292 articles from TUESDAY 6.4.2021

Fossil discovery deepens snakefly mystery

The recent discovery of four new species of ancient insects are leading scientists to question the evolutionary history of the snakefly. The fossils, discovered in British Columbia and Washington State, are estimated to be 52 million years old and were unearthed in a region once thought uninhabitable.

Key brain molecule may play role in many brain disorders

Scientists have identified a molecule called microRNA-29 as a powerful controller of brain maturation in mammals. Deleting microRNA-29 in mice caused problems very similar to those seen in autism, epilepsy, and other neurodevelopmental conditions. The results, published in Cell Reports, illuminate an important process in the normal maturation of the brain and point to the possibility that...

Womens' pain not taken as seriously as mens' pain

Researchers found that when male and female patients expressed the same amount of pain, observers viewed female patients' pain as less intense and more likely to benefit from psychotherapy versus medication as compared to men's pain, exposing a significant patient gender bias that could lead to disparities in treatments.

NASA's first weather report from Jezero Crater on Mars

The weather often plays a role in our daily plans. You might put on a light jacket when the forecast calls for a cool breeze or delay your travel plans because of an impending storm. NASA engineers use weather data to inform their plans, too, which is why they're analyzing the conditions millions of miles away on Mars.

Fossil discovery deepens snakefly mystery

Fossil discoveries often help answer long-standing questions about how our modern world came to be. However, sometimes they only deepen the mystery—as a recent discovery of four new species of ancient insects in British Columbia and Washington state is proving.

Secure type: Consumers say compact logos signal product safety

Compact logos can encourage favorable brand evaluations by signaling product safety, according to a new study by researchers at Boston College's Carroll School of Management and Indian Institute of Management Udaipur, who reviewed the opinions of 17,000 consumers and conducted additional experiments with a variety of logos.

Gained in translation: Subgenome fractionation determines hybrid vigor in maize

The adage goes, "Two is better than one." Well, that might be true for endeavors involving human heads, but when it comes to ears, hybrid maize tends to have a superior advantage over the parental stocks in most cases. This phenomenon, called hybrid vigor or "heterosis," has been used by agriculturalists across ages to create higher-yielding, more resistant varieties of maize all over the world.

Great tits change their traditions for the better

Researchers at the University of Konstanz and Max Planck Institute for Animal Behavior in Germany have found that birds are able to change their culture to become more efficient. Populations of great tits were able to switch from one behavior to a better alternative when their group members were slowly replaced with new birds. Published today as open access in the journal Current Biology, this...

New report shows high levels of arsenic and uranium in some wells

A new U.S. Geological Survey study provides an updated, statewide estimate of high levels of naturally occurring arsenic and uranium in private well water across Connecticut. This research builds on a USGS report published in 2017, with the new study including additional groundwater samples and focusing on previously underrepresented areas.

Dark Energy Survey physicists open new window into dark energy

The universe is expanding at an ever-increasing rate, and while no one is sure why, researchers with the Dark Energy Survey (DES) at least had a strategy for figuring it out: They would combine measurements of the distribution of matter, galaxies and galaxy clusters to better understand what's going on.

How preprints accelerated science communication during the pandemic

During the early phase of the pandemic, approximately 40% of the COVID-19 literature was shared as preprints—freely available manuscripts that are shared prior to peer-review. In a new study publishing in the open access journal PLOS Biology, researchers led by Dr. Jonathon Coates (Queen Mary University of London), Dr. Nicholas Fraser (Leibniz Information Centre for Economics, Germany) and Dr....

A novel form of cellular logistics

Biophysicists from Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet (LMU) in Munich have shown that a phenomenon known as diffusiophoresis, which can lead to a directed particle transport, can occur in biological systems.

Structural biology opens new perspectives for treating psychiatric disorders

Glycine is the smallest amino acid—one of the building blocks of proteins. It acts also as a neurotransmitter in the brain, enabling neurons to communicate with each other and modulating neuronal activity. Many researchers have focused on increasing glycine levels in synapses to find an effective treatment for schizophrenia. This could be done using inhibitors targeting Glycine Transporter 1...

The Guardian view on the pandemic: a universal crisis is revealing our divisions | Editorial

The UK must tread carefully. While some countries seem to be emerging from the shadows, no one is safe when Covid spreads so freelyThe pandemic has transformed the lives of billions around the globe, but beyond that common experience, it has highlighted and deepened divides rather than closed them. On Tuesday, the International Monetary Fund warned that inequality both within and between countries...

NASA Invites Public to Take Flight With Ingenuity Mars Helicopter

Portal origin URL: NASA Invites Public to Take Flight With Ingenuity Mars HelicopterPortal origin nid: 469889Published: Tuesday, April 6, 2021 - 14:07Featured (stick to top of list): noPortal text teaser: NASA is targeting no earlier than Sunday, April 11, for Ingenuity Mars helicopter’s first attempt at powered, controlled flight on another planet.Portal...