275 articles from THURSDAY 12.3.2020

Monty Python's silly walk: A gait analysis and wake-up call to peer review inefficiencies

Fifty years ago, Monty Python's famous sketch, "The Ministry of Silly Walks," first aired on BBC One. The sketch pokes fun at the inefficiency of government bureaucracy. It opens with the Minister (John Cleese) walking in a rather unusual manner to his work, the Ministry of Silly Walks, where Mr. Pudey (Michael Palin) is waiting to meet with him to apply for a government grant to develop his silly...

Coronavirus: as many as 10,000 in Britain may already have it, says PM

Chief medical officer adds that 80% of UK could contract virus, with half a million people dyingCoronavirus – latest updatesUp to 10,000 people may already have coronavirus in Britain and many families should expect to lose loved ones before their time, Boris Johnson warned on Thursday as he set out measures less stringent than those taken by other countries.Medical, scientific and public health...

Monty Python's silly walk: A gait analysis and wake-up call to peer review inefficiencies

Fifty years ago, Monty Python's famous sketch, 'The Ministry of Silly Walks,' first aired. The sketch pokes fun at the inefficiency of government bureaucracy. It opens with the Minister (John Cleese) walks in a rather unusual manner to his work, the Ministry of Silly Walks, where Mr. Pudey (Michael Palin) is waiting for him. Based on a gait analysis, a research team finds that the Minister's silly...

Facebook language changes before an emergency hospital visit

A new study reveals that the language people use on Facebook subtly changes before they make a visit to the emergency department (ED). A team of researchers provides more evidence that social media is often an unseen signal of medical distress and could be used to better understand the contexts in which patients seek care, such as during the current COVID-19 pandemic.

A new use for museum fish specimens

The discoloured fish that rest in glass jars in museums across the world are normally used by specialists as references to study the traits that identify certain species. But a new study proposes an additional use for such 'samples.'

Verdicts of experts on government's new coronavirus measures

Medical and scientific experts react to Boris Johnson’s press conference as the UK moves into the delay phaseProf Deenan Pillay, professor of virology, University College LondonThe ways these measures are developed and issued will be balancing the urgency of trying to flatten the curve of the peak versus activities that are sustainable and realistic. The purpose of staying at home for seven days...

Coronovirus poses threat to climate action, says watchdog

IEA warns that Covid-19 could cause a slowdown in world’s clean energy transitionThe coronavirus health crisis may lead to a slump in global carbon emissions this year but the outbreak poses a threat to long-term climate action by undermining investment in clean energy, according to the global energy watchdog.The International Energy Agency (IEA) expects the economic fallout of Covid-19 to wipe...

Ocean acidification impacts oysters' memory of environmental stress

As oceans absorb more carbon dioxide, they are becoming increasingly acidic and shifting the delicate balance that supports marine life. How species will cope with ocean acidification and the other consequences of global climate change is still very much unknown and could have sweeping consequences.

Environmental DNA in rivers offers new tool for detecting wildlife communities

Ecologists in England and Scotland, collaborating with ecologists Christopher Sutherland and Joseph Drake at the University of Massachusetts Amherst, report this week on a new method of identifying an "entire community of mammals"—including elusive and endangered species that are otherwise difficult to monitor—by collecting DNA from river water.

The Guardian view on the government and coronavirus: a risky path | Editorial

The UK is adopting a much more limited response than other countries. It may be ignoring essential lessons from elsewhereHow quickly the unthinkable can become reality. We are all entering a new world as the Covid-19 pandemic takes hold. Many more families in the UK will lose loved ones, the prime minister has warned: while 590 cases have been identified, officials say the true number is probably...

Perturbation-free studies of single molecules

Researchers of the University of Basel have developed a new method with which individual isolated molecules can be studied precisely -- without destroying the molecule or even influencing its quantum state. This highly sensitive technique for probing molecules is widely applicable and paves the way for a range of new applications in the fields of quantum science, spectroscopy and chemistry.

Heat stress may affect more than 1.2 billion people annually by 2100

Heat stress from extreme heat and humidity will annually affect areas now home to 1.2 billion people by 2100, assuming current greenhouse gas emissions, according to a new study. That's more than four times the number of people affected today, and more than 12 times the number who would have been affected without industrial era global warming.

Gold nanoparticles uncover amyloid fibrils

Scientists have developed powerful tools to unmask the diversity of amyloid fibrils, which are associated with Alzheimer's disease and other neurodegenerative disorders. The scientists made the breakthrough by developing gold nanoparticles that combine with cryogenic transmission electron microscopy, to provide rapid and unprecedented images of fibrils.

New book debunks myths about who causes crime and why

Forty years ago, Craig Haney was a young professor of psychology at UC Santa Cruz when a question about the real causes of crime began to form in his mind: What if most violent criminal behavior is rooted in early childhood suffering, particularly the harrowing experiences of trauma, abuse, and maltreatment?