? This month, Venus visits the Pleiades; Mars, Jupiter and Saturn begin their breakup; and we ask, "What is the Moon illusion?" News Article Type: Homepage ArticlesPublished: Friday, April 3, 2020 -...

Unsustainable food systems: Can we reverse current trends?

As rural masses migrate to urban areas, populations grow, and people work toward better living standards, global food system sustainability is jeopardized, according to a new analysis spanning low- to high-income countries. The study, which was published April 3 in the scientific journal PLOS ONE, shows that only one major global driver—the increase in international trade flows—appears to have...

The Guardian view on immunity passports: an idea whose time has not come | Editorial

A phone app seems better than a passport as a way out of the lockdown. This system will need to be temporary, installed at users’ discretion and have privacy at its coreCoronavirus – latest updatesSee all our coronavirus coverageIf ministers think immunity passports or wristbands are the answer to resolving the immediate coronavirus crisis, they are asking the wrong question. Such a system, if...

Coronavirus deaths of two nurses lead to calls for more protection

One nurse in north London resigns after being prevented from wearing mask she bought herselfCoronavirus – latest updatesSee all our coronavirus coverageDemands for better protection for healthcare workers are growing following the death of two nurses in their 30s, while another frontline worker quit her job after being forbidden from wearing a face mask.Areema Nasreen, 36, died shortly after...

Removing the novel coronavirus from the water cycle

Researchers have called for more research to determine the best ways to keep SARS-CoV-19 out of the water cycle. They also suggest that developed nations should finance water treatment systems in the developing world to help prevent future COVID-19 pandemics.

More Covid-19 patients needed for drug trials, says Matt Hancock

Health secretary says trials are being set up with ‘breathtaking speed’ to find treatmentsCoronavirus – latest updatesSee all our coronavirus coverageMore patients with Covid-19 are needed to take part in clinical trials to find licensed drugs that could be effective in treating the virus, the health secretary has said, welcoming “the breathtaking speed” with which the experiments were...

A twist connecting magnetism and electronic-band topology

Materials that combine topological electronic properties and quantum magnetism are of high current interest, for the quantum many-body physics that can unfold in them and for possible applications in electronic components. For one such material, physicists have now established the microscopic mechanism linking magnetism and electronic-band topology.

Boris Johnson will be judged on the next four weeks. That prospect should frighten him | Jonathan Freedland

The British public are being patient over the coronavirus crisis, but they will not forgive governmental confusion for everBoris Johnson and his government are on probation, watched by a public whose mood could turn rapidly and brutally. For now, and on paper, Johnson has the people with him: his poll ratings have surged north of 50%, a feat last managed by a Tory government at the height of the...

Why has the UK lagged behind in testing for the coronavirus?

Britain has good expertise in diagnostics, but few firms with enough capacity to produceCoronavirus – latest updatesSee all our coronavirus coverage“Unlike some countries, we didn’t go into this crisis with a huge diagnostics industry. We have the best scientific labs in the world, but we did not have the scale,” Matt Hancock said this week, facing a barrage of questions on why the UK is...

US accused of 'modern piracy' after diversion of masks meant for Europe

German politician adds to chorus of complaints about American tactics to source protective gearCoronavirus – latest updatesSee all our coronavirus coverageThe US has been accused of “modern piracy” after reportedly diverting a shipment of masks intended for the German police, and outbidding other countries in the increasingly fraught global market for protective equipment.About 200,000 N95...

Treating COVID-19 in a patient with multiple myeloma

A case study of a patient in Wuhan, China, suggests that the immunosuppressant tocilizumab may be an effective COVID-19 treatment for very ill patients who also have multiple myeloma and other blood cancers. The report also suggests that blood cancer patients may have atypical COVID-19 symptoms.

COVID-19 pandemic may exacerbate childhood obesity

Public health scientists predict that school closures due to the COVID-19 pandemic will exacerbate the epidemic of childhood obesity in the United States. Researchers expect that COVID-19-related school closures will double out-of-school time this year for many children in the US and will exacerbate risk factors for weight gain associated with summer recess.

Despite what Matt Hancock says, the government's policy is still herd immunity | Anthony Costello

Tests alone are no good. We urgently need a community surveillance programme to stop the spread of Covid-19• Coronavirus latest updates• See all our coronavirus coverageWhen the lockdown is lifted, will the virus return? Of course it will. Matt Hancock has said we will do 100,000 tests each day by the end of April, but Britain still doesn’t have a way to control the virus that goes beyond...

Coronavirus: hospitals in West Midlands 'will be at capacity by next weekend'

Mayor says NEC field hospital will be ready to take patients as data shows 21% of deaths in England were in MidlandsCoronavirus – latest updatesSee all our coronavirus coverageHospitals in the West Midlands are forecast to reach maximum capacity by next weekend, the region’s mayor has said, amid growing concern that one in five deaths from coronavirus in England have happened in the...

New measurements reveal evidence of elusive particles in a newly-discovered superconductor

Particle chasing—it's a game that so many physicists play. Sometimes the hunt takes place inside large supercolliders, where spectacular collisions are necessary to find hidden particles and new physics. For physicists studying solids, the game occurs in a much different environment and the sought-after particles don't come from furious collisions. Instead, particle-like entities, called...

Groundwater, a threatened resource requiring sustainable management

According to data from the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO), groundwater supplies half of the world's population with fresh water and makes up 43% of the water used in irrigation. Despite its importance, it is calculated that about a third of the world's greatest aquifers are drying up quickly and that 20% are being overexploited. In Spain, a country where a large...

Changes to drylands with future climate change

While drylands around the world will expand at an accelerated rate because of future climate change, their average productivity will likely be reduced, according to a new study. These regions, which primarily include savannas, grasslands and shrublands, are important for grazing and non-irrigated croplands. They are also a critical part of the global carbon cycle and make up 41% of Earth's land...

Plant root hairs key to reducing soil erosion

The tiny hairs found on plant roots play a pivotal role in helping reduce soil erosion, a new study has found. The research provides compelling evidence that when root hairs interact with the surrounding soil they reduce soil erosion and increase soil cohesion by binding soil particles.

Tissue dynamics provide clues to human disease

Scientists have studied oscillating patterns of gene expression, coordinated across time and space within a tissue grown in vitro, to explore the molecular causes of a rare human hereditary disease known as spondylocostal dysostosis.

UK ministers struggle to keep promise of 100k coronavirus tests by end of April

Frustrated NHS staff and scientists say they have labs ready but cannot get the materialsCoronavirus – latest updatesSee all our coronavirus coverageThe UK government’s pledge to carry out 100,000 coronavirus tests a day by the end of the month is unravelling, with NHS laboratory staff and scientists warning they do not have the test kits, chemicals and components they need to scale up.Boris...

Research pinpoints which Australian cities take biggest economic blow from COVID-19

In an international collaboration between the University of South Australia Business School, the Hunter Foundation Research Centre at the University of Newcastle and George Mason University in Washington, D.C., researchers have pinpointed which Australian cities are most vulnerable to economic disruptions caused directly by the impacts of the COVID-19 pandemic.

New NASA radar looks to monitor volcanoes and earthquakes from space

Instead of looking up to the sky for bright bursts of fiery color, a research team spent Fourth of July 2018 peering down at fiery globs of molten lava from a sky-diving airplane. Bolted to their plane was a new NASA instrument designed to detect each time the volcano took a breath, as its caldera swelled and deflated.

Isolating an elusive phosphatetrahedrane

A research team in the Department of Chemistry at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), Cambridge U.S., explored a synthetic pathway to generate a phosphatetrahedrane framework. During the synthetic route, the team replaced a single carbon vertex with another p-block element within a highly strained tetrahedrane molecule. Highly strained molecules possess unusually acute bond angles at...

Plant root hairs key to reducing soil erosion

The tiny hairs found on plant roots play a pivotal role in helping reduce soil erosion, a new study has found. The research, led by the University of Bristol and published in Communications Biology, provides compelling evidence that when root hairs interact with the surrounding soil they reduce soil erosion and increase soil cohesion by binding soil particles.

Do urban fish exhibit impaired sleep?

Melatonin controls the body clock—high melatonin levels make us feel tired in the evening. However, the hormone also plays an important role in animals' biological rhythms. Artificial light at night—light pollution—can suppress the production of melatonin in fish, even at very low light intensities, a finding established by researchers from the Leibniz-Institute of Freshwater Ecology and...

Capturing 3D microstructures in real time

Researchers have invented a machine-learning based algorithm for quantitatively characterizing material microstructure in three dimensions and in real time. This algorithm applies to most structural materials of interest to industry.