245 articles from WEDNESDAY 8.7.2020

UCLA-led team develops ways to keep buildings cool with improved super white paints

A research team led by UCLA materials scientists has demonstrated ways to make super white paint that reflects as much as 98% of incoming heat from the sun. The advance shows practical pathways for designing paints that, if used on rooftops and other parts of a building, could significantly reduce cooling costs, beyond what standard white 'cool-roof' paints can achieve.

University of Guam: Two climate patterns predict coral bleaching months earlier

A new study by the Marine Laboratory at the University of Guam may help researchers predict coral bleaching months earlier than current tools, and, for the first time, may help predict invasion events of coral-eating crown-of-thorns starfish. The study was published on May 8 in Scientific Reports, a peer-reviewed journal published by Nature Research.

Value-based payments disproportionately impact safety-net hospitals

A new study led by researchers at Boston Medical Center, in collaboration with Harvard Pilgrim Health Care Institute, shows that value-based incentive programs aimed at reducing health care-associated infections did not improve infection rates in either safety-net or non-safety-net hospitals. Published in JAMA Network Open, these results also demonstrate persistent disparities between infection...

When is someone old?

Populations around the world are living longer lives than was the norm just a few decades ago, presenting governments with significant challenges in terms of caring for their growing elderly populations. According to a new study published in PLOS ONE, understanding how to assess who is elderly is a crucial first step for our understanding of population aging.

Where did the Asian longhorned ticks in the US come from?

The invasive population of Asian longhorned ticks in the United States likely began with three or more self-cloning females from northeastern Asia, according to a Rutgers-led study. Asian longhorned ticks outside the U.S. can carry debilitating diseases. In the United States and elsewhere they can threaten livestock and pets. The new study, published in the journal Zoonoses and Public Health,...

New Zealand: man with Covid-19 absconds from quarantine for supermarket 'dash'

Man charged over latest breach of quarantine as country deals with influx of returning citizens during the coronavirus pandemicCoronavirus – latest updatesSee all our coronavirus coverageA man in compulsory isolation has absconded from a quarantine hotel in New Zealand to make a late-night “spur-of-the-moment” dash to the supermarket before testing positive for Covid-19 the following...

New Zealand opposition MP who leaked details of Covid-19 patients steps down

Actions by Hamish Walker have dealt a blow to the National party weeks away from an electionCoronavirus – latest updatesSee all our coronavirus coverageAn opposition MP in New Zealand has announced he will not stand at September’s election after he confessed to leaking private details about all of the country’s active Covid-19 cases to several news outlets.The leak by Hamish Walker, a member...

Coronavirus live news: US to leave WHO as organisation warns crisis accelerating

US gives notice of withdrawal next year; Joe Biden says he would return the US to the WHO if elected; Jair Bolsonaro tests positive for Covid-19. Follow the latest updatesWHO acknowledges ‘evidence emerging’ of airborne spreadUS officially notifies World Health Organization of its withdrawalBrazilian president Jair Bolsonaro tests positive for coronavirusAustralia: Melbourne returns to...

Animals who try to sound 'bigger' are good at learning sounds

Some animals fake their body size by sounding bigger than they actually are. Maxime Garcia from the University of Zurich and Andrea Ravignani from the Max Planck Institute for Psycholinguistics studied 164 different mammals and found that animals that lower their voices to sound bigger are often skilled vocalists. Both strategies—sounding bigger and learning sounds—are likely driven by sexual...

Bright feathers, bright brains: hummingbirds 'can order numerically'

Study claims tiny creatures can order things in sequence, but researchers say it does not confirm they can countHummingbirds are not only bright in appearance but also in brain, it would seem, with new research suggesting the tiny creatures are able to understand a numerical concept of order.While hummingbirds have previously been found to visit flowers in particular sequences when foraging,...

Famous 'Jurassic Park' dinosaur is less lizard, more bird

From movies to museum exhibits, the dinosaur Dilophosaurus is no stranger to pop culture. Many probably remember it best from the movie 'Jurassic Park,' where it's depicted as a venom-spitting beast with a rattling frill around its neck and two paddle-like crests on its head. But a new comprehensive analysis of Dilophosaurus fossils is helping to set the record straight, finding that the...